Serene Life

by garik

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34

I have a checklist. It mostly applies to buying classic (manual-focus) gear to use, but is probably of general use. It's a good idea to try all of these on your own gear first, since you know how you've treated it, and hence what effect you've had, and what "normal" gear feels and looks like when you're really looking closely. The Most Important Step ...


19

Yes it is. Including the box when reselling items increases their perceived value. You will often see LNIB in listings which means Like New In Box. It tells you are a more careful owner. This is particularly important for cameras or bodies in the case DSLRs and SLDs which have lots of small pieces (cables, caps, manuals) and depreciate in value quickly. I ...


18

Used gear is a very cost effective way to purchase high quality gear for the fraction of the price. I have bought and sold camera gear on ebay and have had a good time, but I also practice due dillegence. These are some tips that have helped me. Many of these apply to other items on ebay, while others are specific to camera gear. Check feedback. Just ...


17

Jump on the 5D for that price. The 40D is a good camera too but the 5D is a huge notch above due to its full-frame sensor, particularly for your applications: Portrait: Shallower depth-of-field which translates to more background blur. Street: Higher ISO sensitivity lets you shoot at faster shutter-speeds to freeze street action, which is valuable since ...


12

The easiest and safest way to sell photography equipment is to sell it to people you know! I've had the good fortune to be able to do this in the past. Failing that, I've also sold stuff on eBay and not had any problems. You only ship when the buyer's funds are in your paypal account, and using an insured & signed for delivery system prevents them from ...


10

All lenses will show dust with a flashlight shown through them, even brand new ones. Here are a couple of detailed articles on how to evaluate a used lens, from Calvin Foo and TechARP. Finally, scratches matter less than you might think. Check out this lens.


9

Other than selling it to people you know (as pointed out by Matt) the easiest and safest way would be to a camera shop that deals in second hand equipment. You walk in there with your kit, they look at it and you walk out with money. Of course you will get less money than if you cut out the middleman, but that's your trade off to make.


8

Consider looking at value and not just price. There are substantial differences among UV and haze filters; some of them will significantly degrade your photos under some circumstances and most of them have some measurable effects in any photo. Useful reviews appear at http://www.kenandchristine.com/gallery/1054387/1 (which is well illustrated--some of ...


8

I have been buying and selling cameras and lenses on eBay, it's been fine. This is how I decide if I will buy an item: The seller must have at least 99.5% positive feedback (Also note the number of feedbacks, 100% positive out of only 10 feedbacks may not be very reliable.) Read the feedbacks, especially the negatives and make sure there is nothing ...


8

A couple of things: Make sure the obvious stuff like autofocus, aperture control, shutter speed actually work. Check number of shutter actuations. Most bodies have a mean time between failure (MBTF) number for this, so check how close it is. Make sure all connections work. USB, HDMI (if present), Video out. Battery, charger. Be aware you might need to ...


8

Definitely get the 5D - the 40D will give you a more robust body your current 450D, slightly better AF etc. but you will effectively be taking the same photos. Due to the shallower depth of field and lack of a crop you can take photos that are literally impossible with the other two cameras. edit: To qualify the above, in the studio the detail and tonal ...


8

Since you did not tell us anything about how you are 'trying', I can't really give you a complete answer. Now, it is a good lens and has a nice price-point too. Things to consider: Price. You need a to offer a discount compared to the lowest price from a reputable source. Check BHPhoto and Adorama if you are in the US, otherwise the local equivalent. ...


8

I'm sorry that all of this is based on US situations, feel free to edit anything that doesn't apply. Hopefully this gives you an idea though. I looked briefly into this since there seems to be demand for local pick-up and drop-off in my area. Here are a couple things to keep in mind. Insurance Insurance starts is around $.50 - $1.00 per $1000 of ...


7

As with anything you buy used, wear and tear can be a drawback. Flash heads and key electronics do have a limited life, though I can't recall having a flash 'bulb' die on me, usually some other, unknown issue takes their life before then. For the record, I purchased a used 420EX that was used as a rental unit by my local store. So I assumed going in it had ...


7

I have a 1Ds mkII and an original 5D. The fact I still have them is mainly due to the fact that they're worth a lot more to me that I would get from selling them. In other words I think they're probably undervalued on the second hand market. The main reason I say this is that the look you get from a full frame sensor is in many ways unobtainable with a ...


6

From the bad experiences I've had you have to look at external signs of abuse first. If the lens is too dented, then it's a sign that the owner didn't treat it well. Then there's the fungus that can build up inside the lens if it's not taken care of properly over time. You have to look through the lens against a bright light looking for black spots that ...


6

You might want to take a look at KEH. They may not give you the absolute highest price, but they are quite reputable, and you can certainly feel safe going through them.


6

Personally, I would say yes to keep boxes and packaging of lenses, not so much for tripods. If you'll ever ebay lenses, or want to ship a L lenses for inspection or realignment. Having the original packaging save you time and extra cash buying new bubble wraps.


5

Consider buying from a reputable used camera dealer like KEH instead of eBay. You might pay a bit more, but you will also get a warranty, a no-questions-asked return period, and gear which is graded on a reliable and respected condition scale.


5

Their website is janky, but 2Filter has pretty good prices.


5

Shamelessly stolen from PentaxForum's RicoRico, but may be of interest: http://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/pentax-lens-articles/59245-pawnshop-lenses-other-used-lenses-buyers-guide.html BRIEFLY: The quick-and-dirty approach. I walk into the slightly seedy premises, wander over to the photo gear display, look over the Pentaxian offerings. I discard focal ...


5

The first thing is to buy used from reputable sellers. Many Buy and Sell forums have a feedback system which allows you to make an informed decision. The next step is to do your homework. Used lens hold their value, unless badly mistreated, or made obsolete (in some cases this can increase the value). If the lens is way off what you find on B&S Forums ...


5

The well-regarded used camera dealer KEH has categories for tripods and light stands. I could not find one for backgrounds in a quick look.


5

Beyond ebay & Craigslist, here are a couple other ideas: Watch for refurbs at Adorama. I think you can find these from some other vendors, too. At a minimum, use these prices as absolute top-dollar for used equipment (if you can buy it refurbished for $X, you wouldn't want to pay more for it used). Adorama (as well as many camera shops) also carries ...


5

Rebel X (EOS-500/Kiss XS without pop-up flash) is a fairly recent entry level body. It uses EF lens mount, so the lenses should work fine with current Canon DSLRs. The flash hot-shoe is also compatible with current models, although Rebel X did not support E-TTL. The flash will work on a Canon dSLR, but the features it will offer depend on the flash and ...


5

KEH and B&H Photo would be the big two in the US. Other big camera dealers like Adorama also sell used gear. B&H offers a 90 day warranty on used gear. KEH has a 6 month warranty and 14 day no questions asked return policy


4

also be aware that in many cases, these are "unauthorized" imports (aka grey market), and you may buy something that the manufacturer won't accept the warranty on. grey market is not necessaryily bad (b+H and others sell international units, too), but make sure you get all the details about the unit including it's source. No fun to get something with ...


4

Personally, I just try just taking photos of a nice smooth surface (white paper for example) at the smallest possible aperture. Similar to sensor dust, scratches won't be apparent at the larger apertures (small f numbers). Of course, that all depends on whether or not it's possible to use the lens. That only covers scratches though. A used lens may have ...



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