Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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22

Likely culprits, in order of probability: Bad SD card (by far the most likely, especially with cheap cards). Bad cable or card reader (more common than you might think). Something wrong on your computer (many things can go wrong!). A bad connection inside the camera. Something horribly wrong with the camera's electronics. The "bad card" scenario is, ...


22

Short answer: Current autofocus systems only work when the AF area contains high contrast. The places where it doesn't work don't contain enough, and the areas which do work, do. Here's what's going on in more detail: There are two different types of autofocus systems in modern cameras. One is the contrast-detection AF, which is used in most point and ...


18

Some dust spots on the sensor will absolutely not shift with air-pressure (blowing) alone. To shift them you need to wet clean the sensor. I was nervous the first time I did this as I can understand most people would be. But it is not that difficult or risky, basically it involves wiping the sensor assembly with a soft rubber "wand" with a cleaning fluid ...


18

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


16

I'm willing to bet that that's dust on your sensor, not on the lens. If you stop down to f/22, that can help to confirm that assertion, one way or the other. My sensor dust would really show up at the smaller apertures. If they are indeed on the sensor (and they really look like the dust spots I got on my d70 and d200), you can try some of the Visible ...


15

The "Job nr" is not an error message, it's a status message. You have enabled the in-camera long-exposure noise reduction - the "nr" part of the message. With noise reduction enabled, after you create a long exposure, the camera takes about the same amount of time to process the image, apply noise reduction, and write image to the card. If you're creating ...


15

Re. your answer - you don't have to have the focus set to Manual just because you're in Manual mode, but autofocus systems generally don't work in the dark. Therefore the camera will fail to focus and refuse to take a picture. By switching to manual you remove that problem. Switching to Auto mode may allow autofocus because it turns the AF illuminator on. ...


14

I would say at least for most practical purposes the answer is no. First of all, you only get intense heat where the light comes (at least close to) in focus, which does not happen inside the lens. Second, you only get heat when the light is absorbed -- but a typical lens transmits virtually all the light, which translates to absorbing essentially none of ...


14

Troubleshooting a lens: Lens Toggle: Make sure the toggle on the lens is firmly in the AF position. Contacts: Check the metal contacts on the lens to make sure they are clear of debris and are clean. Ring: Make sure the focus ring isn't obstructed. It should move freely when on MF and become more firm when on AF (for your lens, not all lenses do this). ...


13

Unless your unit is defective, by default most DSLRs will not release the shutter if: Focus has not been acquired. The flash is charging The buffer is full 1 and 2 can be over-ridden using the custom settings. If you go to MF or AF-C (which defaults to Release-Priority) you should not experience this due to #1. If the flash is down (and no flash is ...


13

You certainly knocked the diopter adjustement out of place. It is there to compensate for people who need eye-glasses. With your eye looking through the viewfinder, adjust the knob on the upper right side until you see what is in focus clearly sharp.


12

Not only do you need new batteries, but what you want is low self-discharge NiMHs. Like the name says, they have a better not-in-use retention of charge, reducing frustrations like this. They generally have lower capacity than "regular" NiMHs, but unless you're planning to recharge and then use them up immediately, it's worth it. The common brand name here ...


12

You're exactly right — it's the same thing as a monitor pixel error, but on your camera's sensor rather than on an LCD screen. * You can either fix it in post-processing (automatically, with many RAW-processing packages) or have it mapped out with the camera's firmware. If you're lucky, your camera model includes a built-in feature to do that yourself in ...


12

The only sound that would come from the sensor itself would be a self-cleaning function, which only happens when you run the self cleaning, or turn the camera on/off. The sensor vibrates to shake off dust. This would not be happening when you are shooting. When you half press, the sounds you might hear would be from the lens AF motor or image ...


12

There is definitely something very wrong here. That's not a focus or DOF issue, but looks like the lens suffers from extremely strong field curvature. It's normal for a lens to be sharper in the center than around the edges, and this effect gets stronger with wide open aperture and at the extreme ends of the zoom range (your last sentence indicates that you ...


11

The phase detection autofocus on your D7000 works by calculating the offset between an observed brightness pattern seen by a pair of miniature sensors, consisting of single rows of pixels, that make up each AF point. In order to be able to find a reliable match and thus measure the offset there needs to be a strong variation in the brightness observed over ...


11

Looks like a shutter malfunction (which fits with it only appearing at certain shutter speeds). The shutter is made of a series of metal blades, it looks like one of these blades is misaligned, which is exposing that part of the sensor for longer than it should be, hence the bright area. You can have the shutter replaced at a Canon service centre.


11

You're hearing the IS start to activate.


10

There really isn't all that much you can do with lenses yourself without making things worse. It sounds like something mechanically is wrong, and the only way to fix that is going to be to open up the lens. I would take it to a Nikon authorized repair shop. If you are in the US, this form will take you to the list of authorized repair shops.


10

Another possibility is if you were using a filter, such as a UV filter, to take this shot, this can sometimes cause effects such as this when light sources are involved.


10

If you have the RAW file from the shot, absolutely. Just pop it open in what ever RAW processor you use. Active D-Lighting basically applies a slight HDR-like effect. The effect should only be applied to the jpeg.


10

It's very possible that the shutter is sticking. I had this problem a lot of years ago with a Yashica 35mm film camera and lost a lot of shots to the shutter misbehaving, an expensive proposition with film. Anyways, the trigger seemed to have been a trip to a hot and fairly dusty location in Aruba, maybe the result of some sand or something getting caught in ...


9

That looks like a typical dust spot. How blurry the spot is depends on the distance between the filter in front of the sensor and the actual sensor (which is constant for each camera model), and the aperture used. For a smaller aperture (higher f-number) the spot gets sharper. The sensor cleaning function may remove some dust, but I read a test a while ...


9

One other thing - don't mix your batteries with different specs. In your case, mixing 2500mAh batteries with 800mAh batteries will be causing you problems.


9

Because of the pixel density I would say. Your 50D had the highest pixel density in Canon's lineup when it was released, at 4.5MP/cm2. At that density the lens becomes the limiting factor, you need good glass. A few reviews pointed out that the image quality of the 50D wasn't much better than the 40D it was replacing actually, with a density of 3.1 MP/cm2. ...


9

If the pictures are all pure black (as in every pixel is colour 0,0,0) then that sounds like a fairly terminal electronics problem. If you're getting black photos where noise is visible if you boost the exposure on the computer then it sounds like a shutter malfunctioning. If the viewfinder is not blacking out momentarily it could be the mirror is staying ...


9

There is a little microswitch in the hotshoe that detects an external flash -- this may have become stuck, or got a piece of grit blocking it. If you cannot see anything under the rails, you may have to take it to your local friendly Canon authorised repair centre, but if you can see some grit, you may be able to carefully remove it with a cocktail stick or ...


9

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around ...


9

Almost certainly those LEDs are flickering. There are valid reasons why LED displays are designed so that only some of the LEDs are on at any one time, but I won't go into the electronics here. Apparently your shutter speed was faster then the total LED refresh interval, so the camera only caught some of the LEDs on. Use a slower shutter speed, like 1/50 ...



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