Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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14

USB 1.1/2.0 specifies a maximum cable length of 5 meters (~16 feet) as a function of a minimum required transmission speeds. That's pushing the limit, to some degree, and will be highly dependent on how well the cable is made, shielding, etc. If you're worried about reliability, I would go under that, probably no more than 3 meters (~10 feet). USB 3.0 ...


12

Based on the reading of the battery spec, no. The battery pack supplies 7.4v, while USB can only supply 5v. However, you can buy the ACK-E2 wall power kit to power the camera directly from a standard outlet.


10

I have 2 12' long active repeater cables and a 6' usb cable I have successfully daisy chained ONE of them from an actively powered USB hub to control my Canon 5Dmk2. As far as I can tell, you can't put a second one on the chain without another power source. I have seen 16' repeaters advertised for ~20USD. So in my successful setup it was: Mac -- 3' USB ...


9

It's called tethered shooting, and is mostly used in studios; as you say, it's not exactly a portable setup. It has the advantage of letting you write photos direct to disk, bypassing the memory card, and as you said, you can see a photo preview large and on-screen before shooting, like a high-res version of live view. Press photographers at football ...


8

I don't know of any that can be tethered to a PC. However the open source CHDK firmware for Cannon cameras support on camera scripting that may fulfill your needs. Alternatively for any camera that has support for an external shutter release you can drive that shutter release externally from a PIC or a USBIO module attached to a PC.


8

Let's tackle your questions separately: Film Camera The short answer is 'no.' There is no marketed utility that I'm aware of which would give you complete control over a film camera (even a relatively modern one). Now I can imagine a it would be possible (and even potentially relatively easy) to put together a DIY solution as long as the camera is recent ...


8

You should be able to use the Canon EOS Utility that comes with the camera in order to shoot tethered right outta the box. Once you've installed the Canon EOS Utility (on the CD that came with your camera), then a simple USB cable (should have also come with your camera in the box, but you might want to get a longer one if you want to get farther from your ...


8

By feeding the output of the camera to the laptop you can see what the camera is seeing in real time if you can't be behind the camera. You can position the laptop where you can see it's screen, then you can press the remote shutter release at exactly the right moment to capture the shot you are after. Most useful, if, like the photographer in this case, ...


6

Most modern dSLRs from both canon and nikon offer this capability, and have developer programs offering an API to help you with your code. There's such a wide range of options that you probably should start with some other criteria first, and come back and filter by this one later in the decision making process.


6

You could use an Eye-Fi Pro Card and an Application on the iPad (or iPhone or Andriod phone or laptop ect.) to read it. There are a few options for an App. There is the FREE eye-fi iPhone app or you could have a look at Shutter Snitch App which is relativity cheap. I have not used this approach myself so I cannot say if it is any good however it might do ...


6

Whilst there is support for using the Canon 350D in a tethered mode, with "remote" shooting, there is no control over the zoom other than manual intervention; as that camera does not support video, or even "live view", or wouldn't be able to see how the photograph would look before shooting it -- depending on your scenario, you could just shoot and reshoot ...


6

There are a couple of factors that come into play here: Regarding "off the shelf options", I'd be surprised if there were any, as different lenses have differing dimensions, so you would need a different controller per lens. The other option would be for SLR lens to incorporate motors for zooming, but I'm not aware of any manufacturer with this feature at ...


6

If you're on Windows, then you'd use the "EOS Utility" application (which you can download from Canon if you haven't already got it). This application supports: Functions for downloading and displaying images Remote shooting, and camera control of each setting when an EOS DIGITAL camera is connected to a computer


6

Adobe Lightroom does all of the above (apart from the VirtueMart part, sorry!). Tethering (for Canon, Nikon and Leica) and your first four wishlist items are supported right out of the box. The CSV export feature can be added with Timothy Armes' brilliant LR/Transporter plugin.


6

It is impossible with Lightroom as the camera is not supported. See the supported list. You will have to find other tethering software and check their requirements one-by-one. As a general rule, if your camera is neither Canon nor Nikon, there are far less chances of being supported by anyone else than the manufacturer. So, check with Sony first, they may ...


5

The only option I can see, right now, is using gPhoto for this but since I primarily use Linux in a server role, I might be missing some. Anyways, there's a pretty good tutorial on using gPhoto this way available here: Linux.com and that might do the trick for you.


5

There is free software that actually comes with your camera that can do this, its called EOS Utility, you can also download it from here. In addition to that you can also use the Tethered shooting option in Lightroom 3


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


5

Most tethering softwares that list support for Nikon cameras do not include the D3xxx series. Most of the Dx, Dxx, and some of the D7xxx and D5xxx bodies are at least partially supported. The D3100's firmware or hardware may limit this capability. If all you want to do is view the output of your camera without controlling it, you just need to connect it to ...


4

There is a description here that shows how you can do this, but it seems a bit of a convoluted solution. I don't there is (currently) anything that allows you to link an iPad to a WiFi enabled DSLR directly. But I certainly wouldn't rule it out from ever happening.


4

As others have said, if you use Windows or Mac OS-X, then you can use the EOS Capture utility which is part of Canon Digital Photo Professional (DPP) - You can install this from one of the disks that came with your camera, and then update it from here. An alternative, if you're a Lightroom 3 user, would be to do the tethered capture from within Lr itself, ...


4

The EOS Utility, via its Camera Settings/Remote Shooting module will let you Live View your pictures as you shoot them. It will also set you change the image settings (speed, aperture, ISO, etc.) via the PC. No special cable is required, just a regular mini-USB cable, which was supplied with your camera. Note that for focusing purposes you don't really need ...


4

The "Olympic Journey" exhibition at the Royal Opera House this summer had much the same problem, only with the Olympic torch rather than the FA Cup. As far as I can tell they went for your bespoke solution: a simple PHP website where you could enter your unique code and retrieve your photo. The site is still up, at http://theolympicjourneytorchphoto.com. As ...


4

The phrase you want to google for is "tethering" It can be wired or wireless. The cheapest solution is wired, you just plug in a USB cable (if your camera has a USB port, all Canon's do, so I assume Nikons do as well) between the camera and your laptop. Check the CD that came with your camera, there is probably a tethering utility on it. I know there is on ...


4

You could try digiCamControl. One of its advanced features is Live View via computer display. However, the D3100 may not support that feature. The Nikon SDK allows you to capture Live View images as JPGs. So a program could be written to loop, capture and display those JPGS. Someone has written a C# wrapper for the SDK which gives an example of this ...


4

D3100 cannot support the feature that you want to implement, but the new Nikon D3200 has change the image of the D3xxx series. with the help of WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter, you can connect it to the DSLR, to automatically send your images to your Smart phone and even use your smartphone to remotely capture images from D3200 and D5200. I'm not sure if it ...


4

Absolutely. There is a great dongle+app, offered by TriggerTrap. I purchased it and I'm supper happy with it. If I recall correctly, the app is available for iOS and Android. EDIT: Some of the free app's options are as follows: Simple cable release Press and hold Press and lock Timed release Timelapse TimeWarp (time lapse + acceleration) DistnaceLapse ...


3

Without any software involved you can connect most Live-View to a display. That is, you connect your camera to a HDTV, LCD monitor or even a projector. Anything with an HDMI input. Actually, the same is true of the A/V output. A special cable is included with almost every camera to connect it to an analog TV. Make sure to select the right one of NTSC or ...


3

No, this is not supported on any operating system. I do not know of any recent camera to do that unfortunately. PS: Some people have hacked Canon firmware to do things that are not supported. Whether it is possible or not, I do not know, but you can check this to see.



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