Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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47

The approach you take will probably depend on whether you wish to photograph star trails, do short-exposure astrophotography, or long-exposure astrophotography. Star trails are relatively easy to capture, however short and long exposure astrophotography must be done with a little more care. These tips assume you are using a DSLR. Required Gear To take ...


23

I've never attempted to photograph the Aurora Borealis myself however the following advice applies to most celestial photography: You will want the fastest (biggest aperture) lens you can get your hands on. The 50 f/1.4 is ideal, though the focal length is quite long for this sort of thing. It's good because it will let in about 5-6 times as much light as ...


15

Be Ready! First thing first, when you can, always keep your eye trained on the subject through the lens. Birds are quick, alert, and attentive, and when they do something interesting thats worth capturing, you rarely have time to bring the camera to your eye, frame, focus, and get a shot. So its critical that you are watching the bird through the lens as ...


14

I did a wedding earlier this year, and having never done one before had the same fears as you. For me, the following points were very important: Talk to the bride & groom in advance. Discuss what they want from you out of the day. They are the MOST IMPORTANT thing for you to consider. They may ask for formal shots at the church, or informal shots at ...


13

You are right, a wedding is hard to do. But it is not impossible and we all have to start somewhere. One of the biggest challenges is going to be staying ahead of the program and getting in the right spot at the right time. Much of wedding photography is being prepared for the "next shot", getting yourself positioned and close enough to the action, and ...


12

The practical answer to your question is to find some female friend to photograph in that same location first, perhaps reading some tips online about photographing models. Then you can see what works with lights, what poses look good, and practice asking for poses. Also when you go out with the "real" model it would probably be good to take the same female ...


11

tripod. Use your lowest ISO (50 or 100). I always use a cable release to avoid vibration in the camera. You'll get circular trails if you point the camera at Polaris (the north star; assuming northern hemisphere here); pointing it at something interesting and just letting the trails happen is fine. exposure length is something to experiment with, start at ...


11

Most important tip: if your friends did ask you to take photos of their wedding and you are entirely new to this kind of photography: DO NOT DO IT. Really. Spare yourself and your friends (possibly they are not your friends anymore) the disappointment. Hire a professional (they are not this expensive) and take photos along with him (ask him beforehands, ...


9

First thing first: check the museum photography policy. It's usually available on the museum Website. Ususally, photography is permitted in the permanent collections but not in the temp exhibits. From the MET Website http://www.metmuseum.org/visit/tips/ Photography Still photography is permitted for private, noncommercial use only in the ...


9

Here are some easy tips from my experiences as a parade and convention photography and what I learned from a conference on war-time journalism. Get more batteries Get more memory cards, many medium sized ones are better than one large one Get a faster lens Get an outer garment that identifies you front and back as a photographer Take just the camera body, ...


8

I have found the Digital Photography School site fairly decent for some tutorials and tips, here is a basic set of tips for wedding photography ... http://www.digital-photography-school.com/wedding-photography-tips-to-get-you-started


8

I was at the Met last week actually. A few people suggested you bring a fast lens, and that's very true, especially since flash is not allowed (not that I have one on my camera anyway). So far the assumption is that you want to take picture of the art. I wasn't interested in that, there is just too much, and professionals are busy doing it much better than ...


8

Projector native resolution needs to be taken into account. This will often be no higher than about 1024 x 768 in cheaper or older projectors. If you drive it at higher resolutions or at different aspect ratios it may convert internally but you are at the mercy of its processes. A very major and often overlooked factor in using a projector is that what you ...


7

From my experience... Tripod of course is vital As is a shutter-release cable or, better still, some kind of automated/timed trigger (I have a battery grip with in-built time-lapse/long-exposure controls, you can also get external shutter releases that have the same timing features) If possible avoid near/sub-zero temps unless you have some high quality ...


7

The lack of focus could be partially the result of camera shake. Even though the focus is correct, the image may be blurred slightly by the movement, which would go away using a tripod. If you are looking at 100% crops of digital images, there will probably be some blur unless you make sure to select a high enough shutter speed. The same image viewed as a ...


7

One of the best things you could do is look at lots of fashion photos. Figure out what they're doing with framing and composition, what they're using to light the scene, be it flashes, soft boxes, natural light, look at how they've processed the image. The colours, the retouching etc. I know that this form of learning works for me. Inspired and learnt from ...


