Incense

by Bart Arondson

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47

The main reason is that a 100% viewfinder requires extremely careful adjustment to assure that the framing in the viewfinder exactly matches what will show up on the sensor. In most cases (I'm pretty sure all cases, really) this means they have a little adjustable frame just below the pentaprism that gets adjusted by hand to match up precisely with what the ...


41

What you're looking at through the viewfinder is actually the image from the lens projected onto a ground-glass viewing screen. You want the diopter to be adjusted so you can see that most clearly. Fortunately, this means that you can use the etched lines on the focusing screen, as well as the status information in the viewfinder, to adjust the diopter. ...


37

The basic difference is that a pentaprism is a solid block of glass. This means it's fairly heavy. It has mirroring material on all but two sides, so the light enters one side, gets reflected around inside, and then comes out the one other un-mirrored side. This means there are only 2 air/glass interfaces involved: one where light enters the prism, and one ...


25

It's probably a combination of two factors, firstly as you rightly suggest the focus screen plays a role - the view you see in the viewfinder effectively passes through a second aperture and so appears to be stopped down to about f/2.4 - f/2.8 So you can see bokeh through the viewfinder, it will just be much less pronounced due to the smaller effective ...


23

I wear glasses, and I'm a good photographer (so I'm told). Do you have trouble looking through the viewfinder? No. You get use to it after a while. Do you prefer contacts over glasses? I have no preference when taking pictures, however my preference in general is using my contacts. Do you find it harder to manually focus? Not because of ...


21

In general there are the following advantages of manual focussing via the optical viewfinder instead of the LCD: The viewfinder image is almost certainly sharper than the LCD, when viewing the entire image. This makes it easier to judge when something is in focus for the times when you need to be able to see the whole image at once (e.g. for a scene that ...


19

There are a variety of ways to display highlighted focus point indicators in the viewfinder. One of the earliest (yet still common) methods is to direct light back through the pentaprism to reflect off the rear-surface of reticles etched on the focusing screen or dedicated "superimpose plate". Displayed information is limited to highlighting the etched ...


18

And for a visual: Pentamirror Pentaprism


17

The viewfinder cover is for when you take long exposures on a tripod. You only want light to come in via the lens, not through the viewfinder. Normally your eye covers the viewfinder and keeps stray light from entering the camera that way. You really only need to use the viewfinder cover if there is bright light behind the camera. The mirror folds up and ...


17

It's important to realize that you don't actually look directly through the lens with an SLR! If you did, a periscope style arrangement would do just fine. What you are actually doing is looking at an image projected onto the focussing screen by the lens. This image is flipped left/right and up/down by the lens, and then up/down again by the main mirror. ...


16

here's a couple of potential disadvantages: blackout: Split-prism focusing screens tend to turn black in the center with slower lenses (usually f/5.6 or slower, depends on the screen). Unless you're using a slow lens, or setting the aperture manually, this probably won't be a major problem. effects on metering: Focusing screens can affect the camera's ...


15

That control adjusts the diopter, an optical adjustment to the viewfinder that allows folks with varying vision abilities to see things clearly. Think of it a bit like reading glasses - it allows for minor vision correction. The idea is that folks who have decent vision but might need minor correction can make an adjustment on the diopter so that as they ...


15

There are both advantages and disadvantages to EVFs. The very best ones with high-resolution and high-refresh rates are actually quite suitable for most uses when well-implemented. The main disadvantages are: Lag: There is a short lag between action happening in front of the camera and what you see. Dynamic-Range: EVFs are small LCD screens and have ...


15

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


14

Pixel peeped images aren't likely to look sharp unless you're viewing from a distance... Something to bear in mind. However, for manual focus improvement, you may want to consider a custom focussing screen such as the Katz Eye split prism screen. The basic idea here is much like a rangefinder camera, the prism splits the image when it is out of focus and ...


14

You will not see a change of brightness through the viewfinder as the aperture is only stopped down when the photo is taken. This allows the auto focus sensors to focus accurately as many cannot focus below certain apertures. It also provides more light for you to compose your shot with. Many DSLRs have a "Depth-of-Field preview" button that stops the ...


13

A SLR camera allows you to look through the lens and was created to reach WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get). It has a mirror box inside, and as a result, is much larger. Other developments include splitting the beam for auto-focus, etc. A rangefinder is a camera that has a rangefinder mechanism. This is a device that measures subject distance. ...


13

You certainly knocked the diopter adjustement out of place. It is there to compensate for people who need eye-glasses. With your eye looking through the viewfinder, adjust the knob on the upper right side until you see what is in focus clearly sharp.


12

The percentage dictates how much of the capture scene is visible to you before the capture. A true WYSIWYG situation is a 100% viewfinder because what you see with your eye will be what your final image gets. Anything less than 100% means that there are elements that will be captured in the scene that you cannot see at the time you look through the ...


12

Pros of using an EVF as opposed to the rear LCD screen: It is easier to see in direct sunlight. Holding the camera to the eye increases stability and comfort (especially with heavier lenses). EVFs offers diopter correction so users don't need to wear eyeglasses.


11

To get the definitive answer you can try to find and study the service or repair manuals for some cameras. For the stupid secrecy of the camera makers they are usually removed from the public access, but can be found elsewhere. This is a page from the Pentax K10D service manual; I don't know if you can figure from it how the LEDs themselves are positioned. ...


10

I've cleaned the inside (bottom side of prism) recently of my 30D. You can easily spot the viewfinder element when you take off the lens. I then use the same sensor swabs and eclipse fluid as I use for the sensor. I suggest you bend the sensor swab stick 90 deg so you can sweep is more easily across the viewfinder. I think I also cut off a bit of the sensor ...


10

Actually it is slightly more misleading. 480,000 pixels normally equals 1,440,000 dots but they do get away with only 480,000 actual dots (not pixels) by using something called field-sequential display which is basically 480,000 dots which change colors very fast, sending information for each primary color sequentially. There are only 480,000 dots but since ...


10

To me it sounds that you are not holding you eye close enough to the viewfinder. You should be able to see the edges of the image in the viewfinder clearly inside the frame of the viewfinder, as well as all the digits and indicators shown below the image. The viewfinder has a rubber lining, so that you comfortably can press your eye socket against it to get ...


10

In my experience, transitioning from 95% to 100% made a significant difference in my photography. The 5% can hide a decent amount. Shooting a lot of wide-angle means that there can be a lot in the missing 5%. It's easy with my 10-22mm on my 7D to capture the foot of my tripod in that extra 5% and I'd rather not crop the image. You can't easily judge what ...


10

Inside the viewfinder is a convex lens which enables your eye to focus on the screen. This works in exactly the same way as convex lens used in a pair of glasses to correct long sightedness. The power of this lens is usually adjustable via a small dial next to the eyepiece to account for differences in people's eyesight. Some people who wear glasses have ...


10

Well, the viewfinder itself is not going to cause infections, but some of the germs that cause conjunctivitis are highly contagious. If you're passing your camera to people with red eye, ask them to wash their hands and to use the LCD screen instead. In general, though, these germs are not particularly long-lived away from a human host. Just letting the ...


9

And on top of Matt Grum's almost exhaustive list, viewfinders won't eat up your batteries. (Except if the viewfinder is electronic, but that's luckily quite rare)


9

That is how many photos the camera can 'burst'. Changing the output file type (RAW, JPEG, RAW+JPEG) can affect this number. The dot is focus confirmation, it shows when AF has locked onto something. See the 'Viewfinder view' here: http://www.dpreview.com/previews/CanonEOS550D/page5.asp



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