Serene Life

by garik

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29

One of the easiest choices is to buy brand name batteries. From batch to batch the manufacturer takes quality and performance very seriously. You know and I know that in general there will be no lemons. Generic batteries can be made by any number of manufacturers and they all take on the challenge with different perspectives. And as a result if you were to ...


14

There are enough variations in lenses that it's hard to make a generalization about an entire brand vs. another. A lot of folks stick to the lenses from their camera manufacturer and I think that in the past the quality tended to be better. That said, some of the third party lens manufacturers have some great lenses, and some of the lenses by Nikon and ...


13

Amazon has the LP-E5 for $39.99 USD. To me, after buying a $500+ camera, a $40 second battery is a no brainer. I still have the original BP-511a that I purchased for $70 from Canon for my 20D in 2005 (it's now in my 40D), and I purchased a second LP-E6 for $79 for my 5D Mark II. In nearly 5 years of shooting, I've spent a total of $149 for camera ...


13

This will not be a problem. Milliamp-hours are a rating of the capacity of the battery (metaphorically, the size of the gas tank), and having extra won't cause any harm. (Basically, it's how long the power will last, not how strong it is.) It's possible but unlikely that cost-cutting in the battery may have other, more problematic issues, but many people use ...


9

I had a super cheap non-Canon battery in my 400D and it was as good as the Canon one. But I wouldn't trust a sample of 1 if I were you ;) Although you mention in the details you have a 450D, I'll add an answer to the generic Canon question for others that may read this. For some Canon cameras (such as the 7D) the battery holds special information ...


9

If your interest is primarily the optics, you need to look at individual lenses, not brands as a whole. You can't depend on a Nikkor (or Canon, Pentax, Sony, etc.) necessarily being sharper than something like a Sigma, Tokina or Tamron. OTOH, unless you're pretty sure you're buying a lens to keep it forever, the third party lenses don't seem to be nearly ...


9

Third party lenses are generally safe to use. The only situation that is likely to damage the camera is if the lens focuses light weirdly and so creates a part of the camera a lot hotter than usually or overloads the sensor. This is very unlikely. Third party lenses (especially from manufacturers such as Tamron, Tonkina and Sigma) are usually of equal (and ...


7

Personally I have a 70-200 2.8 IS. Yes it cost a lot, and yes it is heavy, but the results from it speak for themselves. But having said that, you need to pick a lens that is going to meet your needs (i.e. what sort of photos you plan on taking with it). I have a friend who uses a 70-200 F4 (non-IS) and is very happy with the results. Likewise I know ...


7

I can't speak for Canon cams, but in the Nikon world generally one should stick with Nikon brand batteries. Particularly for the batteries from eBay, sometimes one gets a battery which is fine and of essentially the same quality as the Nikon batteries, and sometimes it's wretched junk. There's no way to tell. Poor-quality Li-ion batteries also run the (very ...


7

I've always been loyal to buying Canon's own batteries, as I've seen the damage that counterfeit lithium batteries have done to a friend's laptop. Of course, this is unlikely with third party batteries (and you've got to be fairly unlucky with a counterfeit one), but why risk £1000 worth of camera body for the sake of saving £25?


5

I think that there is not a problem here and it is not a copyright grab. Why? Two reasons: First, see the first sentence in Part 2a: You can purchase the photographs featured on our Web site from ezprints in the form of photographic prints, or other photographic products such as picture frames or photo- albums (collectively, the "Products"). ...


5

In the last 6 years I owned several Pentax and Nikon DSLRs and batteries, original and generics. For any cam I owned I bough original batteries as well as generics. Usually, generic batteries worked great ... in the first few months. After those they tended to let me down, sometimes quickly. Worst case was one shoot where two generic batteries both died ...


5

I have a Tamron 70-200 2.8. It gets the job done and I've used it plenty for stage photography, but I always wish I forked over that little bit extra for the Canon. My particular lens always hunts and has problem with moving the autofocus motor.


5

I have 3 generic and one Canon for my 450D. Two years later, the generic ones still work, the Canon died. I've never found any difference between them other than the Canon one dying (and well, all batteries die eventually, I'm not saying generics are better because of this). I spent about $5 per generic battery on ebay including delivery... frankly I can't ...


5

It looks like the Energizer compatible offers less longevity: 800-970mAh (depends on the exact subtype of the Energizer one) vs. the official 1080mAh of the Canon brand. I could not find any information about the Energizer providing any of the data feedback, such as power level and the like. I did find several sellers that made a key point out about how to ...


