Serene Life

by garik

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71

I once made a picture which I believe displays rain quite well. I think the main reason why it works is the backlight coming from the car lights. There are two parts of the image where the rain is very visible. One of them is the area directly in front of the car, where the backlight makes the rain shine and the background is almost black. Another area is ...


61

If you want them to stand out against the background, you need to use a flash. On-axis will generally reflect the most light off the snowflakes to the camera and have them stand out more. I used a cheap eBay plastic cover with a space for the flash for the picture below. Otherwise, a fast shutter speed may make them visible, but it depends on the background ...


40

Photographing rain is very hard because: Rain is fast Rain is small So usually you can do several things: Use flash to "freeze" the rain (or use very high shutter speed if light is permitting) Narrow your angle (zoom) Some examples: http://digital-photography-school.com/forum/how-i-took/107734-rain-flash.html and ...


24

Here is how I usually approach the subject: I attach a remote cable release to the camera and set the camera to manual mode, and make a first guess on exposure (for instance 15 sec, f/11, ISO 100 or 200). Then I shoot a test frame and check the resulting image. I aim to make an exposure where the landscape looks like I want it to look in the lightning ...


23

Using weather sealed camera bodies and lenses helps, but each condition has its own issues. Rain: in light rain you can probably get away without doing anything special, but in heavy rain, you'll need to wrap your camera in a plastic bag with an opening for the lens. Dry it off well with a towel when you get inside. Heat: Two separate issues... static and ...


22

There are MANY links below...hover over each one to identify where they start and end, and view each example. ;) For nature: Position your camera behind a lone tree or under a forest canopy, and let the filtered sunlight (or moonlight) create rays of light in the fog. Capture trees fading into the fog. Find a lake shore or some islands out on the water, ...


21

A lot of dSLRs are rated to 0 degrees celsius or 32 faranheit, though some more pro ones are rated to lower temperatures. Most of this is about the battery life, it will suffer in the cold. However, in general, condensation is going to be your enemy when moving from cold back into warmth, so the best way to handle that is to put the camera and lens into a ...


19

Unfortunately, very few camera models specify the amount of resistance as anything measurable. Water and dust resistance, as specified by Canon, means very little. If it said waterproof and dustproof that would be a stronger statement. I also feel lawyers got involved somewhere in the writing of these things. For example, some Nikon manuals say 'resistant ...


18

There is actually quite a few products designed specifically for this purpose, ranging in prices. Most of the products are glorified rain ponchos, and as such, if you have the DIY spirit, you can save yourself major bucks. This is a really good instructional on making one out of rain pants. If you'd rather buy an OTS solution, then consider the ThinkTank ...


17

Here are my tips: try to choose the angle so that the raindrops reflect as much light as possible try to frame so that the lighter drops are separated from darker background try to get perspective into the picture (so that there are objects at different distances which will render the lighter the longer the distance to the object) try different (fairly ...


17

In my experience, if there's lots of cloud overhead, but a break in the cloud towards the western horizon, then as the sun dips below it will illuminate pretty much the whole sky. Don't forget that the best lighting occurs AFTER the sun has actually set. Make sure you have some foreground interest too, if possible, just to add a bit of depth.


16

In Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure", he recommends that in order to simulate falling rain, you use a garden sprinkler, and exposure time of 1/60 sec. Shoot your subjects backlit for best results. This video shows how it's done.


16

Weather Sealing is protection of the internal parts of a camera from external influences such as moisture, dust, and humidity. The degree of this weather sealing varies between manufacturers and also within models by each manufacturer. The protection is provided by both rubber sealing with silicon rings and gaskets as well as design considerations such as ...


15

It is pretty similar to photographing fireworks (if it is relatively dark out or you have tons of ND filters): Use a tripod. Set aperture and ISO exposure for daylight. Use bulb mode, open the shuter and wait for a lightning flash, then close the shutter (a remote is useful). Use RAW, it it will give you a lot of headroom in case you want to increase ...


14

Set the exposure compensation to +1 or +2 (or shoot manual!) as snow reflects a lot more light than the 18% reflectance that the camera's metering system assumes. Filters wise just what you'd use for landscapes, a graduated ND and polarizer are helpful. Composition-wise, isolating details can be difficult if everything around you is white so you have to ...


