Lightnings taking a ride

by ceinmart

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7

I think there's a couple of points here: There's one set of things that a professional photographer might find annoying and another set that might make an innocent guest feel insulted. But since lines are not sharp it behooves both sides to step back and create some sort of a "demilitarized zone" in the middle. i.e. There's a range of behaviors that most ...


1

First of all, ask your clients if they have any problem with their height difference being portrayed. As Eric said, forcing tricks of perspective on the couple when they neither wanted them nor even considered their different heights to be "a problem" that needed solving, would not be a good idea. Second of all, you could shoot the couple on a staircase, ...


10

I would expect a professional to simply say, "Sorry, I didn't realize I was disturbing you," and stop shooting the same subjects at the same time. You can still be in the way, even from behind. People don't like ruining other people's shots. You're forcing them to commit little microagressions against you every time they get in your way or make you move. ...


2

When shooting a wedding where you have to capture the right moment, you'll depend a lot on intuition, your reflexes to shoot at the right moment has to work out well. The part of the brain that controls this are the more primitive brain parts, they will be influenced a lot more by irrational factors that may cause you to feel tense. E.g. the mere possibility ...


4

I suggest prior consultation with the bride and groom. Ask whether they would like you to take extra photos. If they would like you to take extra photos, ask them to inform the hired photographer, in advance of the wedding, and assure the photographer that you will be sensitive to their sight lines etc. If not, leave your camera at home. Even if you did not ...


6

There is no nice way to do something unreasonable. What you are trying to achieve is not possible because it is based on a fundamentally wrong premise. It is rude, arrogant and demeaning to approach a professional trying to do their job and suggest you know better. The way you have responded to answers and comments on this thread indicates that you would ...


3

What I would do is try not to compete with the official photographer. Multiple similar looking pictures, even if yours are slightly better aren't going to help the bride and groom anyway, probably only embarass them. Take an alternative approach instead. Maybe try to document the event from a guest point of view. Come with just a smartphone or a small ...


3

I think the answer is clear, if you are not the hired photographer then don't get in that person's way or make it hard for them to do their job. There should never have been a situation nor should it have been escalated in any way. If you are attending as a guest, you should be a guest and not even mention who you are or what you think, unless you have done ...


3

In lieu of any answers that have really fully addressed the question I'm trying to ask about getting a discussion back on track from a professional photographer being out of control, I did want to share what I've come up with as my way to avoid this problem entirely in the future. Previously, I relied on talking to the photographer at the first available ...


31

I have found that the best technique is to leave your equipment at home or at a minimum in your vehicle. Let the paid professionals capture the images they were hired to capture and you enjoy the event as the hosts intended; as a guest.


24

I am going to respond to this as the photographer. If and when I am covering a wedding or such an event as you have mentioned, I get really frustrated by guests bringing their DSLRs with them. To the point where I have actually spoken to the bride's mother and suggested that I want so and so to put their camera away as I am finding it a distraction. Don’t ...


11

I believe what you are asking for here is the correct combination of words to make a professional photographer understand your reason and logic, and allow you to keep snapping pictures. The problem is when you look at it from the angle of the people actually hired to take photos. Let's try another. I'm a DJ by trade. My niece is getting married. She ...


56

The hosts of the wedding chose, for whatever reason, to hire the "official" photographers to document their event. As a guest of those same hosts you should respect the choice they have made and make every effort to accommodate your hosts wishes. If those hired are less than welcoming and courteous to you, you should still respond to them in a way that ...


0

Do you like apples or pears better? Photography is an arbitrary choice too, of style. The photographers using flash or studio lighting are in one camp, adding necessary and sufficient light for the purpose and situation (sometimes based on what will sell better). The available light people are in the other camp, thinking the situation should be retained ...


1

Does "brighter lighting" mean you have control over the scene, or (like other answerers assume) you are referring to a hand-held flash? If you are lighting the scene, or can influence the lights being used for the situation, then by all means use brighter and better-quality light! If you can place remote slaves ahead of time, "more light" that way is good. ...


0

It depends. There are several competing factors to think about, such as: Having brighter lighting will kill any ambient light (if there is any). Obviously this is an artistic choice. Sometimes you might want this, other times not. Shooting at high power will increase your flash recharge time, possibly up to several seconds. If you are shooting people, for ...


0

It's sort of like the problem of not having a long enough lens to magnify a different object: you can use digital zoom, or crop ("blow up") the image in post processing, but the image degrades. You are using a digital trick to compensate for the lack of good light, or signal, coming into the camera lens in the first place. Better to use a telephoto. Same ...


3

You can realistically use either. However both come with their own limitations and drawbacks. If you use high ISO then your image quality will start to degrade, causing what is commonly referred to as noise in the image. This means people generally try to avoid using high ISOs when shooting photographs. On the other hand if you use brighter lighting then ...


0

Probably the best source of soft light is natural light through a window, doorway, etc. As AJ points out, it's about finding a large source of light. It's usually suggested that you use a north-facing window if you're in the northern hemisphere, since you'll get diffuse light as opposed to direct sunlight through the window.



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