Antarctica

Antarctica
by ʇolɐǝz ǝɥʇ qoq

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3

Re: your other question about what could still cause variations in color. (@Cody Hint: just because one relatively new low rep member has a negative comment on a question is no reason to immediately delete it.) The biggest issue is most likely the fluorescent lighting. There are two major considerations with most types of fluorescent lights in the context ...


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There are warming and cooling filters that can be mounted atop the lens. The warming series is 81A – 81B – 81C – 81D. These are pale salmon, 81D being the strongest. All require you to increase exposure 1/3 stop. Alternately, you can warm up the flash with gel filters. Gels are likely your best bet as they are available from theatrical supply houses as they ...


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Put a gel filter over your flash. Golden or orange (especially the CTO) will be best. These filters are available from various manufacturers and holders are also available,if you desire one. There is a product from Rosco that includes variety of pre-cut filters for this purpose that includes various effect colors, but also balancing ones. It is called The ...


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During the photo shoot, you need to take an exposure of a color calibration card (ColorChecker) and use it to create a camera color profile in your computer. X-Rite is a leading company in this field. Check out this video for the process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dn5VvB32wVI Preferably, create one profile for each photo shoot, and not only a general ...


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As well as shutter speed you need to set white balance not use auto wb. Set your white balance to florescent if you have that setting but using a color meter to measure the kelvin temp of the lights and setting that as a custom white balance would be better.


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The answers given by whuber and Matt Grum are correct, pointing out the flicker problem and some workarounds. My addendum comes 6 years after, where we are now beginning to see some real solutions to the lamp flicker problem: New cameras such as the Canon EOS 7D Mark II and 80D introduced an anti-flicker shooting mode. The camera uses the metering sensor ...


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It can't be done. The Fuji X-Pro 2, the current top-of-the-line model does not offer that ability. You'll have to move closer or back, or use a filter designed to give a "whole scene" white balance filter.


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Take an image of a white wall that has some structure/texture to it. Now take the white balance color picker in your favourite photo editor and click around in the image. You will see that even within a white wall, the color temperature is different, although these differences are not perceivable on the white wall (it all looks white), applying the ...


2

You can receive training to help you become more aware, but not more perceptive, in the way you mean. Perception is not absolute with fixed values; but, is relative to the abilities of your senses on a continuum. You can become aware that something should be happening on an intellectual level. Such a revelation is set into action with an observation and a ...


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I've never seen any apps that can train you that way, but I have seen a smartphone colorimeter apps that identify colors, as well as an actual smartphone colorimeter/light meter (or at least its Kickstarter). There are more apps to simulate exposure settings, to help train you in appropriate exposure settings for a given scene (e.g., CameraSim). That ...


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With experience you become more aware as to how lighting and the color of the illuminant will change the way a vista will reproduce. You begin to see that shadows on snow have a blueish tint and you become aware that tungsten lighting is biased towards the yellow. We humans see with our eye/brain and that complicates. Try this enlightening experiment. ...


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I rather doubt it, since perceived color has little to do with actual color balance. That's why you tend to interpret the color of an object as immutable whether you observe it in direct sunlight, late afternoon (sunset), or indoor incandescent lighting. The only reason we can tell, say, fluorescent vs. low-temperature (Edison bulb) incandescent is ...


4

Sadly, there's not much useful color information in the pictures to work with. This is probably not remotely the answer you were hoping for, but... Being a fan of the old tinted postcard look, if these were my pictures I would probably try to emulate that, as an alternative to going full monochrome. How to do this will depend on your choice of software, but ...



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