Serene Life

by garik

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27

Scandinavia is pretty much the safest part of Europe. You have absolutely nothing to worry about, and there is no reason to behave any different than in your home country in regard to safety. That being said, things tend to break or get lost at the worst time. Backing up your photos is definitely a good idea, as is getting a good bag and straps. And do not ...


26

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


18

Having lived in Europe all my life, most of it with a camera around my neck (at least during my free time), I wonder where you got the idea that it's inherently unsafe to be in Europe while having a camera with you. The only time I've ever had gear stolen in 30 years+ was during a burglary at the house I was staying... Of course every country and city has ...


14

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


8

My direct experience with travel matches advice I was given years ago: expect to take the same kinds of photos, with the same type of equipment, as at home. If you have a particular lens that is rarely needed then there's no reason to expect that this will finally be the time to use it. The same goes for tripods, field notebooks, or any other new habit that ...


6

Yes, this charger will work. You can see from the specifications in the picture that it will accept a range of voltage from 100 to 240V. That includes Japan on the lowest side, and the US / North America at 110, and Europe at 230V. You will just need a physical plug adapter, which you can get pretty much anywhere. The countries you are visiting all have ...


6

Here are some options, I've personally had both huge successes and miserable failures with all of those techniques so you have to choose the one that fits the situation best: Find shade - A tree or a building that is just out of frame can do a very good job at preventing harsh sunlight (but you have to be careful not to blow up the background). Use some ...


6

In Europe the voltage is 230v, so if your adapter operates outside the 220-240v range you have to buy some kind of adapter doing the conversion. Also, Italy, France, Switzerland and Austria all have different power outlet shapes, but there is a common plug called "Europlug" which works on all four countries ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europlug ). Get an ...


5

This is based on my preference and my shooting style My guess is that the 18-55 mm IS II will suffice for most of the shot you are going to take. Since it is day time and it is a lens that will have all of the focal length I would use for the listed type of shots: 1 - 3 persons: I prefer to use a focal length of about 85 mm which is about the 55 end ...


5

A reflector is not necessarily an item specifically made for the purpose, but can be any surface that reflects light. Place your subjects right next to a light-colored or white surface that is lit by the sunlight. This will act as your reflector. Direct your subjects to look away from the sun, so that the light on their faces is the reflected light from ...


4

As others pointed out, losing your camera is always a risk, and with it, you might lose your pictures. A couple of really easy tips: Take a picture of your name and address. Anyone who finds your camera might turn it on, see the picture, and return the camera. You might even add "$50 reward to the person who returns this camera to me" (or whatever it is ...


3

Billing for travel should include 3 parts: Work, Travel, and Per Diem Work Billing for the work is often the most difficult. The easiest way to quote a fair price would be billing hours worked at your standard rate, or your average income in a single day, whichever is greater. For example, if you work 8 hours, but in a normal day at the office you'd work ...


3

From what I can see the charger has the two pin plug, so that is compatible with the europlug used in most european countries, including all the ones you listed. You might stumble on an older socket installation for example in Italy, but they have the same current so you only need a converter for those. Modern sockets are compatible with both older and ...


3

Move the girl in front of the post to get her out of the middle. Have her turn her body a little to make is more slimming. Balance the light on her face...probably have to do in post processing. Otherwise, is is a nice travel picture. Pretty girl + pretty place = good memory :)


2

I live in NZ. Note MPR's advice and carefully consider whether this trip is liable to be "the exception that proves the rule" -there are enough scenes in NZ where the photos of a lifetime cry out for the long lens. As Olin says - NZ is relatively small, but what this means in reality is that frequently have a vast range of 'photo opportunities' presented ...


2

The short answer would be to bring your 17-70 and make due. A better answer: when you travel the best thing to do is to compose a shot list in your mind or on paper. By pre-thinking of the "must have" shots, you can better plan for your camera bag. You have to consider weight if you're going to be hiking. I do a lot of travel photography. And, I ...


