Open

by damned truths

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

44

Having used both lenses I'd say no it's not worth the upgrade. The f/1.4 version is two thirds of a stop faster, which means where you'd use ISO 800 before you'd theoretically be able to use ISO 500. That sounds good, however that's only in the centre of the frame, the corners get significantly darker wide open. I rarely use mine wide open so for me there's ...


31

If you only want to carry one lens, and want your new lens to have at least the same capabilities as your kit lens, you have two basic options: a fast zoom, or a superzoom. Fast zoom This would cover a very similar focal length range as your kit lens; generally 17-50mm or 17-55mm, but have a constant aperture of f/2.8. Not a big deal at the wide end, but ...


18

A wonderful thing about photography is that it's multiple hobbies in one. You can enjoy the act of capturing moments distinct from the production of final images. You can develop your skill in print-making without taking pictures yourself. You can collect photographs taken by the masters. You can participate in contests. And, you can enjoy the gear ...


13

The answer is, it depends. Generally, firmware upgrades can Correct flaws in the original firmware. For instance, if there were a metering mistake in the original firmware, that can get fixed. Expose new software functionality. I'm thinking of CHDK here, that brings new functionality to canon powershot cameras (such as RAW shooting, timed shooting, ...


13

I used to have a 450D, now I have a 7D. I will speak from experience. The 450D is of course an upgrade to the 400D and the changes/improvements between the 400D and the 7D will probably be greater than between the 450D and the 7D, so add that up while reading this. To begin, as you most likely are aware, lenses matter more for image quality than the actual ...


12

The higher-end cameras first all have dual-control dials, this will be true if you go to a 7D or even a 60D. This and added buttons lets you operate the camera much faster since there are more direct controls and less reasons to enter the menu system. For the 7D but not the 60D, you get a 100% coverage viewfinder. This feature alone is worth the upgrade if ...


11

For pretty much all of the types of photos you wish to take, the 5D II will be a better camera than the 7D. The 7D excels at action photography, with its superb AF system, high burst rate, and high resolution. It is an ideal camera for sports, wildlife, and birds in flight. Its high resolution sensor makes it easier to get good high res crops. The APS-C ...


10

Don't upgrade unless you have a specific issue with the D40 like number of pixs, burst rate e.t.c. It's still a great camera and deserves to click until it dies.


10

Well, it's not just what's in CS6. It's what's in CS4-6. You can look up the feature lists and comparison's on Adobe's site to help you decide. We can't tell you if the value is enough for you to move forward. But some helpful things... Content aware actions are extremely helpful Camera Raw is much more capable and works with the modern cameras Speed has ...


10

I recently upgraded from a D40 to a D800. That's quite a jump for someone who considers themselves just an enthusiast. While I won't waste your time going into the why behind my purchase, I can tell you that the D800 has reinvigorated my interest in photography not only from a technical competency point of view (this camera has far more to learn about) but ...


10

It is very unlikely that Canon will dump the EF-S mount any time soon. As you note it was derived from the EF mount, which is significantly older but still going strong. In fact, Canon's introduction of the EF-M derivative last year, if anything, indicated Canon is nowhere near phasing out the system. Camera mounts are not replaced nearly as often as other ...


9

Here is how I look at body upgrades (when budget is a factor): Upgrading makes sense if there are specific features that your current body lacks that would benefit you. Said another way, is your body holding you back? As an example: perhaps you do a lot of indoor, low-light event photography and the ISO range of your body is a hinderance. In that case, the ...


9

The 550 has enough quality for the images. So the bump in the road is your lens. I would go for a better quality lens and keep the 550 body. Then post-processing is your last stop on your way to good quality shots. That said, the body is a tool, and if you feel that you cannot create good enough images that maybe your problem is the camera body and how it ...


8

Well, upgrades depends on your need. Something what you consider an upgrade might not be the same for a lot of others. You need to think a few things and get decided on the specs you'd like the new lens on and make a priority list of the features. What focal length are you planning on? Do you need a telephoto or a wide angle? If you shoot birds, you need ...


8

I trust Canon is sane enough and tests all official firmware upgrades not to brick your camera. As long as you follow the guide that comes with the firmware (instructions like "don't remove battery during upgrade") you should be completely safe.


