Evening

by w.hrybok

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36

The Gorillapod range are quite portable tripods, with the added benefit of 'attach anywhere' - at least places you won't get a conventional tripod!


28

You can use a monopod as a lighter, but still sturdy alternative. Small legs for the point at the bottom can serve to help steady you, although it's no replacement for a proper tripod. GorillaPods are an option, as mentioned by others. I actually like to use a beanbag when I'm tight for space; it turns almost any surface into a usable camera mount.


28

Interestingly I have a different perspective than @ShutterBug. I live in a safe country but travel often to ones that are not. The main difference is that I do not blend in with locals. That means no amount of being inconspicuous, hiding company logos, etc will put me out of sight. Everyone nearly instantly knows that I am there. I've been followed and ...


27

Depends on how much you value your shots. Last year my wife and I took a 5 month photographic trip and we took: 1 Laptop: We had Lightroom to download and do a basic selection every night (out of focus pictures don't need to take any disk space!). Photoshop to do some basic retouches if we wanted to publish them on Flickr, etc. And a large enough HD to ...


27

Scandinavia is pretty much the safest part of Europe. You have absolutely nothing to worry about, and there is no reason to behave any different than in your home country in regard to safety. That being said, things tend to break or get lost at the worst time. Backing up your photos is definitely a good idea, as is getting a good bag and straps. And do not ...


26

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


25

I live in a country where crime-rate is quite high but that doesn't prevent the photographers here from buying/using expensive gears. All you have to do is be a little more careful than usual. I'd suggest: Avoid lone journeys. If possible gather a group of people. Use public transports as much as possible avoiding taxis. Try to avoid late night and too ...


22

Forget holding the camera at an arms length if you also want the picture to be good. Everything will be distorted, and you will have a silly look in your face, probably also with strange lighting. If what you are aiming for is a picture of you in front of the famous landmarks, then I would simply ask a stranger. Try to look for one carrying a camera, as ...


21

I think you're going about this the wrong way. If you have 2GB of images at 4-5MB each, that's somewhere between 400 and 500 images. That's way too many. Even your close friends probably don't want to wade through all of that. Instead, go through and pick out the very best 10%. Or 5% or even 1%. Take some care and write a meaningful caption for each one. An ...


20

The thing about travel is, you are someplace unique. The thing to do is figure out just what is unique about where you are, and try to capture some aspect of it that means something to you. For instance, in Amsterdam I saw bikes everywhere so I tried to get interesting shots involving bikes: ...


20

I literally just got back (a few days ago) from spending a few weeks in Europe with my 7D, 10-22mm, 17-55mm, 50mm and 55-250mm. I too have little interest in portraits, and took a lot of landscapes, architecture and "detail" shots on my trip. And I left my tripod at home... so perhaps some of my experiences/thoughts will be useful... I carried the 3 zooms ...


20

I realize this probably isn't Exactly what you're looking for (because it is a bit of cold water in the face, potentially), but hopefully you'll find it helpful anyway... There are three main reasons that photographers get their work published: They differentiate. What makes your photographs different than every other photographer's photographs? If you ...


18

China is huge. China is so huge that two cities can seem to be two different countries. This means Chinese do travel to other cities as "tourists" too. I am from Hong Kong, so I am a Chinese too. So being in China I think I can offer some good insight. Fact is, Chinese who travel to other cities as tourists are often the more wealthy ones, and enjoy a so ...


18

Having lived in Europe all my life, most of it with a camera around my neck (at least during my free time), I wonder where you got the idea that it's inherently unsafe to be in Europe while having a camera with you. The only time I've ever had gear stolen in 30 years+ was during a burglary at the house I was staying... Of course every country and city has ...


17

Several people have mentioned beanbags and such which are nice, if you want to spend a few bucks on a dedicated solution based on the beanbag concept then check out The Pod series of "beanbags with camera mounts". I have been using one for a few years and they are great and don't take up much room.


17

You can fake the tripod with few metres of string. Instructions here.


17

I've done a lot of travel with dSLR equipment and cards, I've never had an issue, it's safe to send through. The issue, historically, was with film since x-rays are light and could affect the film.


17

I know this isn't a relationship advice site, but that's the route I'm going to take anyway. In my experience, family trips and serious photography do not mix — and I think it's at least double-true for honeymoons. This isn't an anti-spouse or anti-family concept; in fact, it's probably even stronger if you're both into photography. While some rare ...


16

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


16

In addition to @Itai's answer, I'd like to add, if you don't want to spend 1200$ on a tripod just to protect it from sands, you can use a little care, or on extreme situations, alternative DIY methods. I also wrecked a tripod (not totally wrecked, but the sands kind of jammed the levers on the legs) by using it near a beach on a windy day. The next time I ...


14

Quality and weight are often opposed when it comes to lenses, so since you emphasized quality, I'll ignore the weight issue. Also note that focal-lengths are highly personal and depend on how you see the world. Where one photographer uses a wide-angle, another may use a telephoto. For the subject matter you requested, at least a moderate wide-angle lens is ...


14

One way is to just set reasonably wide focal length, something around f/5.6, put the camera on nearest rock/bench/nice spot on the ground, and take a picture with a self-timer. It works even for groups:


13

An alternative tripod that may serve your needs is the TrekPod. It might be the closest thing you are going to get from a weight perspective, but it has an interesting capability that may make its weight a moot point. The TrekPod XL weighs 630g (including the ball head), and is a cross between a tripod and a monopod. It can get up to 62" in height, but ...


13

There are lightweight tripods. I recently purchased a Gitzo Mountaineer GT0541 tripod. Its fairly expensive at $500, but it only weighs 1.7lbs, or 780g. I know its not quite 500g, but still very light weight as far as tripods go...one of the lightest weight tripods I could find. I think Gitzo only makes one tripod that is just a tad lighter at 720g, but it ...


13

Burning DVD is your best option and even if you use another means, you should still burn DVDs. The main advantages are: Burned DVDs have no value, they won't gets stollen by themselves. It is easy to replicate and distribute. Meaning you don't have to keep all copies in the same place. When I travel for photography I always burn everything twice. One ...


13

some things I use: Gaffers tape - if my bags, cameras, and my camera gear looks like it is being held together by gaffers tape people are less likely to steal it (doesn't mean they won't, just less likely). Nothing looks bright, shiny or new. The equipment bags i carry in high crime areas look like something a homeless person would stuff their belongings ...


13

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


12

Perhaps not applicable in all scenarios, but taking sequences of photos as the maximum speed possible in your camera (say around 5 or so frames) can act as a "stabilizer". Out of such a series, one frame tends to be pretty sharp, even at rather slow shutter speeds.


12

A diaper bag with a foam insert (like the Domke inserts. It's not pretty, but that's the point: it looks exactly like something you don't want to stick your hand into.


12

The problem with your prerequisites is that you've painted yourself into a corner. First you asked for a single lens suitable for landscape (generally wide) and wildlife (long or very long). This restricts you to the few super-zooms around. Then you've asked for that same lens to be good for fast actions and low light, both of which require bright lenses. ...



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