The Perfect Sunrise

by NULLZ

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15

My apologies for linking to Strobist all the time, but as it happens there is a recent post just about that. He lists PocketWizard Plus II Transceiver as the best and most reliable, followed by RadioPopper JrX, AlienBees CyberSyncs, and Elinchrom Skyports. You also might want to check out RadioPopper PX, which looks like it might be able to trigger slave ...


10

Pocket Wizards (as well as several other brands of remote triggers) can also be used to trigger remote cameras as well. http://www.pocketwizard.com/inspirations/tutorials/remote_camera_trigger/ Are you renting all of this equipment?


7

I think an updated answer is called for. :) When integrating studio strobes with speedlights, there are two things to consider. Whether you want more control than manual-only triggers give you for either the strobes and/or the speedlights, and how robust you want the triggers to be. Are there OEM/3rd party triggers to command the studio strobe? Some ...


7

Good radio wireless remotes, like PocketWizards, fire extremely fast, well within the time the shutter opens; I pushed mine a long ways past 1/1000 before I saw problems with a black bar beginning to creep into the image. I think they're both adequate for normal situations. It's when you get into adverse situations that you'll see one work better than the ...


6

'N3' refers to the connector type for the remotes... It is a proprietary Canon standard, and Canon remotes which are compatible with the 60D have 'N3' in their model numbers, specifically: Canon Remote Switch (RS-80N3) Timer Remote Controller (TC-80N3) There are also several companies that make N3 compatible wired remotes, including offerings from Adidt, ...


6

There is an extremely easy to do this. Simply use an IR trigger with both cameras facing the same way. I've used this to trigger two Pentax K-7 for 3D photography (and once a K-5 and K-7). The 5D Mark II seems to support an IR trigger as well. EDIT: For some reason, I read you had 2 cameras or maybe I thought you just wrote in binary ;) but you can ...


5

I was in a friend's studio a few weeks back and he was firing a setup of 12 1Ds and 5Ds using Pearstone FreeWave Wireless Remote Shutter Release to trigger them all at once from 1 transmitter. He was doing still product shots where he set the cameras at various angles to the products and would get a bunch of angles at once with different length lenses so he ...


5

I use this: http://amzn.com/B002W3IXZW from cowboy studio or if you have more money I would get this: http://amzn.com/B00BBQ8IDS from Pocketwizard which was just released. Many people also praise the inexpensive Yongnuo transmitter/triggers. The 60D even has a built in wireless transmitter. The 60D's built-in flash can act as a controller or commander to ...


4

Optical slaves are considerably quicker - easily measured with a 'scope. Radio slaves offer longer range and more varied working conditions - unaffected by bright light and so on. Good radio slaves introduce a delay of around 600 microseconds (0.6 milliseconds), some are slower - I measured mine at 1.2ms, which surprised me (it was longer than I expected). ...


4

Your question is what's FASTER, radio or optical?; the answer is that it depends on the trigger more than the mechanism. Radio waves and light are essentially the same thing and therefore travel at the same speed. Radio triggers include more circuitry and processing since they often accept multiple channels, etc. PocketWizard advertises that the response ...


4

If you only want to use the flashes in manual mode, I recommend radio triggers. You can pick up a set with one transmitter and two receivers for around $30USD. I use this set occasionally. If I needed them on a daily basis I would invest in something a little heavier duty, but these have never failed to fire, and are fairly easy on the batteries.


3

This Canon site article: http://www.learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2012/eos6d_builtin_flash_alternative.shtml discussed a nice alternative--a 90ex speedlight which can act as a Master unit with a 430exII as a slave. I have just ordered one to use with my Canon 6D and will see if it works as indicated. I also like that it is quite small, and can ...


3

In addition to a radio trigger, you might consider an off camera shoe cord. They come in lengths from 1.5' to 10'. They are a very economical option for getting the flash off camera while still retaining TTL capability. This shot was taken using an off shoe cord in a dimly lit banquet hall. I hand held the flash with my left hand about 18-24" away from the ...


