Moonlight

by Jakub

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6

I only have a fairly small aluminum tripod (53 cm / 21" folded, sans head), which fits inside my suitcase and is more than sturdy enough to take any abuse the luggage handlers might dish out, so I've never had any trouble with it. I assume yours is both bigger and more expensive, though, which could make things more problematic. That said, I've had similar ...


4

Comparing super zoom lenses is really not very much different then comparing any other lens. For super zoom lenses you need to understand that in general they are all based on compromises. The big three that you will have to choose between are optical quality, size, and price. Typically you get to choose either 1 or 2 of the 3, but not all three. Size, ...


2

You may consider Canon's new EF-S 10-18mm, released just a few months ago. It's really lightweight, has image stabilization (probably only one with IS from your choice. Optics are really surprisingly good, has less chromatic aberration than 10-22mm. Build quality is not near L lens (or 10-22mm), but is really ok and seems durable. For it's price (300$) is ...


2

Ideally, the answer is have the film get hand inspected each time. Always. X-rays are just like any other type of light for film - it exposes the film (and it gets through the film canister). You will occasionally see statements like "security check point that said film under ISO 800 would be unharmed going through the checked luggage x-ray machine" which ...


1

See also: What should I look for when shopping for my first DSLR? Here are the questions I think you need to ask yourself before buying any new camera. What's my budget? The amount of money you can spend on camera gear will probably be the biggest limitation on getting any specific camera. It will sway your decision on whether or not you would prefer ...


1

I marked this to be closed as its primarily opinion based. Personally, I would much prefer to have a 10-24 and 70-300 over the 18-200. For me, for such an awesome trip, 18 wouldn't be wide enough to make me happy and 200 wouldn't be long enough. (300 wouldn't be long enough, either, but thinking about staying light...) It's a personal choice. Your ...


1

Rather than supply links, which may or may not stay around for some time, I would suggest considering that many photographers use studio lighting in remote settings without a readily available electrical outlets. While some are really big budget and may bring generators, many just use battery packs for their lights. So, some lighting makers, such as Paul C. ...


1

I recall that the x-ray machines for carry-ons were marked "Film Safe". This page seems to confirm that, though the person still recommends hand checking.


1

My first thought for about $1000 is to get the 24-105L and leave the kit lens at home. Once you shift from that kit lens to a higher quality lens you'll wonder why you waited. If you really want to keep the kit lens in your kit, then the Sigma 10-20 is a good idea. I haven't used the Canon 10-22 but have heard good things about it. Don't forget that if ...


1

When picking a lens, you need to consider what it is you want to shoot with that lens. For street/travel, most folks would probably opt for an ultrawide zoom (if they're interested in cityscapes/landscapes or shooting in smaller spaces), a superzoom (for versatility), and/or a few wide-to-normal fast primes (street, night, and across-the-table shooting). ...


1

Generally, if you do not already know what to buy - then you should not buy anything. I'd suggest to look thoroughly into learning more about photography in general instead. As you're "on" with that you will - with time - find out exactly what you're lacking/missing... and by that learn what to look for in an eventual new camera - if you get to that ...



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