Evening

by w.hrybok

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

How do I map these to Lightroom Lr calculates colour temperature and tint based on white balance coefficients in the raw file, not based on the camera settings for colour temperature and colour bias (AB/MG). When the camera settings for colour temperature, amber-blue (those are in fact fine adjustments of colour temperature; so they make for 1 parameter ...


1

The overall answer to your question: The system used by most digital cameras is based on the way color was fine-tuned in the film era. The color temperature setting corresponds to the film selected, and the AB and GM settings correspond to bias introduced by color conversion filters used during shooting or color compensating filters used during printing to ...


1

"A-B" is "amber-blue", or warmth bias; "G-M" is "green-magenta", or tint. The A-B setting is essentially a bias you can control around the colour temperature, so that if your camera would ordinarily have set the colour temperature to 5500K, a "A" filter setting will chose a slightly higher colour temperature so that the picture is rendered a little warmer ...


1

White light is an especially problematic concept that becomes most apparent in photography. For me, as I type this, I have the room illuminated by some 60 watt light bulbs and the computer monitor is set for 3400K is a useful extension). And things that I think of as white are white. However, a few hours ago, light was shining in and the monitor was set ...


3

The problem is actually a problem of neither your eyes nor the camera being able to capture the color. Your best bet is setting the white balance to "sunlight" and going from there. Here is the reason: color is a continuum of wavelengths, like sound is a continuum of frequencies. Now the human eye has three different kind of receptors that have some ...


1

The problem here is that cameras do not capture the colour of light sources at all. They capture the colour of objects which reflect light. This wall is white, the neutral grey card is a neutral grey. To create a picture that shows a false yellowish colour, as you saw it, you need to manipulate. You could fix wb on a blue object, which looks grey in this ...


2

The problem here is that -- whether you do that in post or in camera -- you don't have a proper point that you can say "hey, this is a neutral color". The camera actually accurately captured the color in its sensor information, it is just that the development process went a bit differently for the computer image than for the image you saw. What you see with ...


7

In this case, you shouldn't be using a grey card at all. Grey cards (and related devices and and cards) are used as a reference point to make an image's color neutral, as your second two images show, but you don't want neutral, you want warm. What you need to do is change to color temperature and/or saturation in post processing; changes to color ...


1

I think the problem lies in your expectation that the Portra film shots are going to strongly show the effects of different color temperatures. While it's true that Portra 160 (or any commonly-available color film these days) is daylight balanced, color prints and scans of color negatives are always color corrected as part of the process. The photo you're ...



Top 50 recent answers are included