Serene Life

by garik

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19

Don't get tied down to thinking you only need one camera. Each camera has its own unique benefits and drawbacks. I highly recommend: A small point and shoot camera for those always ready snapshots you want to take An SLR camera for when you need more quality and control. You can capture motion very well with these things, and the control you have over ...


11

The safest position for your SLR is in your bank's safety deposit box. Once you decide you want to take pictures, you must accept some non-zero risk of damage to your camera. Camera in bag with lens facing up: - Harder/slower to remove camera from bag. - If bag hits ground, you must ship the body off to repair the screen Camera in bag with lens facing ...


10

You can check BlackRapid R-Strap. As @jrista mentioned in his comment, you can Do It Yourself if you want.


7

The more accessories you take with you the less likely you are to take pictures. You best option is to keep the camera out and ready to use. Cameras, especially Nikons are much more durable than many people are inclined to realize. Also, if you have it over your shoulder you will probably take fewer pictures. Try carrying it in your hand when you wander ...


7

I use the Think Tank Airport Antidote which not only holds my camera, 6 lenses, flash, teleconverters, and other camera gear, it also holds my laptop and ebook reader. More importantly, it fits inside the carry-on requirements and will slide under the seat of a regional commuter jet.


6

Having the camera accessible is critically important to get a variety of shots along the way. Huge backpacks are not ideal for this. I used a Top-Loading zoom bag when I carried fewer lenses ;) This bag is quite cheap and will serve you in the future too, it comes in different sizes and colors. The tripod should easily be able to be attached to your ...


6

I don't think it particularly matters. I have multiple different cases from Canon and the default configurations of the cases put the camera in different orientations in each. My shoulder bag puts the camera level with the ground with a small lens attached, just like it would be if I was about to shoot with it. MY backpack offers two different options, ...


5

Answering my own question. I did some research and found a few other bags that match my criteria. I don't own them nor I have even seen them in person--just some ideas for other people who are looking for something similar. Lowepro Fastpack 350 Lowepro Primus AW Kata 3N1-30


5

I wanted to take my efforts up a gear and get a 'proper' camera The first question to ask is: "Why isn't your compact a 'proper' camera?". Or, more generally, "what do you want to do that your current camera cannot?" Your answer to this question very well might convince you to give up the DSLR & go back to your compact (or perhaps a newer ...


5

What about buying a decent sized tank bag and padding that out a bit? If you use a magnetic tank bag you might have to be mindful of where they are in relation to the camera gear although they don't usually seem to be under the bag itself, rather on flaps to the sides. You could keep the camera sat in there with quite a long lens on it (most tank bags are ...


5

Check out the Cotton Carrier vest, which holds the camera vertically tight against your chest. I haven't used it myself, but do know others who are happy with it.


5

Use padding Any camera bag will have enough padding to prevent the kind of damage that comes from jostling and bumping equipment together. I sometimes wrap a DSLR in a large microfibre cloth or a jumper within an ordinary backpack. Reduce Movement Ensure the camera can not move within it's padding, adjust a camera bag's internal dividers to make a snug ...


4

If you are certain you want an SLR but feel that regular ones are too bulky, consider a micro4/3 camera such as the E-P1, perhaps coupled with a fast 20mm pancake lens. It'll be smaller, but still retain most advantages (most importantly the higher image quality) that SLRs enjoy over compacts.


4

Lowepro Fastpack 250 - Has a padded section for your camera gear, a padded section for your laptop, and a space at the top (easily accesible) for stuff like a book, passport, ipod, etc. Has worked great for me, doesn't break the bank either.


4

I use the Lowepro Fastpack 350, and I think that it will suit your needs fine. The lower area contains compartments for camera and lenses, and the upper area is just a single compartment for "other items". There is also a separate compartment for a 17" laptop, and the size of the backpack fits within the regulations for airplane carry on luggage. I've ...


4

Fact: The camera is safer in the bag than when it is not. Therefore: I would claim that the safest position to have the camera in the bag is a position that makes it easy to access the camera, as otherwise you are less likely to put the camera back in the bag.


3

This is the reason why I bought a tripod that could be collapsed to less than 20 inches: so it will fit in my rollaboard suitcase. I simply toss my tripod and head in the suitcase, body and lens in my briefcase. When I want to go shoot, my tripod is light enough to carry by hand, or I can actually clip a shoulder strap on it if I need to. (comes in handy ...


3

For my backpacking trip, I just carried my DSLR with two lens in the daypack that was attached to the main backpack. It is very convenient when you can just throw your backpack in some hostel's luggage room and just detach the daypack and go do touristy things.. Of course, it did not have any support for the camera, so I padded the day pack with towel. ...


2

You could try... buying the cheapest 72+mm filter you can find (whether it be on eBay or a retail shop or some kind of photography market/swap-meet) if you've got friends into photography, they may have an old filter they don't use, or a spare case from a filter that's broken/lost/permanently-affixed (have you asked around for old/spare cases?) just get ...


2

For a DIY answer, if you can get your hands on an old metal cigarette case, they should be large enough, and some thin packing foam, you could roll your own (no pun intended). The cigarette case can be found at a myriad of antique shops around, I've seen them plenty of times in such environments, both in the States and Canada, and they're usually only a few ...


2

I have a Kata R-103. It takes my camera and plenty of lenses or other equipment, a 15" laptop and a tripod. If you need space for a bigger laptop, check out the bigger models in the Kata R series. You can easily change the compartments in the inside of the backpack. It is no problem to fit an apple and a book in there. The backpack has an extremely good ...


2

You could try one of the Crumpler Jimmy Bo's, they come in various sizes. Or even the 4 million dollar home.


2

Here's what I am doing: Travelling light I bring as little as possible: One camera (Nikon D5100), one lens (18-105mm or 35mm/1.8), spare battery, spare memory card, a polarizing filter and a small flash (SB-400). The total weight is 1.2 kg (2.6 pounds), which is heavier than a compact, but still light enough that I can carry it all day without noticing ...


2

http://fstopgear.com/ F stop gear makes ridiculous bags. They are normal backpacking bags with camera units that are expandable. I'd say they were your best bet.


2

Check out the Lowepro bags. I've been using one for my gear, and they are great. They should have one to meet your needs!


2

I asked similar question not long ago, and together with David Lambert we exchange our views. You can find this discussion here.


2

Well specifically answering the question about how to carry, you can get a backpack that has the capability of carrying a tripod such as this bag on Amazon. Or if you don't want to carry around a backpack, then I would suggest having a secondary tripod that is smaller then full size, portable, and can fit into a handback or similar camera bag. Obviously ...


2

Tamrac 3385 Aero Speed Pack 85 tries to answer these needs. There is a separate top compartment with enough space for some small items (like a guidebook, tiny umbrella, gorillapod and/or lunch). It isn't too large or convenient; depends on your jacket whether it fits in. Anyway, I very much like the idea of keeping my lunch and my camera gear in separate ...


2

This is an easy one! Once I figured this out I've never carried an SLR around my neck since. Simply put, wear the strap around your shoulder, but put your arm through the other way, so that with the lens hanging down the pentaprism is against your body. I tend to tuck the lens behind my waist, and hold the camera against my body with my arm/elbow, which ...


2

I like straps that plug into the tripod mount, so I tried the Black Rapid strap and it worked okay. The whole strap felt a little cheap, but the sliding connecter worked well, although it did have a tendency to bounce around a bit unless I deliberately locked it back into place. I tried the Cinch which worked very well. No sliding connection (two mount ...



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