3

There are 3 ways that I can think of to achieve this. The most reliable way would be to rig all of the cameras remote shutters together, and trigger them off. This should work in any condition, but it would require some kind of custom gear, which knowing Jay, probably isn't what he wants to do. The IR solution proposed could work, but it would likely take ...


3

The primary reason to go with the manufacturer's product is 100% compatibility. With 3rd party/other vendors, you need to be sure of the correct model (especially as the Panasonic supports a different, 4 pin connector - others use 2/3 pins IIRC). There are quite a few which work though, and are marked compatible with the DMW-RSL1. If you're really in need ...


3

I have some of the "eBay" triggers that I bought a year ago. I found them at mpex.com (Midwest Photo Exchange). They are the Cactus V2's and are $30 for a receiver and transmitter. I feel like it was a good deal, considering the price of a PocketWizard. They obviously are not as reliable as the pro equipment but for an amateur like myself, they work ...


3

The only difference between the two packages you're looking at is the shutter release cable that's included in the package--the radio triggers themselves are identical units. But since Nikon uses two different shutter release connectors depending on whether the camera is entry-level or prosumer, there are two separate shutter release cables, for when you ...


3

It could be that the LED flash doesn't ramp up fast enough to register the flash, or put out enough light when it does flash. Usually, optical triggers detect the rate of change of the light level to detect when a flash has occurred (as opposed to an increase in the ambient light level). I assume that you have the light sensor on the flash reasonably well ...


2

This was of some interest to me because I have been getting the horizontal bars, so I did a lot of research and some testing. My camera has a nominal sync speed of 1/200 and I am using Britek PS-200 and PS-250 strobes which have a flash duration of 1/1500s. My interest was because I noticed a significant difference when firing just one strobe with a radio ...


2

What's better? That depends on a few factors... However, when considering the pros and cons, you have to look at a few different things. A couple that I found really relevant in this was: TTL support. The major brands offer this through optical control, in your camera, but that does mean your camera either uses the built in flash or a mounted speedlight to ...


2

The Canon 60D which I own, purchased in USA, has a 2.5mm remote connector just as EOS Rebel models have, not the N3 type connector in the high-end Canon models.


2

Or just go with the ultra-cheap YongNuo RF-602, which give you a lot of bang for the buck. I own two sets and find them good enough for serious work. Before I owned a set of Cactus V2 Trigger (one sender, two receivers), and these gave me a lot of problems: Sometimes they did not trigger the flash. Sometimes they triggered the flash without me taking a ...


2

I've previously used Cactus V2s which were good enough but occasionally failed in front of people which makes you look bad and gets you in a flap. Not good. I've just ordered a set of Cactus V5. If you remember to give me a nudge next week, I'll let you know how I get on with them. There's no TTL stuff, but the range and reliability is supposedly improved. ...


2

Are you talking about something like this? http://www.breezesys.com/MultiCamera/index.htm


2

There were several early EOS cameras that used the T3 connector for both wired remotes and to connect a vertical shutter release. Many of those early models are listed at this link that was current as of 1993. The vertical release was only available directly from Canon Professional Services and was not distributed via the Canon dealer network. By the year ...


2

There is no essential difference between the two types of connections other than the shape and arrangement of the connectors. The N3 socket on the camera body is probably easier to make weather sealed than the E3 socket that is basically a 2.5mm stereo mini jack. Both have three wires: a ground, a half press, and a full press. That is, in fact, the case ...


1

I suggest triggering one of the flashes through a wired connection, and putting the other flash in optical slave mode (so it's triggered by the first flash firing). You need a flash shoe to PC adapter. ("PC" is unrelated to personal computers, it's a standard for flash connectors) a PC cable of the required length.


1

I do confirm the 60D works with the 430ex/ex II directly with no additional trigger. The 430ex is a slave. You can drive up to 3 groups of flashes (A, B, C) with individual power ratio.


1

Take a look into triggering the Nikon SB-600 using the optical slave mode, or using it in conjunction with an optical slave trigger. It isn't exactly rock solid in the performance area but is very widely supported.



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