7

Right off the bat, you're going to want to have a fast lens, the faster the better. Light is going to be a major premium and having a fast lens will make a huge difference. Since wide open lenses can be soft, you can up your odds on a good outcome by going with a prime lens which is usually sharper than a zoom. Now, some of that depends on the camera you're ...


7

Avoid Glare Try to position yourself so that the lights aren't reflecting directly off the surface of the artwork and causing a hotspot in the image. A longer lens will make this easier than a wide angle lens. (This tip cribbed from Light: Science and Magic) (Good question, by the way :)


7

A lot of these suggestions are no different from general (and especially portrait) photography, but it's always worth repeating them: Don't forget to "fill the frame:" with the 400mm reach it's tempting to take pictures of birds that are far away, but to get detail you still need to get close. Focus on (and expose for) the eyes! If the wings are a little ...


6

It looks like you can put a focusing screen into a 450D. Check out these links for the procedure: Canon EOS 450D 500D 1000D Split Screen Installation Canon EOS 450D Focusing Screen Installation ** ** Beware, that page is written in fairly bad English. Canon 450D & 500D focusing screens for purchase. I have no idea if the price is reasonable...plain ...


6

Cleaning the glass is a great suggestion, however, even with clean glass you have a few more issues. Fast moving fish - Since fish often make quick movements, you will probably want a fairly fast shutter speed, which means you need fast lenses and plenty of light. Glare - This can be caused by your flash, or by other ambient lights. Ideally, there would be ...


6

Given the equipment you have listed, I would say an entire kit replacement might be in order. The Nikon D70s looks like a decent DSLR, however it does not have the greatest high-ISO performance. Higher ISO capability with low noise would be a huge boon for photographing concerts (which tend to be quite dark.) Something that can handle ISO 1600, possibly even ...


6

There is a semi-famous trick known as the black hat trick. What you do is set your camera to take a long exposure, and put a black hat over the camera while you are waiting for the fireworks to burst. Then right before the fireworks burst, take the hat off. It should greatly reduce the amount of smoke you see in your images, and not show the rocket blasting ...


6

Shoot the details. The entire story of the building cannot be told by a wide angle shot. You look at the whole building, and you tell a story which everyone else can understand if they stand in front of it. You see, a postcard does the same. If you have actually walked into a historical building, see every detail of it, you "experienced" the place and its ...


6

What, exactly, makes them complain about poor picture quality? If you're shooting an uncalibrated projector toward an arbitrary projection surface, you've got a lot of things working against you. First of all, your color configuration is liable to be all over the place. Secondly, you're going to be at the mercy and the reflectivity of your wall. I'd ...


6

Being there are the right time makes a huge difference. Depending on how you travel, this can be rather difficult. General tours and cruises particularly tend to go places at the worst time of the day. Some areas like parks and natural wonders have opening hours which are very restrictive as well. The main trick in those situations is not much of a trick ...


6

My solution is a photographic staple: tape. For camera batteries I put a strip of tape securely across the terminals, with one end folded under to create an easy-peel 'flag'. It needs to be removed before the battery can be used, making it foolproof. For AA and AAA batteries I do the same, but with tape across both ends. A little slower to remove, but they ...


5

You're not going to have much fun with those variable aperture lenses unless you're in really well lit venues. Wide apertures rule in gig photography. For smaller venues, a 50mm f/1.8 will get you started for about £100. Next step would be a 24-70mm f/2.8 to give you a bit more flexibility (doesn't have to be Nikon - Sigma do a screw focus one for about ...


5

I don't use a lensbaby and don't have any great resources for you, but seeing that the question has gone unanswered for so long, I'll post what I can... Craig of The Mindful Eye uses a Lensbaby. Back in the day he posted more how-to stuff about using it, but there are some of his photos along with nuggets of info in his blog: ...


5

Take a spare of everything. Keep checking your settings, it's really easy to walk inside briefly, change ISO then go and shoot the rest of your outdoor photos at ISO 6400! Likewise you could be grabbing a few candids during the formal portraits and end up shooting the second half of them at f/1.8 Likewise check the results your getting to make sure your ...



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