Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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19

The most common approach to taking great flowing water pictures is to use a long exposure. This allows the "soft, dreamy flow" of water to be captured as you have probably seen in many photos. Achieving a long exposure may require extra equipment, depending on how the scene is lit. Long Exposures To achieve a long exposure, you will need to reduce the ...


18

This reddit comment goes into detail on what the photographer did: Here's a summary of the settings, technique and post processing used for the photo, taken from a comment on my wallpaper post a month ago: Canon 5D mkII DSLR + 28mm f/1.8 USM lens. Filters are extremely important for this shot. We shot pre-sunrise at a muddy/sandy area on the coast ...


13

This looks like a very easy shot and requires knowing a few tricks. This is my guess: Long exposure makes the water look very soft. Probably 8-15s but that depends on the speed of the waves. He probably used a small aperture (F/8 or so) and got lots of depth-of-field. This helps getting a long shutter-speed as well but so does the use of ND filters. He ...


10

There are different ways that you can shoot moving water: Freezing it, at about 1/100 s. A little movement, at about 1/10 s. Much movement, at about 1 s. Foggy, at about 10 s. The best time for each effect of course varies a bit depending on the scene, and the focal length. A polarising filter has great effect on water, as light that bounces off water ...


10

Just to add to Stan Rogers' answer, here is a non processed example of such a blur happening on the reflected image after a 15s exposure. While the surface objects are reasonably sharp, the reflections are clearly not. Also note the effect on the clouds, which were moving quite fast that night. As Stan mentioned, those artifacts aren't necessarily bad ...


8

The photographer used a tripod, a long exposure, and a remote shutter release to help reduce vibrations. They also likely post processed back in some color enhancements. I would guess that they used either a graduated neutral density filter or a general ND filter to help with the bright light from the sun, but that is just a guess and cannot be said with ...


8

You should get a water tight pouch for it. As long as you won't be submerging it intentionally for extended times, these kinds of pouches should provide plenty of protection. They just need to keep the camera a) positively buoyant and b) protect it from getting wet on the surface.


7

Put your cam on a tripod, your picture in the background, make something up for the drops of water (bottle of water with a pinhole at the bottom, for example), and focus on the drops. This tutorial should get you started nicely: http://www.mcpactions.com/blog/2011/02/09/how-to-shoot-amazing-water-droplet-macro-photographs/


7

Some random thoughts: Keep in mind that illumination declines as the square of the distance from the source. For example, a fish twice as far away from the light source will have 1/4 the illumination (2 stops). So, be prepared for a lot of contrast and inaccurate metering (if fish move between metering and exposure). This may also make it tricky to ...


7

"Good lighting" for outside pictures is pretty much dusk or dawn. If you're getting a harsh reflection of the sun at this point, you should be able to easily rotate a bit and get the sun out of your frame. In fact, some of the best light is just before the sun rises and just after it sets. There's still plenty of light to shoot with - especially for ...


6

Yup, that's really all there is to it. But it takes some experimentation in each case, because the way the water moves is always different. So I've got a variable ND filter that I use. It's trial and error until I get an exposure that I like. It's not necessarily best to just go for the longest exposure possible. If you go for too long, it'll start to ...


6

You still need to expose correctly! Exposure is covered in depth in this answer. What you've done is increase one leg of the exposure, by using a longer shutter speed. Now you need to decrease the overall exposure by the same amount to get back to a properly-exposed image. So for example, if your camera's exposure meter told you to take a picture at 1/60 ...


6

If you want the flowy dreamy look, try to use a longer shutter speed and a tripod It depends on the water flow rate. In the sun, you may need to use a ND filter as stopping down will get you into diffraction-limited range. For some waterfalls (particularly violent ones), you may want the opposite: a very fast shutter speed. You will need to experiment ...


6

A circular polarizing filter will go a long way to eliminate the reflected light from the water. But you might also want to go in the opposite direction, and try to work out a composition that embraces the reflection, rather than eliminate it. For example, longer exposures that turn the glints into something more silky might get you something nice.


