Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
by octopus                

Submit your Photo
Hall of Fame

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

New answers tagged

0

As no-one else has mentioned it already... Lightroom is fine. It can convert raw images. Does a reasonable job of them. Got a copy, use it periodically. But I've never been able to get images out of it that match what I can produce from Capture One from my Nikon or Olympus cameras. Back to back conversions on the same file, experimenting with all sorts of ...


1

This is a very old question but it remains relevant so I'll add my 3 cents. Lightroom's white balance presets seem to be just ballpark figures not tuned to any camera-specific properties. The best way to get Nikon/Canon/whatever-like rendition in Lightroom is described here and here. Basically: Take some photos with your camera using built-in white ...


0

The industry standard for viewing color prints is 5500⁰K. I think that this fact is moot when viewing images on a monitor. Becasue the human eye/brain combination has a built-in white balance mechanism, the brain automatically adjusts the sensitivity of our vision system. This occurs all the time but you are likely unaware. Try this test: Procure some ...


5

You're not going to get "color accurate" white balance at night. There's no way to make every object in the scene look the same color it would be if viewed under full spectrum daylight. This is because night scenes typically have a myriad of varying light sources in them. Those various sources are all different temperatures and have different amounts of the ...


6

Short answer: Shoot raw (if the camera can do that) and find the best WB setting with your image software. Reasons: Good night photos have their atmosphere because of their strong colors, not because of an accurate white balance. You have to test some night shots with seemingly boring-looking light and try intentionally "wrong" white balances. A really ...


0

Photo scientists use instrumentation to calibrate film and photographic prints. These instruments are called densitometers. Transmission densitometers direct a beam of light of known intensity at a film sample. The light transverses the film and the intensity measured. Transmission is the amount of light that gets through divided by the total amount of light ...


1

I rarely use the dropper anymore, because it doesn't usually give me the results I want (accurate reproduction of all colors in the photo, even when shot under less than ideal lighting). The same goes for Auto white balance as the default WB when opening a raw file. If you're not shooting raw files, then you've got to get the WB very close when shooting or ...


1

If you have 200 images, you don't need 200 different white balance setting unless the temperature of the lighting also changed 200 times. Since you shot RAW (you did right?) the WB setting you initially chose matters very little (although as proven on this site, it matters a bit). Just select the images that were shot in the same lighting, perhaps 40 images, ...


3

is this as simple as metering off a standard 18% gray card every few photos (or say every 30 minutes)? Could this be accomplished in post-photo editing software? The issue here is white balance, and there are basically two options: you can take steps to make sure that the light is always the same color, or you can adjust the white balance to compensate ...


1

You could kill the ambient light and light the scene only with a flash unit or strobe. See: What does it mean to "kill the ambient"?



Top 50 recent answers are included