4

I used generic BP-511 batteries from Sterlingtek.com in my Canon 20D, 40D, and 5D for 6 years. They were $11, and most outlasted the $60 Canon brand batteries. In the last order of 4 batteries I bought 2 were defective. I couldn't get them to hold much of a charge. I probably bought about a dozen over the years, and all but those 2 worked great.


4

I've always bought both OEM and 3rd party batteries in the past to compare and see what is a better value. The answer to this question does vary a bit depending on what 3rd party/generic battery in particular that you are talking about. Some perform better, some worse. I personally use the Amazon reviews as a signal to how many people have had success or ...


4

I've been using ezprints since 2003, and Smugmug (one of the most photographer friendly and trusted services around) also recommends and uses them. They are a good company, and I 100% recommend them. I think their legalese is not as clear as it could be, and in some cases, pretty stupid (like you can't make a link to ezprints??!?) but here is how I ...


4

Sigma flashes will do as claimed, so I think you're safe there. The only downside, from my experience, is that the interface for them is less then stellar. However, other than that, the flashes are very good. Another, which is a cut above Sigma, is Metz. If Metz has claimed support for Canon, the flash will do what is advertised for it, the company has a ...


4

I like mine a lot for indoor-shooting of parties. Nice and bright, have to step down a bit for max sharpness, but even then it will be brighter than your current 5.6 at the long end of 50mm. At a wedding I saw it been used by the professional hired there for the people-shooting too (note 1: it was our wedding-photographer too, but we weren't the one who ...


4

I've written an article about this very thing, http://www.x100enthusiasts.com/discussion/80/batteries-chargers-power-management-finepix-x100-user-guide I've been using a MaxPower brand generic for 5 weeks now without issue. Other users have reported similar experiences in the comments.


4

Maybe, but Probably Not Third party batteries vary in quality and capacity, but their actual danger is massively exaggerated. Furthermore, the Chinese battery failures generally happen when the device is charging. Unless you have a camera which lets you charge your battery in the camera, even a spectacular failure will not likely damage the camera itself, ...


4

For lenses: overall build quality and durability (how long the lens will last) smoothness of zoom and focus, zoom creep materials - metal or plastic barrel and mount, glass or plastic lens elements optics number and design of elements (two similar lenses may have a different number and configuration of elements and this may affect the performance of the ...


4

In general hoods are not interchangeable, the mounting mechanism is more complex than a screw thread. There are probably examples of hoods that can be shared but this is the exception rather than the rule. You can buy generic rubber hoods which are designed to fit on most lenses. The same is true of tripod collars, unless you're lucky. There is a large ...


3

I think the question is a bit subjective, however, I will say that Nikon makes some very, very, good lenses and at the high end they are hard to beat. Sigma and Tamron also make some very good lenses, including some that nobody else has (for example, Sigma has the widest rectilinear lens on the market for SLRs at 8mm). And all three make lenses that are, ...


3

As always, the answer is to choose carefully! From experience I can say that although both Nikkor lenses and Sigma lenses cover a range of quality and price, Sigma covers a wider range. By that I mean that the worst Sigmas are quite bad and the top ones are absolutely superb. My absolute favorite Sigma for example is the 100-300mm F/4. It is extremely ...


3

Slrgear.com have this to say about the lens This was another lens that was a really pleasant surprise when we ran it through its paces in our test lab; its performance was really excellent in practically every parameter, and it sells for a very attractive price. At its maximum aperture (a very wide and constant f/2.8), it's blur plot is remarkably ...


3

The chances are high. Nikon started putting holograms on their batteries so they would be recognized as originals because some fakes burst into flames after some use. Most importantly, is why are you even considering this? You paid good money for a nice camera and you want to risk it by saving some money on a cheap battery? If the one you have is not ...


3

No. The Jessops 360AFD is almost certainly a relabeled version of the Tumax DPT386AFZ. This flash is made by Icorp Development Ltd., a Hong Kong company which makes low-cost reverse-engineered dedicated system flashes sold under the Tumax brand and also as what they call "private label" products. Other versions of this flash, or other models from Tumax, are ...


3

Here are answers for your questions based on my YN-465 and all the research I did before getting it: What are most common issues that would require repair of a speedlite? The number one cause of speedlight damage is dropping it - if you drop it and you are unlucky it will break. The "professional" series (models 5xx) are supposedly much better at ...



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