Incense

by Bart Arondson

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22

There are two ways to do this... Method #1 This is the "easy" way. Since HD is (by definition) a frame size of 1920x1080, using a bigger set of images than 1920x1080 means that you can pan around in that frame using your post-production software of choice. For example, I'll often take timelapses using Medium sized JPEGs (4080x2720 on my Canon 5DmkII) and ...


17

Short answer: you can obtain some very good results, but only under certain conditions and absolutely not even close to what is shown in the linked video clip. My company, Amped Software, develops image and video processing software for forensic and intelligence applications, so basically we are the real world counterpart of the CSI software. With ...


17

Yes, still cameras can do things 4k video can't. I imagine that future cameras will go in the direction of the Canon 1D C, which has still photography and 4k video in the same body. From a photography standpoint, the advantages of shooting stills instead of frame-captured video include: Higher resolution. 4k video is around 8 megapixels, compared to the ...


15

No, for a CMOS based dSLR, the shutter remains open during the video recording, so the shutter in use is actually electronic. B&H photo, by the way, have a pretty good article on some of the concepts. It's in reference to video recorders, but much, not all, of it applies to dSLRs as well. Anyways, you do have an actuation for the act of flipping the ...


13

From Beginner's guide to HD video on dpreview.com Clip limits One of the main disadvantages with using a stills camera to shoot movies is the short recording times available for HD video; Nikons limit a single take to 5 minutes while Canons and European Panasonics stop after 29 minutes, 59 seconds. This limitation is due to the different ...


13

If the result you are looking for is a photograph, the short answer is no. The same equipment won't give better results with video than it can with stills. I think the apparent difference is due to exactly one thing: resolution. Try taking one of your still frames, resampling down so it's 1080 pixels tall, and then comparing. There isn't any inherent ...


12

I tried to list the pros and cons in a vacuum (ie ignoring external factors). For example, handycams have much better mics than than dSLR's, however you have the option of using either a dedicated recording system, or a solid quality mic. So the mic is still a con, but it's easily mitigated. Pros Access to awesome lens lineup Amazing low-light performance ...


10

4K video cameras will not be able to replace still cameras. First, 4K video resolution is only about 9 megapixels. Megapixels aren't everything, but in general more is good, and modern mid-grade to high-end still cameras clearly take advantage of more than that. Second, and more importantly, video cameras are optimized for video, and that has needs which ...


9

This is the stroboscopic effect. The change from light to dark indicates the shutter speed is not slow enough to capture one refresh cycle in the scoreboard; the relatively slow rate of change indicates some integral multiple of the camera's frame rate is close to the scoreboard's refresh rate. A slight change in your frame rate will only change the speed ...


9

While I don't think it is impossible to produce a video camera that could produce a good still, I also have yet to see a video camera actually do it. I think there are divers reasons as to why: Digital Video has, for a long time, been a low resolution format. Yes, the sensor is usually capable of much more than, say, 640x480, but what's going on is that ...


9

Video uses an electronic shutter, rather than the physical shutter used for photo taking, so each individual frame doesn't contribute to the actuation count in a DSLR. However, the mirror and shutter must open at the beginning of live view mode, and close at the end, so technically there is one actuation per time you enter live view.


9

As far as I know it is a legal thing to prevent extra import duties in the EU. Until Canon or anyone officially state that, it will remain speculation. It's not a heat issue, as a) if the sensor had heat problems they would likely occur before 30 minutes, and b) after one 30 minute capture the camera will allow you to immediately begin another 30 minute ...


9

You can't make something out of nothing, you have to have (or guess) some information in order to be able to enhance an image in any way. For example if you know the properties of the blurring function (and there is no image noise) then you can actually unblur a photo. However you rarely know the blur function and noise is always present so that severely ...


9

This is a good question and one I've recently wondered about, I found this article to be very informative once you ignore his complaints about 'cheap plastic photography lenses with no focus rings and variable apertures'. Lets assume we're talking about professional lenses here (L lenses etc), his points were Cine lenses have more of a 'oiled' or damped ...