8

If you don't have an investment in the system, there's no compelling reason to stay with the same brand when upgrading. Since you've had your camera for a while, you should think about what you like about it and what you're missing. It sounds like there are a few things about the Canon model that really appeal to you, so that's good. I'd suggest making an ...


8

Unless you have a limitation in mind with the body you have, whether that be autofocus speed, autofocus accuracy, low-light ISO performance, fps - then you should probably invest in lenses, flashes/triggers, tripod and/or software. Lenses make a much bigger difference in sharpness, contrast, clarity than upgrading your body will. Lighting is second in how ...


7

The D90 is an excellent camera, and much less expensive now that the D7000 has been announced (and it starts shipping next week). The D7000 has some amazing specs, but hasn't been reviewed thoroughly yet. If you want to stay DX, I'd say those are your best bets. You can get a pretty great upgrade for between $700 and $1200. Spend the rest of your ...


7

It depends on what you want out of a body upgrade. If you want certain features, better build quality, handling, ergonomics, or user interface, then you should pick one of those bodies. If you want better pictures, then do not upgrade your body. I think you would get a lot more out of buying better glass and a lighting setup(for portraits and indoor) ...


7

Nobody's actually asking what you use the camera for, so there's no way to tell whether or not the upgrade will benefit you. I recently bought a T3i to be a second body along with a 7D; buying a second 7D seemed overkill for what I was using it for. Whether upgrading to the 7D makes sense depends on what you're doing with it. How often do you hit a ...


7

You should have a need in mind when looking for a new camera instead of just desiring a new camera. If your current camera fits your needs, keep it and put the money towards new lenses or something. For example, I recently purchased a newer (more pro-ish camera replacing my 1000d with the 60d). I wanted it because it has a much better autofocus, has the ...


6

Matt's analysis can't be beat, so I won't argue with the science. Having owned both lenses (shot with the 1.8 for 3 years, then moved to the 1.4 for the past 4) I have to say that the 1.8 is the best value for your money. However I did find the focussing speed and build quality of the 1.4 worth the move for me. I don't mind a bit of softness when shooting ...


6

Here are a couple of different common paths you could go that are sub-$1000. But as everyone is telling you, usage is the easiest way to narrow down your choices to something you actually need, rather than something you just want. The easiest way to really start considering an "upgrade" from the kit lens is to consider in what ways the kit lens frustrates ...


6

There is a bug in Lightroom 4 that can cause you to lose your point tone curve settings in existing images, as detailed here. This is a serious bug, if you use point curves. There are other relatively minor issues detailed at that link as well. The behavior of Pick/Reject flags changes in Lightroom 4. Now when you flag an image, the flag is global, instead ...


6

Before looking at the next camera, make sure you have the best lenses for your needs. A good macro lens for example will make much more difference than a change in camera. The same is true of long fast lenses. If you have enough good lenses though, it gets hard to change camera brands, so the first factor to consider is if you are willing to change brands ...


5

The difference can be huge or unnoticeable depending on how you use the camera - for example, the faster burst rate means nothing if you never use burst mode or can make a huge difference if you always shoot in burst mode - also better low light performance means nothing if you always shoot in bright sunlight. You shouldn't be asking if the camera body is a ...


5

I would say, whilst not necessarily L lenses, that you would indeed be better off buying better lenses to go on your existing camera. The 550D is a very capable camera, and I certainly had some L glass (the 24 f/1.4 and 100-400) on my 7D before moving up to full frame. But there may be alternatives to L that you hadn't considered - two EF-S lenses for a ...


5

The EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 isn't an "L" lens -- that's absolutely true. Before dismissing it, though, I think it's important to remember that Canon won't label any EF-S lens an "L" since it wouldn't work on their pro bodies. The performance of the lens, though, is considered to be excellent -- definitely competitive with "L" offerings, and very possibly even ...


5

Unlike Canon where you should crop the image by yourself, Nikon FX cameras have a DX crop mode for using DX lenses. On an FX-format camera with a DX lens mounted, the camera will automatically engage its built-in DX crop mode, thus recording an image only from the center section of the sensor.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible