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by Aditya

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54

Basically you want to simulate the shallow depth of field you would get when photographing small objects. This can be done either with lens with tilt function (i.e. special purpose lens called either a tilt-shift or perspective control lens) or by selectively blurring an image in post. It's not hard to do, but there is something you need to ensure in the ...


20

The best way absolutely is to use a dedicated tilt-shift lens. They are quite pricey, and manual control only, but that is the best option, and you asked for the best. For some examples, see Canon's TS lineup and Nikon's Perspective Control lineup. Assuming you don't have $1000 to spend (Or more), then your next best option is to try for something like a ...


19

A tilt-shift lens is indeed the best way to correct this effect in-camera, but even then, it can look odd if the distortion is quite high. The example you have given should be OK. If you want to do it in post-processing, Lightroom 3 now has built-in perspective correction tools. When you use them, a grid overlays the photo which is updated live, so you can ...


15

You don't actually need a tilt-shift lens to do this. This particular image was taken with a standard lens (50mm f1.2 according to the filename of the image on Ryan's website) rather than with a tilt-shift. The extreme bokeh effect here was achieved by using a freelensing technique, where the lens is detached from the camera body and held at a tilted angle ...


14

You don't use the tilt element of tilt-shift lenses to fix perspective, only the shift element. Tilting tilts (or swings - that's the term for a horizontal tilt) the plane of focus. It's mostly used for increasing apparent depth of field. Imagine you're taking a picture of a football field. You want the entire field to be in focus but you're using a large ...


14

You don't actually need tilt for perspective correction, only shift is relevant here. There are some shift adapters offered to go between a DSLR body and a medium format lens, these would help out as well; note though, that medium format lenses come in relatively longer focal lengths - e.g. 45mm is already ultra-wide for medium format. An option for getting ...


14

The reason tilt-shift "sells" the miniature effect to the eye is that it allows both the foreground and background to be out of focus. We are accustomed to seeing images of city scenes, for example, where the foreground is a bit blurry, or the distant background is out of focus, but not both. Normal lenses shooting these scenes near infinity focus will ...


11

I also recommend the Lensbaby - but be aware that tilt shift is a much more challenging effect to achieve than you might think - even with a tilt shift lens I end up with 2-3x more throw awasy with tilt shift, but the keepers are worth it! There are also plenty of ways to DIY a tilt-shift lens Build a Tilt-Shift Camera Lens for Peanuts DIY Tilt-Shift ...


10

It is very simple: Metering does not work when the lens is shifted, metering does not work when the lens is tilted. The workaround is also very simple: Shoot in M mode. Adjust the exposure to your satisfaction with the lens untilted and unshifted. Then shift and/or tilt, and take the actual photo. Note: It is the metering that is affected by tilt/shift, not ...


9

This is one of the purposes of tilt-shift lenses, and they are often used in professional architectural photography to avoid distortions


9

Yes, you can use software like Hugin to correct this. The results may not be quite as good as a tilt-shift lens, but they will certainly good enough for printing except at the most humongous sizes. (A image like this with lots of horizontals and verticals will work great in Hugin as it will be very easy to set the control points.) Also, it will be much ...


9

I don't think it's really worth the expense of the 17mm tilt-shift lens for landscapes. Basically shifting allows you to capture more of your image without recomposing. For example if you wanted to capture more of the top of a building you could shift the lens down (which is effectively shifting the sensor up) and capture more of top of the image. Pointing ...


8

This is my intuitive understanding of the shift lens, based on the Wikipedia article, and especially the first diagram from that article: Let's say we want to shoot a tall building, where we stand at the base level. Our field of view doesn't allow the whole building to be captured in the frame. In fact, when the camera is level, half of the frame is ...


8

The tilt-shift lens is a classic way to do this. Simply tilt the focus plane to get the desired effect. There are cameras and software which emulate this by a 'Miniature Effect' function. AFAIK, this is pretty much achieved by making a gradually decreasing blur from the top-edge and bottom-edge of the photo, leaving a small portion in the middle sharp. ...


