Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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9

To put it plainly, lighting matters, because it brings up shadows that show the texture. I don't really know how to explain this in geometrical terms, so I'm going to present my T-shirt as an example.


5

Light matters, a lot, especially in how it's used. Harsh, direct on, light such as that from a camera mounted flash can flatten an image and lose texture. Softer, indirect light, can help bring out the texture. Learning to light well is as much an art as photography is as a whole and it's beyond me to describe it to you, especially here. Fortunately, there ...


4

It's much easier to get a realistic looking background in camera. It's much easier to get a nice looking background in Photoshop. Some people's philosophy is to do as much as possible in camera and leave Photoshop out of the equation or only only as a last resort. Some people's philosophy is to get the highest quality results possible using whatever tools ...


4

While the camera and lens are obviously going to have an impact on your success, I have to think that a good solid grasp on lighting techniques is going to have more impact on shooting textures than the camera will. Just about any current DSLR (or even high-end P&S), ideally with a low-distortion prime lens, should give you plenty of technology to get ...


4

Reid. Don't throw your blacks into the pits of despair! Just don't tone so aggressively. That's the easy answer. Here's the more involved answer. I'm not sure what your end game is: print, web, tele, all have different sensitivities. But the general approach I would use goes like this. Process your RAW as you have, then hop into PS (I did my best to ...


3

You are right that curves is the way to increase detail at certain brightness levels. The steepness of the line dictates contrast (and hence detail). You only have so much "height" to play with so making the line steeper in one place (e.g. the shadows) means it must be shallower elsewhere. If you're careful you can make the line shallow in an unimportant ...


3

Especially for skin, the main thing is the position of the light. Specifically, you want the light positioned so the direction of the light is almost directly along the surface of the skin. This creates very bright highlights on every protrusion and harsh, deep shadows in every "valley", bringing the texture into dominance.


2

Your main concerns are going to be: As you say, the ability shoot in RAW. Relatively noise-free output (but this requirement is mitigated by the ability to heavily post-process and downsize). A good, sharp, distortion-free lens. For the resolution you suggest, you should be able to get good results from a high-quality point & shoot (like the Canon ...


2

I'd recommend looking at a high-quality compact (Canon G12, Olympus XZ-1, a few others) that let you shoot RAW. Those have a few advantages over DSLRs that a texture-hunter might find useful: They typically have a 'macro' mode that allows you to focus within a few inches without needing a dedicated macro lens They're very small, so you’re more likely ...


1

I don't think there's a specific unifying name you could apply to the look in the images in your examples, primarily because they don't have a unifying look to be named. That said, the technique which would most typically be used to achieve the effect that you describe yourself desiring would be the high-pass filter, which adds that extra bit of ...


1

I think it depends on what you want to achieve. In my opinion, if a viewer says "nice photoshop" then I have failed in processing. It would be like saying of a painting that you like the brushstrokes without commenting on the content of the work. The best background is less dependant on what is real or manufactured and more on what makes the composition ...


1

I would suggest a full-frame DSLR, either the Canon 5D Mark II or the Nikon D700. Full-frame because you can then use the macro lenses optimized for flat-field rendering, and still have a decently wide field of view. The lenses are the EF 50mm f/2.5 for Canon, and the Micro-Nikkor 60mm f/2.8G for Nikon. Nikon has had these kinds of lenses in production ...


1

Basically it's high contrast. You can increase the contrast with a harder light setting, i.e. a bright light source and low ambient light. In post processing you can increase the contrast setting. Adobe Camera Raw (and probably others) also has a setting called Clarity that can be used to increase the contrast locally to enhance details. Using sharpening ...



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