Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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23

Having finished scanning 40 year old film I can assure you that you need to think longer term than 10 years, in fact at least 40 years. To know whether there is an answer one must understand the problem. These things can happen: proprietary software makers stop supporting old formats, very possible after 40 years. proprietary operating systems stop ...


22

Storing images as TIFF files is very space inefficient compared with raw, as TIFF images store three colours per pixel (at 8 or 16 bits per colour component, 24 or 48 total) compared to raw which just has the monochrome sensor data at 12 or 14 bits per pixel total. This monochrome data is interpolated into colour by exploiting the RGB colour filters placed ...


17

The short answer is: save it as a TIFF. PSD may once have been considered the more "native"/modern Photoshop format, but no longer. Jeff Schewe (the Photoshop Guru's Guru) advised way back in August 2007 on the Luminous Landscape forums that choosing TIFF over PSD was his strong recommendation. I quote: Look, I'll make it REAL simple... TIFF = ...


14

Noting other answers, and having had a bridge camera that did TIFFs, I'd suggest that for DSLRs TIFF is pointless except as an add on if it can be managed. TIFF is a lossless way of saving an image, once an image is generated, BUT the image that it saves is an interpretation of what the sensor records. RAW gives you the maximum possible flexibility ...


13

You explicitly mentioned PNG-24 - that has eight bits per channel, whereas a TIFF file can have 16. That would be one reason the quality could be higher, from a RAW conversion especially but also if you are doing a lot of editing. The PNG standard also supports 16-bits per channel (PNG-48) but I don't know how many applications support that, whereas pretty ...


11

These two formats are different: JPEG general info JPEG is used to store images on smaller disk space JPEG compression algorithm changes image data while converting it. Amount of change can be controlled but not its location which is always around sharp colour changes JPEG is primarily an RGB format If you'd be saving and opening the same image several ...


10

Take a look at Why don't most cameras support PNG format? for some other answers. Often cited reason is that the usual metadata (IPTC and EXIF of TIFF and JPG) is not very well supported by PNG and the software. PNG does support color profiles now, but it does not offer CMYK as TIFF does, because it is focused on web-usage. Anecdotal: I used to store ...


10

Setting a minimum filesize whilst fixing the image width and height is silly. If you don't use compression then the filesize is determined by the image dimensions. And if you do use compression then the filesize is determined by the level of entropy (disorder) in the image. Some images have higher entropy because there is more going on, more detail etc. in ...


9

Better is a relative term and, to some degree, will vary in terms of amount between the two depending on a variety of factors including the bit-depth, frequency of discrete colours, etc. Some experimentation may be necessary on this front, though my reading indicates LZW is good for lower bit-depth images with lots of the same colours and tones in it and ZIP ...


8

While TIFF is technically 'better' in that it is lossless, if you use high-quality JPEGs you will save yourself a lot of memory issues and you will probably not notice the difference in final quality. It may be worth checking with your print company to see what they recommend.


8

Adobe's Digital Negative format is an attempt to create a free open "universal" format explicitly to solve the issue of long term digital archiving. It is used natively by some cameras but not yet by the big two (Nikon/Canon). It is however easy to convert from Nikon/Canon Raw to DNG. It make take a little more time to see if DNG will gain traction in the ...


8

Question 1: Does it look good at that size? Your image will look good because most people will only look at it from afar. If it is at a trade show and depending on where exactly it is, no one may be able to get close to the image. Much more about this can be read here: How do I generate high quality prints with an ink jet printer? Using Patrick Hurley's ...


7

Fast Picture Viewer is $9.99 and works just fine on 64-bit Windows 7 (I'm using it myself). You can also install the 32-bit codec and then view the folder with Windows Live Photo Gallery, which will generate the thumbnails for you. Other applications, like Explorer, will then be able to use these thumbnails - but you'll have to reopen WLPG every time you ...


6

This is how things work when the Adobe "RAW Engines" don't match. Different versions of lightroom and photoshop have different internal engines, and when they match you should be able to seamlessly transfer the image back and forth. When the engines are incompatible, it saves the in-memory version of the image to a tiff (in order to avoid losing data) and ...


