Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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1

Rectilinear and wider that 12mm on full frame is hard to get, but also hard to use. It's not usual to need more than this exceptionally wide angle in this context. The biggest issue with wider lenses is that they are more likely to suffer from flare ( just trying to avoid the Sun or a bright light source in shot can be impossible ) and are ( as a general ...


4

The widest rectilinear lens available for any full-frame is the Canon EF 11-24mm F/4L USM. To get a wider field-of-view, you need a fisheye or stitch multiple images. Like many extremely wide lenses, a 11-24mm lens does not allow attachments at the front, only filters at the back but those will not help you get a wider angle-of-view.


1

If you want you can use your 18mm focal length to construct much wider shots using software tools that joining overlapping images together. This sounds complicated, but is pretty much automated. It's also free apart from the small amount of computer time involved. It's not really suitable for dynamic scene, but some movement can be dealt with relatively ...


0

The best way to compare lenses when you are considering which one is good enough versus which one is best (but too expensive) is to look at real world images taken with each lens on cameras similar to your own. This allows you to see what may be accomplished using any particular setup. Be careful, though. It also means you can't blame the equipment when your ...


0

Would love to say there is a $20-$100 equivalent but this Sigma is my true and trusted wide angle. Sigma 8-16mm f/4.5-5.6 DC HSM FLD AF Ultra Wide Zoom Lens for APS-C sized Nikon Digital DSLR Camera. I started with the D3200 and upgraded to a D5200, D7000 and now a D7100. The lens has worked well with all of my cameras. Here are some samples taken with the ...


0

You probably already have a low-cost wide angle lens: the 18-55 kit lens. How do you fare with that at the 18mm end? If not well, then I wouldn't advise getting an ultrawide just yet, unless the "not well" translation is: "I just want to zoom out a whole lot more all the time!" Also, you need to understand that a add-on conversion lens and an actual lens ...


0

I've used both an inexpensive $20 screw on wide angle lens and my current $400 Tokina 11-16mm wide angle with a Nikon D3200. The $20 screw on lens aren't very good from my experience. The edges are very dark and often times distorted and loads of chromatic aberration, you will find yourself cropping most of the picture to get an OK quality shot. The more ...


1

Your 16-35 is a rectilinear normal lens, so you should mark the images as Normal (rectilinear), and fill in the appropriate focal length and crop factor (1.0) for the 5DMkIII. What I'm not sure of is why you have 72 images. Full coverage of the sphere with a 16-35 on full frame at 16mm only requires 17 to 29 images. Having nearly three times that many ...


3

So far I was really impressed by the 10mm ones, however the ones with at least decent aperture comes without Image Stabilization. I also looked to the 15mm ones, with IS. Ultra wide angle is a really desirable thing for me but I would also like to protect my pictures from blurring since I am not a fan of using a tripod. A longstanding rule of thumb ...


5

First, some terminology. On your 700D (or any of the 1.6x crop APS-C bodies), a 15mm and up is still just "wide angle". It's below 15mm that lenses become ultrawide. So if you want ultrawide, you need lenses that are around the 10-15mm focal length range. Wide angle on a 1.6x crop camera, typically means something in the 15-24mm range. Normal is around ...



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