8

Well, to begin with, a tilt-shift lens is a rather limited substitute for a proper bellows setup with free movement of the front lens. Offering only shift or only tilt makes that even worse. That said, shift-only SLR lenses have been made, such as the 35mm Nikkor PC "Perspective Control" from the early sixties. Canon answered with a tilt-shift lens in 1973, ...


7

Figured I'd follow up my comment with an actual answer since I have the opposite opinion of Matt :) I own 3 of the Canon tilt shift lenses (90mm, 45mm, 24mm II) and I owned the 17mm as will until last month. The vast majority of what I like shooting is cityscapes/buildings and landscapes so the 24 TSE II gets a lot of use and its use isn't limited to just ...


7

Impossible to answer what the learning curve will be for you, but as general advice: if you're not already very skilled at manual focus, rent the lens for a minimum of 1 week additional before your travels. Leave the lens on your camera full-time and shoot often during that week to aid in learning the particulars of the lens and T/S in general, and become ...


7

(Note, this is based on my experience with the Canon 24mm TS-E which I assume is similar in operation to the 17mm) Tilt should always be set before shift as tilting in a particular direction also causes a noticeable shift effect in the same direction. The rotation of the lens controls how the rotation of the tilt axis can be made to relate to the scene ...


7

I think your first thought is correct. The "tilt/shift" (really just tilt in most cases) miniature model look is mostly to do with extremely shallow depth of field. In this case the most interesting building (to my eye) is the one in the bottom left which has blurred trees in front and behind giving the impression of very shallow depth of field. The other ...


7

Yes, you can change the relationship of the shift mechanism to the mount flange so that you can apply shift vertically when shooting in the portrait orientation. This is pretty much a design feature with most tilt/shift lenses designed for use on SLR type cameras. Where your lens, along with the TS-E 17mm f/4 L, expands the capability of other T/S lenses is ...


6

I believe the camera sold on Photojojo is actually made by NeinGrenze, and is listed on that website as the 5000T model. This tilt-shift style camera does not technically fit the "tilt-shift" definition in my opinion. The reason being that it is a fixed lens, therefore you do not have the option to actually do any tilting or shifting. You are forced to ...


6

Yes. The answer is given by the Scheimpflug principle: The focal plane, lens plane, and subject plane all intersect at a common line: Thus the angle of the subject plane depends not only on the lens tilt, but the distance of the subject. As the Wikipedia article states, the angle of tilt of the subject plane, ψ, is given by: tan(ψ) = (u'/f) sin (θ) ...


6

Shift does nothing for the miniature effect, though it may help with a particular composition. Tilt does the work, by simulating a much smaller depth of field. For this you need a relatively "flat" subject, e.g. the ground as seen from an elevated position. This is so the parts of the ground in front and behind the focal plane are thrown out of focus more ...


6

I believe part of the issue is the pseudo-thin DOF effect caused by the motion of the trees. The classic "miniature" effect is achieved by having a very thin DOF. Tilt/shift lenses are often used to simulate this effect at macro-scale because of their unique ability to shrink DOF without requiring extremely expensive f/0.7 lenses or extremely close subject ...


6

Changing aperture has the same overall effect on depth-of-field with a tilted lens that it has on an untilted lens. Tilting a lens changes the visible consequences of any change in aperture because it (when viewed sideways) changes the shape of the in-focus area from a rectangle to a wedge (with the point towards and above or below the camera, depending on ...


6

The focal length you want depends on what you want to do with it, and also if you want to use it on a crop camera, or full frame. I think that a very common purpose for a tilt shift lens is architecture, and for this I would suggest the wider lens of the two. The tilt shift possibilities of the two lenses are almost the same, but due to the different focal ...


6

Reasons for the price difference are: The TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II is part of Canon's luxury "L" series, whereas the 45mm is not The 24mm is a much newer digital era design (all lenses are discounted with age) The 24mm is a lot wider (see Why are wide-angle lenses so much more expensive?) Most uses for the tilt function are to maximise depth of field, so ...



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