2

I travelled around London on a daily basis with my Nikon D100 and a pair of lenses by bike for several years and experienced no bad effects. A suitable bag and securing it safely to the bike or on your back should be sufficient. I've also carried several laptops like this and they're much more vulnerable. Note that I wasn't riding a hardtail chop though... ...


2

Assuming you want the face to be visible, try some of this: Use spot metering, point it to the person's face. You could try to underexpose slightly to give a bit of headroom in post. Change your or the subjects position to try shooting towards/against the sun (rather than having it come from behind you) The sun could be hidden just behind the person, or ...


2

Your primary lens should be the 18-55mm. Helicopters have very few air restrictions and therefore will be getting close to the landscape. The wide angle will also reduce blur from vibration and movement. A circular polarizer will only be needed if sunny. Skip it on a cloudy day to keep your shutter speed high. Only exception is if your shots are getting ...


2

I'm a photographer so I hope my feedback will help. First thing to consider is the back drop and where the person will be placed. Once you have that worked out it's time to make sure the lighting is beautiful. Without going into to much detail, off camera flash would be something to consider. The hat is responsible for casting some of the shadow on the ...


2

The answers above really do sum up the technical issues, although with travel images I would keep the background in focus and simply light the person better than the landscape to make sure that is the highest contrast area in your image. That allows them to become the main focus of this image instead of the beautiful landscape behind her. Fill flash is ...


2

You may consider Canon's new EF-S 10-18mm, released just a few months ago. It's really lightweight, has image stabilization (probably only one with IS from your choice. Optics are really surprisingly good, has less chromatic aberration than 10-22mm. Build quality is not near L lens (or 10-22mm), but is really ok and seems durable. For it's price (300$) is ...


1

I echo @jwenting's comments. I live in the UK, and have travelled all over with my DSLR kit taking photos everywhere from Barcelona in Spain up through France, Germany, all the way to Oslo in Norway. I've also travelled extensively with it throughout the USA. In general, you have nothing to worry about in Europe. Of course - be street-smart. Be aware of ...


1

I traveled through England and France a few years back and brought my Canon Rebel all over the place with me. I was so happy to bring my camera everywhere and it made for some amazing pictures. That said, know that most of Europe is very safe for violent crime, but it does have a lot of petty theft. You'll find pickpockets and purse snatchers in the ...


1

Finally got my hands on a D7100 and tried out the option to copy images from one memory card to another. The camera will let you select a folder to copy or individual images. You then select a location to copy to. Here you can select a folder on the other memory card. I took a minute or two to copy 350 raw files using 90MB/s SD cards. If you then ...


1

Travel time is billable at the normal rates. Always think that you could have billed your normal rate to another customer. All good business runs this way. Bill what someone will pay you to do your job because if you weren't doing travel you would be shooting.


1

Lots of motorcycle miles on my Nikon D90 with no ill effects at all. I have camera and one additional lens in a backpack designed for a camera system which has excellent padding. I put that in the top case behind the seat or in one of the side cases (panniers). I wouldn't be too concerned depending upon terrain of course. If you're off-roading, or riding ...


1

Watch the shutter speed: your focal length x 1.6 (crop factor) x 2 (or even 3) - added for the helicopter. For example for 250 mm you need: 250 x 1.6 x 2 = 800 - that is 1/800 shutter speed Most probably you'll have sun. Hence a good Circular Polarizer will help you. I'd recommend Marumi as a best price/performance ratio. I have them and I'm very pleased. ...


1

My advice: aim for short shutter speed. (considering the vibrations of the helicopter and possible high focal length)


1

This issue is true for all businesses. the question: Do I bill an hourly rate plus expenses and "diets by government rates". Versus what is the service worth to them. And is the travel time worth as much as active time? will the bill be too high vs the value of the service? Can you pool other work time with the travel time? Knowing a set amount of hours ...



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