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23

Storing images as TIFF files is very space inefficient compared with raw, as TIFF images store three colours per pixel (at 8 or 16 bits per colour component, 24 or 48 total) compared to raw which just has the monochrome sensor data at 12 or 14 bits per pixel total. This monochrome data is interpolated into colour by exploiting the RGB colour filters placed ...


7

Fast Picture Viewer is $9.99 and works just fine on 64-bit Windows 7 (I'm using it myself). You can also install the 32-bit codec and then view the folder with Windows Live Photo Gallery, which will generate the thumbnails for you. Other applications, like Explorer, will then be able to use these thumbnails - but you'll have to reopen WLPG every time you ...


6

TIFF is an image format, RAW is a data format. For longevity and to fight obsolescence, between the two, TIFF is the only sensible one. There are better formats though from an efficiency point-of-view that also are lossless, which I assume is what you were concerned about. PNG comes to mind as one of the best choices (as Reid suggested). OpenEXR is another ...


5

Fast Picture Viewer has an extensive pack for the low price of $9.99 and it appears to cover them all. They used to give the DNG one away for free (I'm using it), but I'm not sure if that is still the case.


4

All you need do is install the relevent codecs, which are available from Canon for CR2/CRW (32-bit only), Nikon for NEF (32-bit only), Olympus (32-bit only), Panasonic (32-bit only), Pentax (32-bit only) & Sony (32-bit and 64-bit) The hack to run the 32-bit version of Windows Explorer (even on a 64-bit OS) no longer works on Windows 7, in my experience. ...


2

It's now 18 months since the question was asked ... :-) In the beginning I have stored my photos in RAW but I realised its a pain ... Is it okay to store it in TIFF format? No! Not if you do not want to lose "data". If data loss is not important to you then any format that meets your needs and standards can be used. TIFF is an interpretation of ...


1

In the folder press ALT and T to bring up the 'Tools' menu. Select 'Folder Options'. Select 'View' Tab. In the Advanced Settings first item at the top is 'Always show icons, never thumbnails'. Untick it.


1

Last time I used Aperture, I went into my iPhoto/Aperture Library file. It appears as a package/single-file in Finder, but it's actually just a folder. Control-click or use Right-Click on a two button mouse (a.k.a. "Secondary Click," many ways to use this) and select "Show Package Contents. Through here you will be able to navigate to various folders with ...


1

Interesting discussion, one that has led me to some conclusions of my own. To comment on one of the above answers: "Consider the difference in value of an original print by Ansel Adams vs. a print from the same negative by a different printmaker." I think the art world would value that specific print; but if the negative were somehow destroyed, that would ...


1

There are very good reasons to save the raw and equally good reasons to save it as a TIFF - even without considering the preview. (this answer assumes you want to keep the images for the long term, if you only care about the next few months you can ignore it) Raw is the original, it is the only original, converting to TIFF loses data and editing options - ...


1

I found a tool called MysticThumbs, which supports a wide variety of formats. It has a free trial, but costs $15. The DNG thumbnails have not appeared yet...not sure if there is a bug or not. Every other image format on my system has a thumbnail now, however.



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