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Hot answers tagged

59

The hosts of the wedding chose, for whatever reason, to hire the "official" photographers to document their event. As a guest of those same hosts you should respect the choice they have made and make every effort to accommodate your hosts wishes. If those hired are less than welcoming and courteous to you, you should still respond to them in a way that ...


42

I'll start with a brief* word of advice. (*it grew :-) ) Don't !!!! If you value the friend's friendship and that of her sister and new husband, then the chances of them being damaged as a result of your endeavours are high enough to not be worthwhile. You MAY turn out to be a born natural wedding photographer and produce astoundingly marvellous results ...


40

How to Find a Second-Shooter Gig (A Brief Primer to the Somewhat harsh Realities of the Wedding Photography Industry) No, Really... How do I Find a Gig? The most reliable way to find high-quality second-shooter gigs is to research the photographers in your area, check out their websites, and directly contact any photographers whose work you like to give ...


35

Yes and no. I'm a professional event photographer and I run into this fairly frequently. I don't work a lot of weddings but I do many conferences and other less formal events where there are often other amateur/attendee photographers during an event. A skilled professional will be able to maneuver amongst a crowd including a crowd that involves other ...


35

I have found that the best technique is to leave your equipment at home or at a minimum in your vehicle. Let the paid professionals capture the images they were hired to capture and you enjoy the event as the hosts intended; as a guest.


33

It depends on your and the couple's expectations. No expectations? No problems. As the main shooter in getting high quality shots? Very difficult. Without experience? Pretty much impossible. Though it depends highly on the venue and how it is orchestrated. Outside before and after shots, pose shots, etc. are no problem, but the ceremony and reception ...


31

Event photographers are generally in the business of selling prints, not just snapping photos. They want to sell you the best images they can make, not the raw material for making those images. There may also be some concern that their name will be attached to images that they didn't entirely control: they don't want to be associated with your questionable ...


25

NOTE: To some extent my answer is 'US-centric' being as I've never had to price my photography in another country. If you're not in the US, your mileage may vary. Never, ever base your price on what other photographers in your area are charging. You have no way of knowing what their expenses are, and thus you have no way of knowing what their profit margin ...


25

I am going to respond to this as the photographer. If and when I am covering a wedding or such an event as you have mentioned, I get really frustrated by guests bringing their DSLRs with them. To the point where I have actually spoken to the bride's mother and suggested that I want so and so to put their camera away as I am finding it a distraction. Don’t ...


25

I'd rather not just let the photographer pick the X images that he/she thinks are best to edit and deliver because he/she won't have the same opinion as me as to which images are the best. But you let him pick what equipment he uses, the settings of the camera, the lens, where he points the camera, when he takes an image, etc. It's odd pay somebody to do ...


24

The answer to your question depends on what you mean by "photograph a wedding". You can certainly get some beautiful photos at a wedding with that setup, but it would be almost impossible to photograph the wedding in the way most people would expect, a 50mm on a 350D is just not wide enough. What some people don't realise is that there are couples who ...


22

That may well be their photos on the website. Even people who are not that good will produce one really good photo per wedding. If people have been doing weddings for a long time they can usually produce a great portfolio whilst each wedding is not so good. This is the biggest problem with looking for photographers on the web but there are a few tips: Ask ...


22

Because unedited / unretouched images do not represent the photographers' best efforts. A wedding photographer is not somebody hired to use an expensive point-and-shoot. The shots they take require editing because there is more information in the RAW file (digital negative) than can be represented in any JPEG image. It's part of the creative process to push/...


22

You are trying to write software to make wrangling drunk people, shooting people of vastly different ages, and people who either have a strong desire or no desire at all to be a part of the pictures at all; easier to do? I want to stop you right there. Your best options aren't software related. They start with setting expectations with the couple at the ...


20

I've shot plenty of wedding cakes (all on location) and whilst the techniques vary I can offer some general advice on the location side of things to complement Stan's fine answer on lighting techniques. Lighting wise I use a bounced hotshoe flash whenever there's a white or neutral ceiling. Otherwise it's ambient light. One way cakes are not like people is ...