9

The shutter you hear is a mechanical shutter and it cannot on a DSLR move fast enough to shoot at video speeds which is between 24 and 60 FPS. High-end mechanical shutters usually top at 12 FPS. The shutter used in video and high-speed drive on some cameras is an electronic shutter. There are no moving parts involved and hence no sound. The sensor simply ...


9

Older models like the 30D simply lack the hardware required to continually read from the image sensor. These models cannot support video, except at very low framerates by opening and closing the mechanical shutter continuously. Since the introduction of live view with the 1D mkIII in 2007, Canon DSLRs have been equipped with an electronic shutter and can ...


8

I recently purchased a 7D (with the intent of using its movie capability as well). I will share my experience. Like the 5DMkII, the 7D allows you to autofocus during shooting by pressing the shutter button/AF button. As che suggests in his answer for the 5D, the results are poor if you do this during your live shoot and I would definitely not recommend ...


8

I shoot video with two cameras, a Panasonic DVX100 (video camera) and a Canon T2i. I'll say that DSLR video looks great if you spend the time and effort but for ease of use a traditional video camera is leaps and bounds better. The big differences are: No autofocus with the DSLR. You can autofocus but you'll be waiting 4-5 seconds for it to hunt focus. ...


8

I have found that Class 6 is the slowest you can go for guaranteed non-stop HD Video recording, however I have found that some fast Class 4 cards (such as the SanDisk 8GB 'Ultra' Class 4 which I use primarily) can keep up pretty much the same. As well as actually recording on-location, the other area that Class 6 cards some into their own is back on your ...


8

Yes, and no. Your camera will shut itself down or put itself in a "cool-down" mode in order to save the sensor from overheating. I've had my Canon T1i warn me, and then shut things down in order to cool off. Could you develop hot pixels? Yes. (I would tend to the idea that any hot pixels are pixels that were prone to going hot anyway, and so you would have ...


8

Yes. Digital video cameras use these sensors, usually CCDs but CMOS too. These are the same designs use for still cameras but with less pixels, since even HD footage only needs 2 MP. For HD cameras, the shape of the sensor is often different to match the 16:9 aspect of widescreen footage. The major difference you will encounter are cameras labelled as 3 ...


8

I have had a similar experience on my Canon Rebel T2i, the recording just stopped after roughly 5 seconds or so. The reason is SD card. Though some cards say they are "class X", sometimes they don't perform at that, I would suggest following steps 1) First of all format your card once and try again. My guess is this will not help 2) Try video at a very low ...


7

I fully understand that my method probably is less 'working together' than you might be interested in, and this may not be exactly what you're looking for as an answer, but as a working wedding photographer, my take on wedding videography (the blunt version) can be boiled down to: "stay out of my shots, don't get in my way, and photography always takes ...


7

The reason that many people will recommend to shoot at double your framerate is because then the 'shutter angle' is 180 degrees. This is back from when film cameras were used. To cover the negatives whilst the next frame was 'wound on', a disc would spin, blocking the light as the negative moved. When the negative was in place, this disc would spin open ...


7

Supposedly, the 60D and T3i both allow you to hook up a USB hard drive and shoot directly to the drive without using an SD card. Your information is incorrect, there is no support in either the Canon 60D or the Canon T3i for being able to hook up a USB drive directly to the camera and shoot directly to it (still photographs or video) without some ...


7

In Mastering HD Video with your DSLR, the author claims that only CMOS sensors suffer from the rolling shutter effect. A quick search shows there are currently NO DSLR with CCD sensors, so you'll have to settle for something smaller. That does not leave many cameras that distinguish themselves for image quality. A few like the Olympus ZX-1, Nikon P7000, ...


7

The Canon 5D Mk II has two options, the camera body by itself or the camera body and the Canon 24-105mm f/4L IS USM AF Lens. Some stores such as Adorama also package additional items with the camera such as memory cards, batteries, bags, cleaning tools, or a grip. These are not kits put together by Canon, they are just bundling additional items along with ...


7

I have the 60D myself, and haven't experienced this. My first guess would be the write speed of the SD-card. If the card isn't fast enough you can't record video. I can't remember the required speed, but it's in the user manual. Edit: Just checked the manual, and the required speed for 60D is Class 6 SD card (page 171 in the manual).


6

The Sony Alpha A55 is a new ILC (SLD, actually) camera that can do this.



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