Westminster fountain at sunset

by Jorge Córdoba

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3

The ratio f/2.8 means the diameter of the entrance pupil is equal to the focal length divided by 2.8. The key thing to note about the above is that the entrance pupil is the image of the aperture stop as seen through the front of the lens, the ratio does not depend on the physical size of the aperture itself. A rear-mounted 2x teleconverter, such as you ...


0

I have recently used this lens and having a copy of the old lens, I could instantly see the difference in quality. The images are sharper towards the edges (way Sharper). I tested in backlit situations, and the purple fringing is way way reduced compare to the older model. The copy of the lens that I have, produced a slightly colder tint compared to the ...


5

Any EF lens can be used on one of Canon's full-frame cameras. Generally, when Canon makes a newer version of a lens, it's because there can either be improvements to the optical design, or they can make a cheaper version of the lens. With Ls, it's usually the former. The Mk I version of the 14L came out in 1991. The Mk II version in 2007, so you ...


4

First off, all EF lenses (L or otherwise) can be mounted on a Canon 5D. Nothing about the L precludes it from being mounted on other bodies, nor only the higher end bodies being restricted to only L lenses. The difference between the two (and I'm working from Ken Rockwell's review at Canon 14mm f/2.8 L II) Heavier (4oz heavier than the original) Built in ...


0

It depends on your style of shooting weddings. If you tend to take a lot of candids or use a photojournalism style, I think a 24mm would be useful. However, I wouldn't advise buying the Canon 24/1.4 straight off. Used Canon 24/2.8 are pretty cheap, and Sigma 24/1.8 won't hurt your pocketbook too hard. If you're in love with Canon's 24/1.4, try renting one ...


2

No, you don't want such a wide lens for a wedding, at least not for much. I shoot weddings using my 24-70 f/2.8 and my 70-200 f/2.8. During the ceremony, my 70-200 gets the most use with the 24-70 being used for a few shots to capture the entire room. You are constantly shooting from a distance both for the perspective it gives and also because you don't ...


0

A polyvalent zoom(50~200mm), something with a pretty high zoom if you want to take some portraits because like dpollitt said : an extremely wide angle lens for portraits, sure you can use it some for a wedding, but you would be silly to use it for most of the day - as you'll get tons of distortion. But why a polyvalent zoom because at a low zoom (~50mm) ...


2

There are several ways to approach this, and there are two 'problems' that you are looking at. The first is the panoramic format... One could use the approach done by photographers who shot APS-P images (or put a mask over a 5x7" (127mm x 177mm) slide or negative to get a a 60mm x 170mm frame (example: Above it all - the Arca Swiss 8x10 is an 8x10 ...



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