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by Bart Arondson

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26

There are several related questions here. Are mirror lenses good at all (opinion) Are mirror lenses good for wldlife shots in daylight. Are cheap mirror lenses value for money. Relevant: I own a Minolta 500mm AF f8 "Reflex" lens- the only model of AF "mirror" lens ever made AFAIK and one of the better quality ones around. I think that as long as you ...


24

The biggest reason for difference in the two lenses is aperture. The 80-200mm is a constant f/2.8 throughout the focal range and the 18-200mm varies from f/3.5 to f/5.6, so substantially slower, especially at the far end. All this really means is that the 80-200 can let in more light at the same focal length over the other. Also, generally, zooms with ...


23

I would say it really depends on if you have a SLR, DSLR or P&S (Point-and-Shoot) - and maybe even possibly it more (or less) depends if the sensor is CCD or CMOS. My own experiences says it doesn't occur with P&S cameras - ever. I have 4 cheap P&S (Canon PowerShot) cameras which I have used exclusively over the years for shooting time-lapse ...


23

Those are done using the compression of a telephoto lens. Longer lenses will magnify the subject, so will make the moon look bigger. It will also make buildings and other objects bigger, but by moving yourself further away from those earthbound objects you can reduce them back to a smaller size. But you can't really get further away from the moon, so it ...


22

Taking direct photos of the sun can destroy your camera, not to mention your eyes. It's exactly as you are afraid, the lens will act as a magnifier and multiply the suns intensity right on your cameras internals. What this effects can vary. Long exposures against the sun can cause permanent damage to your camera's sensor, but besides that, your camera's ...


20

The flattening or compression effect is not caused by a particular kind of lens, it applies to all lens in the same way. Actually, this property of lenses applies to our own eyes as well. The factor that affects flattening is the distance from the camera to the subjects. Consider the following exercise: Place two friends 1 meter away from each other. ...


19

A 200mm lens is in the category of lenses called "fixed focal length" or "prime", which cannot zoom in and out. The more common lens type is the zoom, which does allow you to zoom in and out. The primary tradeoffs between prime and zoom lenses are: Aperture - Typically, prime lenses tend to operate at wider maximum aperture than zooms. For instance, ...


18

The focal length of a lens determines its field of view on your camera. If it has a long focal length, it has a narrow field of view, making the things in front of you appear large in the photograph. If it has a short focal length, it has a large field of view--it's a "wide angle" lens that takes in a large area, making objects appear small. A "zoom lens" ...


17

Technically 'Telephoto' means that the focal length [the mm] is longer than the lens is. In my experience, people in the photography world usually don't talk about it under that definition. Most of the time people say 'Telephoto' they just mean 'zoomed in' or in other words 'high mm' or 'long focal length' As has been mentioned, Nikon seems to say that 85mm ...


16

As an owner and user of both the 450D and the EF 100-400mm, I can offer some help here. From a construction, durability, and handleability perspective, using the 100-400mm on the 450D will definitely not be a problem. Both the camera and the lens are durably built, and the lens mount can handle a considerable amount of rugged use and rough handling. The ...


16

Firstly words, even technical terms, change meaning over time with usage. "Prime" originally meant the primary lens of a multi-lens cine camera. Now it means a lens with fixed focal length (sometime incorrectly called a fixed-focus lens). While we're on the subject, telephoto isn't even nearly the most incorrectly used term (that would almost certainly be ...


16

I believe the effect has to do with the RATIO of distances from the camera to various parts of the subject / scene. For example, if you take a wide-angle shot of a person's face, their features are exaggerated because the camera-to-nose distance might be half of the camera-to-ear distance. On the other hand, consider the same shot taken with a telephoto ...


15

One aspect of this comparison that has not been mentioned is the fact that crop-sensor cameras are generally faster for a given price point. The 7D shoots at up to 8 Frames/Sec, the 5D manages 3.9 Frames/Sec The 1Ds III manages 5 Frames/Sec, while the 1D III/IV manages 10 Frames/Sec In sports photography, where continuous drive is often used, those extra ...


15

my (beginners) understanding of landscape photos is that you generally want them to be with a wide-angle lens My understanding of landscape photos is that they should contain some landscape! I can understand the association with wide angle lenses, though. You typically want to get a lot in, a photo of a rock is not a landscape photo. Any focal length ...


14

Sports in general means stopping the action. Kids are slower than pro athletes, but you still need a good range in shutter speed. With that in mind, IS/VR is no use because both technologies prevent camera shake at slower shutter speeds, and obviously slower shutter speeds does the exact opposite of stopping the action. However, IS/VR is nice for low-light, ...


