Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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27

Scandinavia is pretty much the safest part of Europe. You have absolutely nothing to worry about, and there is no reason to behave any different than in your home country in regard to safety. That being said, things tend to break or get lost at the worst time. Backing up your photos is definitely a good idea, as is getting a good bag and straps. And do not ...


26

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


18

Having lived in Europe all my life, most of it with a camera around my neck (at least during my free time), I wonder where you got the idea that it's inherently unsafe to be in Europe while having a camera with you. The only time I've ever had gear stolen in 30 years+ was during a burglary at the house I was staying... Of course every country and city has ...


14

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


6

I only have a fairly small aluminum tripod (53 cm / 21" folded, sans head), which fits inside my suitcase and is more than sturdy enough to take any abuse the luggage handlers might dish out, so I've never had any trouble with it. I assume yours is both bigger and more expensive, though, which could make things more problematic. That said, I've had similar ...


4

As others pointed out, losing your camera is always a risk, and with it, you might lose your pictures. A couple of really easy tips: Take a picture of your name and address. Anyone who finds your camera might turn it on, see the picture, and return the camera. You might even add "$50 reward to the person who returns this camera to me" (or whatever it is ...


3

Move the girl in front of the post to get her out of the middle. Have her turn her body a little to make is more slimming. Balance the light on her face...probably have to do in post processing. Otherwise, is is a nice travel picture. Pretty girl + pretty place = good memory :)


3

Billing for travel should include 3 parts: Work, Travel, and Per Diem Work Billing for the work is often the most difficult. The easiest way to quote a fair price would be billing hours worked at your standard rate, or your average income in a single day, whichever is greater. For example, if you work 8 hours, but in a normal day at the office you'd work ...


2

Ideally, the answer is have the film get hand inspected each time. Always. X-rays are just like any other type of light for film - it exposes the film (and it gets through the film canister). You will occasionally see statements like "security check point that said film under ISO 800 would be unharmed going through the checked luggage x-ray machine" which ...


2

Your primary lens should be the 18-55mm. Helicopters have very few air restrictions and therefore will be getting close to the landscape. The wide angle will also reduce blur from vibration and movement. A circular polarizer will only be needed if sunny. Skip it on a cloudy day to keep your shutter speed high. Only exception is if your shots are getting ...


2

The answers above really do sum up the technical issues, although with travel images I would keep the background in focus and simply light the person better than the landscape to make sure that is the highest contrast area in your image. That allows them to become the main focus of this image instead of the beautiful landscape behind her. Fill flash is ...


2

I'm a photographer so I hope my feedback will help. First thing to consider is the back drop and where the person will be placed. Once you have that worked out it's time to make sure the lighting is beautiful. Without going into to much detail, off camera flash would be something to consider. The hat is responsible for casting some of the shadow on the ...


2

I travelled around London on a daily basis with my Nikon D100 and a pair of lenses by bike for several years and experienced no bad effects. A suitable bag and securing it safely to the bike or on your back should be sufficient. I've also carried several laptops like this and they're much more vulnerable. Note that I wasn't riding a hardtail chop though... ...


2

You may consider Canon's new EF-S 10-18mm, released just a few months ago. It's really lightweight, has image stabilization (probably only one with IS from your choice. Optics are really surprisingly good, has less chromatic aberration than 10-22mm. Build quality is not near L lens (or 10-22mm), but is really ok and seems durable. For it's price (300$) is ...


1

I marked this to be closed as its primarily opinion based. Personally, I would much prefer to have a 10-24 and 70-300 over the 18-200. For me, for such an awesome trip, 18 wouldn't be wide enough to make me happy and 200 wouldn't be long enough. (300 wouldn't be long enough, either, but thinking about staying light...) It's a personal choice. Your ...


1

Rather than supply links, which may or may not stay around for some time, I would suggest considering that many photographers use studio lighting in remote settings without a readily available electrical outlets. While some are really big budget and may bring generators, many just use battery packs for their lights. So, some lighting makers, such as Paul C. ...


1

My first thought for about $1000 is to get the 24-105L and leave the kit lens at home. Once you shift from that kit lens to a higher quality lens you'll wonder why you waited. If you really want to keep the kit lens in your kit, then the Sigma 10-20 is a good idea. I haven't used the Canon 10-22 but have heard good things about it. Don't forget that if ...


1

When picking a lens, you need to consider what it is you want to shoot with that lens. For street/travel, most folks would probably opt for an ultrawide zoom (if they're interested in cityscapes/landscapes or shooting in smaller spaces), a superzoom (for versatility), and/or a few wide-to-normal fast primes (street, night, and across-the-table shooting). ...


1

Generally, if you do not already know what to buy - then you should not buy anything. I'd suggest to look thoroughly into learning more about photography in general instead. As you're "on" with that you will - with time - find out exactly what you're lacking/missing... and by that learn what to look for in an eventual new camera - if you get to that ...


1

sweden, not problem at all, having been in sweden and norway quite a bit, i have never had a problem. Like in the US you leave things laying around it is gone,as mentioned by others. a portable drive for all your photo would be good idea. You will find northern parts of sweden/norway great for photography. Enjoy your stay.


1

I would say the same as other posters, but I would elaborate on the part where you want to make sure your equipment is in sight. General safety is not an issue, I haven't heard anyone shot for a DSLR but you don't want to be flaunting it needlessly - not even in the US! The region is beautiful and make sure you capture the lovely time with great snaps. ...


1

I echo @jwenting's comments. I live in the UK, and have travelled all over with my DSLR kit taking photos everywhere from Barcelona in Spain up through France, Germany, all the way to Oslo in Norway. I've also travelled extensively with it throughout the USA. In general, you have nothing to worry about in Europe. Of course - be street-smart. Be aware of ...


1

I traveled through England and France a few years back and brought my Canon Rebel all over the place with me. I was so happy to bring my camera everywhere and it made for some amazing pictures. That said, know that most of Europe is very safe for violent crime, but it does have a lot of petty theft. You'll find pickpockets and purse snatchers in the ...


1

Finally got my hands on a D7100 and tried out the option to copy images from one memory card to another. The camera will let you select a folder to copy or individual images. You then select a location to copy to. Here you can select a folder on the other memory card. I took a minute or two to copy 350 raw files using 90MB/s SD cards. If you then ...


1

Watch the shutter speed: your focal length x 1.6 (crop factor) x 2 (or even 3) - added for the helicopter. For example for 250 mm you need: 250 x 1.6 x 2 = 800 - that is 1/800 shutter speed Most probably you'll have sun. Hence a good Circular Polarizer will help you. I'd recommend Marumi as a best price/performance ratio. I have them and I'm very pleased. ...


1

My advice: aim for short shutter speed. (considering the vibrations of the helicopter and possible high focal length)


1

This issue is true for all businesses. the question: Do I bill an hourly rate plus expenses and "diets by government rates". Versus what is the service worth to them. And is the travel time worth as much as active time? will the bill be too high vs the value of the service? Can you pool other work time with the travel time? Knowing a set amount of hours ...


1

Travel time is billable at the normal rates. Always think that you could have billed your normal rate to another customer. All good business runs this way. Bill what someone will pay you to do your job because if you weren't doing travel you would be shooting.


1

Lots of motorcycle miles on my Nikon D90 with no ill effects at all. I have camera and one additional lens in a backpack designed for a camera system which has excellent padding. I put that in the top case behind the seat or in one of the side cases (panniers). I wouldn't be too concerned depending upon terrain of course. If you're off-roading, or riding ...


1

I recall that the x-ray machines for carry-ons were marked "Film Safe". This page seems to confirm that, though the person still recommends hand checking.



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