Before the rush

Before the rush
by evan-pak

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2

A full-frame lens of any focal length (let's say 200mm) and an APS-C lens of the same focal length (i.e. 200mm) are the same (in this context). The difference is only in the size of the 'image circle' that the lens projects; the full-frame lens projects a larger image circle to cover the larger size of the full-frame sensor. So in your comparison, there are ...


1

No, it'll give you a smaller range. The numbers quoted on any system camera lens are the actual focal length, not the equivalent. You can get a longer range with a 70-300mm fairly easily, but the difference won't be huge - you'd barely notice it in reality. More than that is available but expensive and heavy. I'd suggest you'll do best by looking at the ...


2

No, a 70-200mm lens will give you less range than a 55-250mm lens on both ends of the focal lengths. In order to understand the comparative fields of view yielded by an EF-S and an EF lens on an APS-C camera body in terms of the same field of view on a full frame/35mm camera, you must multiply the focal length of both lenses by the 1.6X crop factor. Your EF-...


2

As @inkista explains, the "times-zoom" notation is just a relative measure, and doesn't tell you anything absolute. This is different from binoculars, where the number actually means how much bigger the subject appears than with the naked eye — that's because cameras project what's known as a "real image" onto the sensor or film, whereas binoculars form a "...


7

It's impossible to say. This is because a "zoom factor" is a relative measurement, not an absolute one. 10x zoom doesn't mean the picture is enlarged 10x. All that the zoom factor is telling you is how much longer the longest focal length of the lens is from the shortest one. Both a 5-50mm and a 50-500mm lens are 10x zooms. But they have vastly different ...


3

A 10x simply means that the longest (most "zoomed in") focal length is 10x longer than than widest focal length. This has the effect that everything in the photo is 10x bigger. It's a ratio, and doesn't have any meaning in meters or feet. It doesn't mean that it's as if you were 1 foot away instead of 10 feet. In fact, if you took photo with a wide angle ...


2

Try holding the unmounted lens and moving the aperture linkage while looking through the lens. If it is a little stiff at first and then moves freely after a couple of cycles from one end of the lever's movement to the other then that's probably all you need to do. Next time be sure the lens is in dry air and at ambient temperature before storing it away ...



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