Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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5

Just because using different WB settings to demosaic the raw data is non-destructive to the raw data doesn't mean one WB setting will be more or less noisy than another. It's not so much that you will get equal quality regardless of how you choose to interpret the raw data, but rather that regardless of whatever interpretation you choose to use for the raw ...


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Extreme deviations <= Emphasis mine. Any extreme manipulation will. A "light" manipulation on a raw file won't. That is why you are working with a raw file in the first place, to have room to play with, including the white balance. was the "known" fact that WB changes to a RAW file are completely non-destructive. Yes, all the "changes" in a RAW ...


0

Some specific aplication for the white part. If you are in a dark room, probably is easier to take a photo of the white point instead of the gray. But do not over expose it. The same with the black. You are taking a nice High key photo overexposing some part of the photo, and you want to take a photo on that light situation, you could use the black one. ...


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I think that I was able to piece together the answer to my question based on the responses I received from Michael Clark and Alan Marcus. If my understanding is correct, the white and black cards are sold with gray cards because the primary purpose of these cards is to assist with metering, not white balance. As of now I am sampling in the gray card to ...


4

A little history will help you understand the purpose of the gray card: In the mid 1930's, Messrs Jones and Condit at the Kodak Laboratory determined that statistically, a typical sunlit scene integrated to a reflectance value of about 18%. About this time, the Western Electric Company brought to market the first light meter. Kodak Labs published a ...


1

18% Gray cards are not primarily intended for white balance adjustment. They are designed for exposure adjustment, as are the black and white cards that sometimes accompany them. A gray card intended primarily for white balance calibration will usually be around 80% gray, and not 18% gray.


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This began as a comment and grew enough to become a potential "answer." Here's a bit of physiological trivia that might throw some light (!) on why ~5000K was chosen as a good "correllated colour temperature" standard for critical colour comparison. At that wavelength, human eye receptors in the retina are optimal for red, green, and blue radiation. ...


4

The more samples / swatches you have the more accurate your device characterisation will be, as a matter of fact X-Rite has the ColorChecker DC for that: http://www.rmimaging.com/information/colorchecker_dc.html X-Rite samples / swatches pigments are fairly stable although their lifespan is usually 2 years, it can be shorter or longer depending how heavily ...



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