5

TIFF is more widely supported. Many programs don't deal with PSD because the format is very complicated. TIFF on the other hand is like a "standard" image format along with JPEG and PNG. Both TIFF and PSD can preserver layers information. Both of them can handle 16 and 32 bit image. However PSD can contain much more than that. Since it is the native ...


5

The file format is basically irrelevant What's much more important is the physical medium. Look at seven inch floppies, three inch, qic, sun scsi, pata, ... All these and more have gone and it will be more and more difficult to get drives, and even if you have drives, the interconnects for them. You will need to periodically update the physical media, then ...


5

While file formats may become obsolete it is not going to happen in one moment. After new format is introduced software will continue to support old one for some years - so you will have plenty of time to convert all your photos. Also in worst case you can always install old software (and if software no longer works on your system you can use virtual ...


5

TIFF is an image format, RAW is a data format. For longevity and to fight obsolescence, between the two, TIFF is the only sensible one. There are better formats though from an efficiency point-of-view that also are lossless, which I assume is what you were concerned about. PNG comes to mind as one of the best choices (as Reid suggested). OpenEXR is another ...


5

Fast Picture Viewer has an extensive pack for the low price of $9.99 and it appears to cover them all. They used to give the DNG one away for free (I'm using it), but I'm not sure if that is still the case.


5

You are not losing any quality. It is mostly a habit, I am guessing. Lots of books on digital imaging still suggest TIFF as the highest quality format. For non-technical people, that is all they need to know. Note both TIFF and PNG have higher bit-depths as well. Most people who still save in TIFF use 16-bits per-pixel, so the equivalent of PNG-48. If they ...


5

They do actually but not all of them. Even some bridge cameras can save as TIFF. Unfortunately, TIFF was given a bad name because its files were huge. Early on, compression was not used for TIFF files by digital cameras and so that gave rise to the files being huge which also slowed down the camera considerably. One of my first cameras used to take 24s to ...


5

Since you say you are a beginner and getting discouraged by having to deal with the tool chain for processing raw images, I suggest you don't for now. There is lots to learn, and some things will have to come before some others. Focus on what is fun and interesting at this point. Getting used to exposure, shutter speed versus f-stop versus depth of field ...


4

All you need do is install the relevent codecs, which are available from Canon for CR2/CRW (32-bit only), Nikon for NEF (32-bit only), Olympus (32-bit only), Panasonic (32-bit only), Pentax (32-bit only) & Sony (32-bit and 64-bit) The hack to run the 32-bit version of Windows Explorer (even on a 64-bit OS) no longer works on Windows 7, in my experience. ...


4

I would take a look at SmugMug and their SmugVault option. Details can be found at this link. With SmugVault you can upload RAW, TIFF, PDF, PSD, or even video files, at any size(up to 3GB each file). It is pretty reasonably priced, but it all depends on how much data you have, and how often you access it. Another option would be looking at something that ...


4

If the TIFF files are only 8bit and the resolution is the same then there will be very little (unless the JPEG compression is set very high). The only difference will be slight artefacts in high frequency areas and potentially lower colour resolution if chroma sub-sampling is used on the JPEGs. Additionally if the scan resolution itself is high compared to ...


4

The comments have really answered the question here: The behaviour you're seeing is as you should expect. The settings for adjustment layers alone have no equivalence in any of the TIFF content standards. TIFF does allow for vendor specific extensions and this would be an example of one but saving to a nonstandard TIFF would be pointless if nobody could ...


4

The only advantages to saving your RAW files as 8-bit is for memory conservation or if certain tools only work with 8-bit images. There is no advantage from a quality point of view, if you're going to do a lot of editing especially in a wide colour space then you may get posterisation when working with only 8 bits. Regarding colour spaces, it is advisable ...


3

You can change the file format passed back from Photoshop to Lightroom by changing Lightroom's settings. Preferences -> External Editing Here you can choose file format, bit depth and colour space. You might be able to reduce the size of the resulting TIFF/PSD files by choosing 8 bit colour depth instead of 16 bit. If you want to use TIFF, select ZIP ...


3

You could use ImageMagick to convert the tiff to multiple files then they will open fine in Lightroom convert multipage.tif single%d.tif


3

Difference of file size between a lossless TIFF and RAW is not huge. More time is needed to save a tiff than a raw, so to avoid delay in shots. Jpg will also take more time due to the processing, but will have a significant file size reduction, hence jpg was used.



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