19

First I'd like to address the other comments. They are correct if you present yourself as a professional photographer. While it may sound "snooty," it's true that you can't properly do a wedding unless you have some serious glass. You should have a collection that gives you 17mm-200mm and f/2.8 along that entire range. Prime is always better, but a 17-55 ...


18

You are right, a wedding is hard to do. But it is not impossible and we all have to start somewhere. One of the biggest challenges is going to be staying ahead of the program and getting in the right spot at the right time. Much of wedding photography is being prepared for the "next shot", getting yourself positioned and close enough to the action, and ...


16

There's a difference in "doing it as a wedding present" (for friends/family) and "doing it return for money". The "must have"s stay the same, but I would expect a professional to cover most of the "should have"s too. Having the right equipment There are three main groups of kit, the "must", the "should" and the "nice to": Must have Camera Lens (...


15

As other commenters suggest, you're in for a world of hurt if you're the primary photographer with no experience. It's not really the equipment that's the problem (you can rent what you need and bill the couple), but rather the fact that wedding photography is hard and there are no do-overs. I suggest you check out this article over at the LensRentals blog ...


15

I'm not a photog pro (let alone a Wedding photog pro), but I think that in a world where every phone is a camera, and almost every camera around is a phone, it is non-realistic to put such a phrase ("no other photography should take place during event") in the contract.


15

Comparing the Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L II IS USM against the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 APO EX DG HSM OS FLD you will find that the Canon excels in almost every aspect, and the price reflects that. Sharpness The Sigma lens provides a very compelling option on a crop sensor camera. It performs well when stopped down to f/4.0 and beyond. The issue is that in ...


15

Wow, are you hosed. You tell them the price before you start. Its too late now. Traditionally, wedding photographers made all their money off prints. If you give them soft copies, you cut yourself out of that profit stream. Bay Area, NYC, Chicago, etc. I wouldn't consider doing a shoot unless I got at least $100 per hour for my time. Plus I'd want more to ...


14

I did a wedding earlier this year, and having never done one before had the same fears as you. For me, the following points were very important: Talk to the bride & groom in advance. Discuss what they want from you out of the day. They are the MOST IMPORTANT thing for you to consider. They may ask for formal shots at the church, or informal shots at ...


14

This is not a silly post in the matter of an amateur that gets asked to work paying gigs. If your work is satisfactory, it is very common to initially have close friends and family consider you for their photography needs. As word of mouth continues, of course even people outside of your immediate contacts will pick up on your skills and engage in business ...


13

I've not needed to do this yet (despite pressure from a would-be-mother-in-law) but I would suggest asking the photographer if you can see the full set of photos (s)he took on their most recent shoot. You have to bear in mind that a photographer's portfolio only shows you their best shots which could just be luck and offers no indication of how consistent ...


13

I strongly, strongly suggest that you get a zoom lens, something like the 17-50 mm Sigma f/2.8 (or it's older brother, the 18-50mm). I suggest this because you will not have time for recomposition by changing position; a wedding is an event that will happen quickly, and you'll need a tool that will let you get the angles and the shots you need as they ...


13

I do have various clauses, 'act of god,' 'exclusivity of photographer,' etc. as others have outlined in their answers, and (assuming you're based in the US, YMMV if you're elsewhere) you should have these sorts of clauses too, if nothing else for the following reasons... Unlike many of the photographers I personally know in the city I live and work, I walk ...


13

There's some great advice in the other answers. One clause you might want to add is one that specifies that you aren't liable for any restrictions imposed by the venue. If the bride hired you based on some neat lighting effect you are known for, but you show up and the church officiant decides he won't allow any flash photography, you don't want to be on ...


13

On crop sensor cameras such as the 7D, 60D, etc Canon only makes one lens that really fits the bill. The Canon 17-55mm f/2.8 IS is the bread and butter of this range. Many full frame photographers keep a crop sensor camera around just to be able to use a lens with IS in this range, with this aperture, on a zoom. The 24-70mm f/2.8 L is the closest comparison,...



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