Serene Life

by garik

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14

A digital sensor is a linear device — it counts photons, and gives a value which corresponds directly to the amount of light. Human vision, however, doesn't work that way. Our perception of light follows a power curve. So, images made with "flat", unadjusted sensor output look dull and lifeless. Cameras convert this raw sensor data into made-for-use JPEG ...


13

Expanding on Miguel's answer with an illustration, I have in the center a test image gradient with no curve adjustment. On the left I am using a steep curve that pushes my shades of grey closer to extreme black or white, spreading out values near middle grey over a larger range of shades. The effect is that the extreme dark and light areas encroach more on ...


11

I like to think about the tone curve in terms of a function: y = t(x) The input value x to the function is a pixel value from the source image, which is actually the brightness of that pixel. Let's say the values of x can range from 0.0 (black) to 1.0 (white), with all the gray tones represented as real numbers between 0 and 1 (to simplify things a bit ...


10

Highlight tone priority is a camera mode that internally fiddles with exposure to preserve as much detail as possible in the "highlight range" of tones...the brightest tones in a photograph. It does this, however, at the cost of tones in the shadow range, as the ultimate effect is a shift of the histogram down towards the shadows. The cost of shadow tones is ...


6

There is no equivalent. These scales are completely arbitrary and not measured in any unit! There are no step sizes and no real limits, for example: Some cameras let you go from -2 to +2, -5 to +5, 0 to 9 or even non-numeric scales like high to low. Note that these parameters are subject to interpretation. For example, there are dozens of ways to sharpen ...


5

Since Miguel provided an excellent mathematical answer, I'll try to provide a visual and practical analysis of the tone curve tool in Lightroom. To put it simply, it lets you adjust the luminance of the range of tones in a photograph. Lightroom enhances the basic tone curve with four adjustable tonal ranges that can be attenuated, giving you a bit more ...


4

Highlight priority underexposes by one stop by lowering the ISO, for this reason ISO100 cannot be selected with highlight priority. In post-process the camera compensates for the underexposure, except for the highlights As a RAW shooter you can archieve the same result by underexposing all your shots with 1 stop and then lift everything but the highlights. ...


4

This is one of the few image-enhancement settings that is extremely useful. It is in the custom menu because once you set it, you leave it and do not fiddle with it between shots. When enabled, your camera will preserve more details in the highlights at the expense of some details in the shadows. If your style is to expose for the highlights, then it will ...


3

A tone curve is a curve that describes how to turn a shadow, mid-tone or highlight into it's final value for the image you are after. It can add more contrast, reduce contrast or selectively boost shadows, midtones and highlights. These operations can also be done on a per-channel basis (such as red, green and blue) to adjust the colour of a pixel as well. ...


3

Excerpt from an official Canon Quick Guide: Highlight Tone Priority (HTP) All cameras have a fixed dynamic range, from shadow to highlight, that they can capture. HTP shifts some of the available dynamic range from the mid-tones to the highlights to produce smoother tones, with more detail in bright areas. This helps prevent JPEG images ...


3

If you want to evaluate color reproduction and accuracy, you need to use a color checker card. X-Rite is pretty much the source for such devices today, as they purchased Gretag Macbeth some time ago. I personally use the X-Rite ColorChecker Passport, which is a handy pocket-sized clamshell device with the standard colorchecker pattern, an enhanced color ...


3

There are some key differences between a picture style and a white balance setting. While both can affect white and color balance, simply because of the nature of color, the two are intended for different purposes. Picture Styles affect the baseline curves applied to the image when interpolating the raw bayer pixel information into RGB pixels for viewing ...


3

First a brief explanation... A picture style/profile is simply a recipe; it is a means of interpreting the raw data of the sensor. It dictates the tone, contrast, sharpness, brightness, and other ways of interpreting the raw data. When shooting jpeg then these recipes are used in the conversion of the raw to jpeg in camera. So to answer your questions... ...


2

Since it will vary from camera to camera, the easiest way to find out what the equivalent is for a specific camera would be to test it yourself. Set the camera up as neutral as possible. In the case of your Canon 5D Mark II, that would be the 'Neutral' picture style. Then take a series of RAW+JPEG photos with the contrast set at -4 to +4 in one step ...


2

You're right. The picture style only affects JPEG development. The main exception is detailed here — cameras usually use these settings for review (which may affect the exposure decisions you make) and for metering (which may affect the exposure decisions the camera makes). Some RAW converters may use it to set defaults; others will ignore it. Many viewers ...


1

Picture Styles generally don't affect white balance per se, but they do affect colour balance. For example, portrait styles increase red channels to provide warmer skin tones, and landscape portrait styles boost the blue and green channels for more vivid scenery and skies.



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