Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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13

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


8

My direct experience with travel matches advice I was given years ago: expect to take the same kinds of photos, with the same type of equipment, as at home. If you have a particular lens that is rarely needed then there's no reason to expect that this will finally be the time to use it. The same goes for tripods, field notebooks, or any other new habit that ...


6

In Europe the voltage is 230v, so if your adapter operates outside the 220-240v range you have to buy some kind of adapter doing the conversion. Also, Italy, France, Switzerland and Austria all have different power outlet shapes, but there is a common plug called "Europlug" which works on all four countries ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europlug ). Get an ...


6

Here are some options, I've personally had both huge successes and miserable failures with all of those techniques so you have to choose the one that fits the situation best: Find shade - A tree or a building that is just out of frame can do a very good job at preventing harsh sunlight (but you have to be careful not to blow up the background). Use some ...


6

Yes, this charger will work. You can see from the specifications in the picture that it will accept a range of voltage from 100 to 240V. That includes Japan on the lowest side, and the US / North America at 110, and Europe at 230V. You will just need a physical plug adapter, which you can get pretty much anywhere. The countries you are visiting all have ...


5

Here are various reasons that I may choose to use a hand strap, shoulder strap (never around the neck), monopod, or tripod: Hand Strap - I don't currently have a hand strap and have not used one for a couple of years, my gear is just too heavy at this point. Fast lenses on prosumer DSLRs are too heavy for me to carry with just a hand strap for 5 hours at a ...


5

This is based on my preference and my shooting style My guess is that the 18-55 mm IS II will suffice for most of the shot you are going to take. Since it is day time and it is a lens that will have all of the focal length I would use for the listed type of shots: 1 - 3 persons: I prefer to use a focal length of about 85 mm which is about the 55 end ...


4

A reflector is not necessarily an item specifically made for the purpose, but can be any surface that reflects light. Place your subjects right next to a light-colored or white surface that is lit by the sunlight. This will act as your reflector. Direct your subjects to look away from the sun, so that the light on their faces is the reflected light from ...


4

Since each leg section is nested in the next when the monopod is compacted, splitting it in two won't result in either section being much smaller than entire monopod. Each section appears to be around 22-23 inches long. What you can do is remove the head, but you're not going to gain much there. Looking at the parts diagram published by Manfrotto, it appears ...


3

There isn't really any comparison between a shoulder strap or a monopod. A shoulder strap is used to carry a camera when not in use and to keep it easily accessible. A good shoulder strap is highly recommended as it both makes it more comfortable to have the camera at the ready as well as being a nice safety feature to prevent it from hitting the ground if ...


3

If I were in your situation, I would SELL the Canon Rebel XT body, rather than buy an inexpensive lens for it in your budget. With your original budget and the money from selling that body, buy yourself a brand new all-in-one zoom camera. I recently added a Canon SX50 to my mix of gear, and it's a nice camera for this kind of situation (and costs about $400 ...


3

There aren't many options within your budget, but there are several APC-C only wide angle zooms just above it at around $350-500. These would include the Tamron AF 17-50mm f/2.8 Di II ($500 on amazon, $350-400 on eBay), the Tokina AT-X 12-24mm f/4 AF ($400 amazon), and the Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM ($430 amazon). All of these should give better image ...


3

From what I can see the charger has the two pin plug, so that is compatible with the europlug used in most european countries, including all the ones you listed. You might stumble on an older socket installation for example in Italy, but they have the same current so you only need a converter for those. Modern sockets are compatible with both older and ...


3

Billing for travel should include 3 parts: Work, Travel, and Per Diem Work Billing for the work is often the most difficult. The easiest way to quote a fair price would be billing hours worked at your standard rate, or your average income in a single day, whichever is greater. For example, if you work 8 hours, but in a normal day at the office you'd work ...


2

I do most of my picture taking outdoors while hiking. In my experience, the best answer is a decent day pack, having nothing specific to do with photography. When you're going for short distances and times, this stuff doesn't matter much anyway. When you're out there longer, then you always need other stuff along with the photo gear. The hiking community ...


2

I've put mine back together a few times after one of the dividers keeping it from falling apart failed, so in theory you could do it. But it's not worth the trouble, and leaves the monopod weak and prone to falling apart on you again when you don't want it to. It also increases the total volume you'll be taking with you, for very little reduction in the ...


