Incense

by Bart Arondson

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-3

It's not really possible, because the way film works and sensors work is completely different. Sensor cells accept light from the front only and are not affected by light striking adjacent cells. The crystals of silver bromide in film are sensitive to light striking them from any angle, so light bouncing around inside the emulsion causes film images to look ...


3

I don't see a huge amount of commonality in your examples. The most common "vintage look" we get asked about is usually a lifted black point (so the darkest blacks are actually gray) along with color shifts (blue, yellow, green...). (See How can this brightly colored yet gentle pastel-color effect be achieved?) for an example.) But I don't see that here, ...


1

Vintage look comes from postprocessing of colors (lower color temperature, lifted black point, less saturation, less contrast, less blue component, a bit of purple tinting) and certain effects simulating lens deficiencies, such as blurs, vignetting, reflections because of improper lens coatings, etc.) Crispness comes from local contrast enhancements. (None ...


2

The contrast in this photo is very high - the light in the background is obviously very bright, but the face is pretty much in shadow. To get the face lighter by only changing settings in the camera can be done 3 ways: Bigger aperture (smaller 'f' number): you were already at the biggest your lens can do at f/1.8 and from what I've seen, that's generally ...


0

Lets assume in the next scenario you are shooting wide open at the slowest feasible shutter speed. Take home message don't be afraid to use a high ISO in this situation. Prepare a couple more things before composing the photo. Set up a spot meter rather than average meter. This will mean that any intense lights or extreme darks don't skew the EV reading. ...


2

Set the shallowest acceptable DOF (this will depend on your distance from subject as @Philip mentions) Set the slowest acceptable shutter speed. Resting the camera, leaning against a wall, or using a monopod or tripod can help lower this speed. The movement of the subject also has an impact of course, but for a portrait type of shot in your example it can ...


0

Raising the ISO, opening the diaphragm, and increasing the shutter speed are the only ways to go, as said above. But be careful with the aperture and the shutter speed: your bright objects will be burnt. Typically, for the picture above, I would have shot it that way, and then post-processing it. On the pictures you take, you should have a look quickly at ...


1

You might want to try and use the spot meter setting instead of the average. In the picture you posted there is a bright object on the right side that is throwing off the rest of the picture.


1

A few things I would consider are: How close to the original exposure is the photo and what determined the 3 main factors: shutter speed, aperture and iso? If you shoot in manual mode you will have chosen these settings yourself (if you set these yourself I would suggest increasing the iso to at least 3200 and your shutter speed to about 1/30th (tell the ...


2

Ignoring the white balance issue which is easily fixed in post, there's a couple of technical things you could look at to improve sharpness: Shutter speed. The general rule of thumb is that you want your shutter speed to be 1/effective focal length. In your case, that would be 35mm * 1.5 ~ 50 and therefore you'd want a shutter speed of 1/50s - but you've ...


0

With RAW, you don't worry about the white balance when shooting. The ISO is misunderstood and overused with RAW: if the image is too dark, turning up the ISO is no different than fixing it in Lightroom (but explainaions I've read don't consider quantization of the A-to-D step). However, the extended range or whatever that brand calls it can help if the ...


2

Improving the lighting would be the first thing to do. On your shot, the face of the person is practically unlit, as well as the background, resulting in too much contrast with blown whites on the right. The fact that the brightest light is facing the camera creates lens ghosts, which is probably not what you want. If you're unable to change lighting, then ...



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