14

Nobody is saying that you must choose an 80-200 over an 18-200. An 80-200 (f/2.8) has some severe drawbacks compared to an 18-200, price, size and weight being among them besides the obviously limited zoom range. On the other hand, an 80-200 is far better behaved optically; it will tend to focus faster and more accurately (on a given camera body, and ...


14

It's very hard to say without knowing your photography style and common usage. I think the simplest explanation of stabilisation is "it's like having a cheap, flimsy tripod on your camera at all times... without the hassle of a tripod". It can be incredibly beneficial, and it can be useless (and a battery drain). Personally, I shoot a lot of (non-sporting) ...


13

Changing lenses is the single best thing about having a DSLR, if you want 12x zoom and macro ability without ever changing lenses you want a bridge camera. Changing lenses often isn't bad for the camera per se, I go through days when I do 10 or 20 lens changes. The wear on the mount is totally negligible. Whilst you obviously want to keep the inside of your ...


13

Most prime macro lenses are suitable for distant subjects. However, there are some exceptions: the king of macro photography, Canon MP-E 65, will not focus far enough to fit more than an eye or nose on a portrait; some macro lenses, like Pentax DA 35 Limited Macro, have a short focal length -suitable for distant subjects only as environmental shots showing ...


12

Try taking some pictures from a little closer, and see if the problem doesn't go away. It's quite normal for almost all pictures taken at a substantial distance to look somewhat washed out. The dust/haze/smog/pollution/heat waves/etc., in the air reflect and refract light enough to reduce the contrast and wash out colors. This tends to be at a minimum after ...


12

'End' in this case is just referring to the end of the zoom range available. So zooming in on an 18-55 lens would take you to the 55mm end of the zoom range, which would be the telephoto end, and the 18 mm end of the zoom range would be the wide angle 'end' (although on this lens the telephoto end isn't very telephoto). So while it may sound like a physical ...


12

There is no answer to your general question. Prime lenses are usually sharper than zooms at the same focal-length and aperture, mostly at wider apertures when the sensor out-resolves the lens. At one point lenses can out-resolve the sensor and then you will see equal sharpness in your images despite a potential difference in lens sharpness. If someone were ...


12

Absolutely. Even if price is not an issue, an F/4 lens offers an important saving in weight. Now, it is important to understand that aperture is one difference but the most significant is image quality. A cheap 55-200mm is rather poor and you have to stop it down to F/8 or even F/11 to get decent results which is very restrictive. Still you can get a high ...


12

The largest galaxy (other than the Milky Way) in the sky is that of the Andromeda galaxy and is clearly visible in the night sky of the northern hemisphere with the naked eye - if you know where to look (and realize that fuzzy thing is just lots of stars). The apparent dimensions of the galaxy is 190' x 60' (or about 3° x 1°). To put that in context, the ...


10

As a really, really broad generalization, it's easier to make a high-quality zoom lens with a smaller zoom range, rather than a larger one. Although it's really tempting to look for one zoom that'll cover your entire range of shooting (Tamron's 18-270 comes to mind), these lenses tend to be fairly ill-behaved over portions of their range (at least), and ...


10

The tamron 28-300 is a fascinating and frustrating lens. It doesn't go wide enough (on a cop sensor camera like the 500d or 7d, I'd want the wide angle for landscape to be more liky 15-17 and not 28; it makes me want to add the sigma 10-20 to my arsenal). And at the telephoto end, it goes soft like most super zooms do. I try not to use it much past 28-150 ...


10

There's two things at issue here. The first is zoom range, which is the longest focal length a zoom lens has divided by the shortest. That is, a lens which goes between 25mm equivalent focal length and 150mm is a "6x" zoom lens. This terminology is usually reserved for point and shoot cameras; for SLR lenses, one usually gives the actual focal lengths ...


10

It depends on where she's feeling the limitations. I have a kit made up of 15mm, 40mm, and 70mm prime lenses (on a dSLR with the same 1.5× format as the Nikon D90), and for me, that's just about right. (I'd probably trade the 40mm for a 35mm were I starting over — tough call.) For my style, I don't miss having a zoom at all. Since she has (and is presumably ...


10

It's all about foreshortening, the effect by which the depth of the scene appears compressed. Different focal lengths just permit you to be different distances from your subject and still give the appropriate framing. Subject distance is the key value here. If you are a kilometre away from your subject, then the tip of their nose is a kilometre away, as are ...



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