6

Your issue is related to the dynamic range of your camera. The sensor of a camera cannot capture such as wide variety of tones as your eyes, the range between absolutely white and absolutely black is much more reduced than the one you can see when you look at the waterfall scene. There is not much you can do about this, as it depends on your camera and in ...


6

There are a few options I've used to take cameras on the water canoeing and kayaking, both on flat water and through rapids. Here's the order I've done them in, so you know where I ended up: Get a dry bag. (I've used SealLine but there are many manufacturers.) Not one specific to the camera, just a big enough one to fit the camera. Keep the camera in the ...


5

Sounds like a fantastic shooting opportunity! A couple of suggestions that spring to mind: Use the surface reflection of the water. If there are lights nearby you'll get some great effects with them reflected across the water. Likewise that "brilliant architecture" you mention should look even better with a rippled reflection beneath it. If your camera ...


5

Apart from lighting it differently (covered in other answers), consider something like a small shot glass with the liquid in it. Change the composition to provide context clues that a clear liquid exists.


5

If you want the shot to be white, don't put a black bin bag in the bowl. If you want to add a touch of colour, try putting some coloured gels (or any coloured transparent plastic) over the flash. I'd try it without the diffuser as well.


5

This tutorial may help. http://photographylife.com/how-to-photograph-waterfall Besides the two ways described above on handling the extreme light levels, the use of a neutral density filter will also work. The tutorial touches on the subject of neutral density filters. Summary of tutorial: Create photos of waterfalls where the water looks silky smooth. ...


5

Unfortunately, your flashes won't be able to do the job. It's not that the DLites are altogether useless (they're really rather nice units), but the way they work — the way a lot of studio flashes work, and not just at the lower end — means that the flash duration at t 0.1 (the time when at the flash is firing at more than 10% intensity) is as short as it's ...


4

As others have said, it depends a lot on what kind of effect you want on the water and how much light is available. What I usually do is decide on how milky I want the water and then find out the time needed to get there. Note that the speed and volume of water impacts the result, so the thinner the stream/flux is the more time you need. Here is a shot ...


4

Those are easy actually but with the right tools. The key is that you need a long exposure which requires: Stable support like a sturdy tripod. Long shutter-speed which you dial-in in Shutter-Priority or Manual mode. A low ISO, to maximize shutter-speed. A small aperture, to maximize shutter-speed. A ND density filter should the previous two steps not ...


3

It's important to note at the outset that the way a viewer "reads" a photograph and perceives shape and depth is by the shadows and highlights. This image is nearly shadowless and the liquid featureless, which is good for certain things, but not for making objects of similar color stand out. A relatively hard light at a low angle might bring up reflections, ...


3

As real vanilla essence is coloured, and as that appears to be a real vanilla pod, why not colour the liquid somewhat? If you really really really had to make the fluid stand out as is you could try. Well directed shaped light at appropriate angle using a lens and mask to create a tailored reflection on the vanilla essence only. Not hard technically - ...


3

The answer is to stitch as much as you can automatically (by restricting the selection to images that contain enough well defined features to generate control points) and then fill in the gaps yourself using the water and sky images, simply arrange the images sensibly and blend the edges together (you shot with plenty of overlap, right?). You may even be ...


3

I was experimenting with this recently. Here are some pictures of a small cascade in western Massachussetts last fall. 1/2 second: 1 second: 4 seconds: Yes, I know some highlights got blown. This was mostly so I'd have a record of different tradeoffs with flowing water. The tradeoffs might be different with a larger waterfall like what Chris ...


3

Is it a longer exposure? Yes. Use a tripod or rest the camera on a rock to get a steady shot and choose a longer shutter speed (coupled with a smaller aperture if necessary). Experiment with different shutter speeds to get different effects.


3

You may find that shooting poolside is pretty similar to shooting anywhere else. This image was made with a softbox and a gold reflector. It could have been done with just the reflector but the extra light allowed me to let the water tones go a bit deeper. More than anything else, keep your gear dry, and that includes cords. Beyond that, it sounds like ...



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