11

Stable tripod, stop down your aperture, lower ISO, use ND filters if needed, switch off "long exposure noise reduction" otherwise you send half of the time exposing dark frames. Disable automatics that are too smart or keep the time between shots long. The main concept when photographing such unpredictable things is to keep the shutter open as much of the ...


11

I shot a (relatively popular) series of photos in the fog last year at night, feel free to check the EXIF info or the pics for inspiration. Essentially I was using my fastest lens, a 50mm f/1.4, hand held (this flash fog didn't last long, no time for a tripod). I relied on a lot of silhouetting, and city lights (naturally diffused by the fog). The light ...


10

I'm involved in a research project on glaciers and as such often have to use a computer in the cold, although thankfully never that cold. One thing I've found works well is wearing thin glove liners under fingerless gloves. This way you can use the equipment fairly easily but if you have a short break you can flip the mitten bit of the fingerless gloves ...


10

Cold and hot are quite different and I can only answer the cold part since I live in Canada and have not been above 40+ with a digital camera. Living in Canada and reviewing digital cameras means that I have taken hundreds of cameras out at temperatures well below freezing. What normally happens is not very nasty but will stop you from taking pictures. ...


9

I think the answer depends on whether you are trying to capture the mood of the rainy scene or the actual raindrops. If the mood, I think your scene above has some good possibilities, but you need to zoom in. I think there are many possibilities among those buildings and trees. A tripod will help as you could compose the right framing and then wait until ...


9

I'm not aware of any specific claims for immersion, rain or dust resistance made for any SLRs. I've not read every warranty, but if there was even one that covered water damage I'd be surprised. Weather sealing is typically a combination of high-tolerance, tight-fitting joints and gaskets. "Better" sealing essentially consists of more sealing in more ...


9

The Canon 7D has quite nice weather sealing - "Canon considers the weather resistance of the EOS 7D to be slightly better than the EOS 5D Mark II and 50D cameras, but not as robust as the EOS-1D series." (Chuck Westfall, Canon USA) What this basically means is that you can not worry about shooting in rain. I wouldn't take it swimming, but you might be able ...


9

Basically no. Canon offers varying degrees of weather sealing on their cameras and the 60D has some sealing, but I would not use it in rain, beyond a light mist. They do make bags you can put around your camera and lens if absolutely necessary. You can get an idea of where the 60D is sealed in this review (callout near the bottom) ...


9

Yes, there are cameras that will work in extreme weather — at least on the more realistic side of each situation. There are many ruggedized cameras, almost any of which will cover some degree of each item on your whole list — although none will take being actually hit by lightning. A ruggedized camera can handle going to the beach (although you should be ...


9

Awesome question, I am studying for my Private Pilot license and (as a photographer) found the chapter on Weather Theory facinating. Among other things, it gives a very reasonable description on the predictors for fog (and other meteorological events). It describes 4 kinds of fog and when each may/will occur: Radiation Fog: "On clear nights, with ...


8

Snow will be just grey before other snow. So you have to find a background (beginning of snow falling), use a lightsource nevertheless (like a flash) or wait for a sun-snow-mix (seldom, but worth it ... the glittering flakes are precious, halos are sometimes an extra). I can understand that you don't like using flash (on the camera) as it highlights the ...


8

One of the things I've learnt about shooting sunsets is do not try to guess when a good one is going to come or not ... if you've decided to go and shoot the setting sun then go and don't let the weather or other conditions deter you. A good example of this is one day I was on the way to a chosen spot for a sunset session and a storm rolled in obliterating ...


8

You can wait till it gets dark, and street lamp create shafts of light, and use those to your advantage. You can also backlight someone (for example with car headlamps) and him look like he's stepping out of a flying saucer.


8

Background can be anything, for example just trees - but the lighting is important. If it lights up the drops (for example from the side), you'll catch them, if not, then they'll stay invisible before the background. That is not so different from snow. In an industrial area I'd try to catch rain under street-lights in dusk/dawn at first - if you get the ...


8

Some have enquired as to the durability of the 7D, and others have even tested it in various weather I was shown how a Nikon D3 can handle mud. The Pentax K5 looks like it could withstand a little punishment. It really depends what you have in mind. How sadistic do you need to be (to your gear and yourself) to get the shot you want.



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