2

There are two that I use semi-regularly: Camera+ offers some pretty noticeable improvements in features over the main camera app. Some good ones include separated focus and exposure, digital zoom, levels, and more. For $1.99, it's pretty good. 645 PRO MkII has nice features, tries to handle like a dSLR and emulates a number of films out there. Don't ...


2

The Lens What kind of lens you need largely depends on what size critters you plan on photographing. For butterflies, most larger moths, large dragonflies, praying mantises, grasshoppers, scorpions etc., a 1:1 macro lens is a bit of overkill (though it doesn't hurt to have one). You simply can't get the full body of the insect in the frame at 1:1 ...


2

The Canon EF-S 10-22 is a great lens. But even used may be close to $500. But if you can stretch your budget it is a great choice. I bought this when it first came out. For ultra wide shots I used to use a Sigma 15mm and correcting distortion. The 10-22 does have some distortion but it is minimal, and in general I use them as is out of the camera unless I ...


2

You don't really need to cover all possible focal lengths... And as for myself I find the standard lengths (around 35mm in APSC) quite boring, I'd go just for a wide angle and a telephoto lens: Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 and Tokina 50-135mm f2.8 About the wide angle, have you considered the Sigma 10-20mm f4-5.6? For landscapes you don't really need constant f2.8 ...


2

Assuming you want the face to be visible, try some of this: Use spot metering, point it to the person's face. You could try to underexpose slightly to give a bit of headroom in post. Change your or the subjects position to try shooting towards/against the sun (rather than having it come from behind you) The sun could be hidden just behind the person, or ...


2

I live in NZ. Note MPR's advice and carefully consider whether this trip is liable to be "the exception that proves the rule" -there are enough scenes in NZ where the photos of a lifetime cry out for the long lens. As Olin says - NZ is relatively small, but what this means in reality is that frequently have a vast range of 'photo opportunities' presented ...


2

The short answer would be to bring your 17-70 and make due. A better answer: when you travel the best thing to do is to compose a shot list in your mind or on paper. By pre-thinking of the "must have" shots, you can better plan for your camera bag. You have to consider weight if you're going to be hiking. I do a lot of travel photography. And, I ...


2

I travelled around London on a daily basis with my Nikon D100 and a pair of lenses by bike for several years and experienced no bad effects. A suitable bag and securing it safely to the bike or on your back should be sufficient. I've also carried several laptops like this and they're much more vulnerable. Note that I wasn't riding a hardtail chop though... ...


1

The Sigma and Samyang are your best bet. New Zealand is a beautiful country with a vast array of landscapes. Plus the 70mm end of your sigma will be more than enough for the various giant Snowmen, Carrots, Wellington Boots and L&P bottles they have (if you're in to photographing that sort of thing). If you are planning on going to a sporting event, ...


1

"Versatility" is one of those terms that means different things to different photographers. Most people take photos to record important people, places, and events. Family, vacations, homes and pets – I wish I had more of these photos myself. Versatility in this case usually means "more zoom" (this is the number one thing people with 18-55mm kit lenses ask ...


1

The most versatile Sony E mount lens that is both light and compact, other than for low light use, is either one of the two kit lenses sold with various NEX models: The E 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6 OSS PZ or the E 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6. The 16-50 is very lightweight and compact when stored, so ideally fits your use case as a light travel camera. It may not meet your ...


1

I would recommend taking multiple exposures and combining them using Exposure Fusion. I would not recommend combining multiple photos to HDR as you are likely to get a very unrealistic effect, but Exposure Fusion on the other hand could give you a pleasant image. Here is a post that explains how Exposure Fusion works: How does exposure fusion work?


1

With your criteria I think this one fits your bill, if you can stretch the $1500 to $1800: Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 21mm f/2.8 ZE Lens for Canon EF Mount EOS DSLR Cameras You wont look more professional with anything else than this. it is a pretty wide prime, and maximum aperture F2.8 is common for fast wide angle lenses (seem the physical constraints makes ...


1

If you want to go with a Canon lens, the EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM is within a couple hundred of your price point. The EF 35mm f/1.4L USM is actually within your price point and is very well reviewed, but is getting a little bit closer to standard than wide angle, particularly when on your 7D due to the crop sensor. On the slower and zoom side, there is the EF ...



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