Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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0

Your primary lens should be the 18-55mm. Helicopters have very few air restrictions and therefore will be getting close to the landscape. The wide angle will also reduce blur from vibration and movement. A circular polarizer will only be needed if sunny. Skip it on a cloudy day to keep your shutter speed high. Only exception is if your shots are getting ...


0

I agree with most of what John Thomas said, but have a few minor differences. Shutter speed will certainly be the most important, but even on a fairly cheap body, you'll be shooting in broad daylight, so it shouldn't be that big of a problem. Just make sure to shoot Tv mode so that you can ensure the shutter speed stays fast. The circular polarizer is ...


0

Do not let any part of your camera or lens to make contact with the helicopter. Keep the image stabilizer on and use a fast shutter-speed. You biggest enemy is vibration so these together will reduce how many blurry shots you get. Increase your odds of getting a sharp image but using continuous drive too. You can keep the hood on which is always a good ...


1

Watch the shutter speed: your focal length x 1.6 (crop factor) x 2 (or even 3) - added for the helicopter. For example for 250 mm you need: 250 x 1.6 x 2 = 800 - that is 1/800 shutter speed Most probably you'll have sun. Hence a good Circular Polarizer will help you. I'd recommend Marumi as a best price/performance ratio. I have them and I'm very pleased. ...


1

My advice: aim for short shutter speed. (considering the vibrations of the helicopter and possible high focal length)


5

There are actually two common types of "little planet" images: polar and stereographic. The ones asked about in this question are both. The one asked about in the linked "duplicate" post, How to do 360 polar pano in photography? is a stereographic "little sky". They have different requirements and techniques, but both typically begin with a stitched panorama ...


1

If you're talking about minimizing parallax so that you get a clean stitch, there are a lot of tricks you can use like a hotshoe bubble level and a plumb line (aka Philopod) to make sure you rotate around the lens's no-parallax point that don't require a tripod and panohead. However, distortion is another matter. Depending on how wide a field of view you're ...


2

The easiest way to compose it in photoshop is by photographing the lens and flash on a contrasting background (e.g. bright green) and then use the mirror shot as a background. You can clearly see this is photoshopped because there is no reflection of the lenses in the mirror. There is also a depth error on the flash (it looks like it's behind the guy's ...


2

The lenses are most likely hanging from black cotton thread. That would be easy to edit out, if it was even visible at all. In particular, the lens on the left is at about the right angle for being suspended by a loop of thread around its top end; the one on the right looks like it would need two strings to support it. However, having now read Hugo's answer ...


3

It is photoshopped or gimped or whatever. On the lenses you see color fringes which probably come from working with slightly inaccurate masks on the composing.


7

Photoshop has certainly been used somewhere along the line. Either the 'floating' lenses and flashgun were photographed separately in the same lighting conditions and then composited into the main shot, or the photographer used string or fishing line to suspend them somehow and then Photoshopped it out.


0

Make sure you're tilting in pitch around the NPP point as well as rotating in yaw around it. You may have one arm calibrated correctly, but not the other on your panohead. Having a separate piece of software, like Pano2VR, that can map your equirectangular to cube faces, so that you can then patch a specific face can also be helpful, if the head was over a ...


1

On the last photkina I listened to a pro photographer who told about the role of smartphone cameras in a professional environment. He had a job the other day for a local non commercial soccer club with limited budget to photograph each individual player for their website and other usages. In order to keep the cost low he found a way of getting rid of the ...


1

In addition to what others have said, my only note is that bright direct sunlight will create very sharp contrasts and is likely to create some overexposed areas. Either avoid direct sunlight in the composition, or carry a big sheet of cheesecloth or other similar material that can be used as a screen to diffuse the light.


3

The following goal is assumed: You are not for artwork but for reliable, repeating results on which the employees are easily recognised and don't look too bad. Any modern SLR does this and practically any lens does. Even any compact camera would do. I'd go for a canon 1200D or similar and a 50mm 1.8 lens (or the 40mm pancake). Go for a fixed focus ...


0

A Nikon D5100 with the kit 18-105 lens should be sufficient, just use it at the 105 end. Use a simple flash and a flash umbrella for diffuse lighting. If you have a more money, have two light sources. Use a tripod for the camera, use a remote control to avoid accidental moving of the camera. Make or buy a simple backdrop. Make a mark for flash, tripod and ...


1

Apart from everything that's already been said, there's an older art form called "painting" that can help a lot to learn about photography. It's completely different, yet humans have been painting sinceā€¦ well, it's been a couple thousand years, and for the last 5 ~ 6 centuries some really bright people have spent their lifetimes experimenting with light, ...


7

Yes, you can change the relationship of the shift mechanism to the mount flange so that you can apply shift vertically when shooting in the portrait orientation. This is pretty much a design feature with most tilt/shift lenses designed for use on SLR type cameras. Where your lens, along with the TS-E 17mm f/4 L, expands the capability of other T/S lenses is ...


0

The differences are - roughly in this order: Light Posing and mimic Lens (as for the brilliance) The model Editing/Finishing Fashion Background This list is probably not complete. :-) So there is a whole bunch of skills plus some equipment, that an excellent photographer needs to master.


5

Others have already pointed out lighting and some things to do in post processing. Those are important and the primary issue here, but I want to point out something else, which is framing. Think of the whole frame, and how your subject relates to the whole frame. And always remember that you can rotate the camera. Every picture, ask yourself whether what ...


1

It is both the lighting and the lens. The picture you are taking is has a background brighter than the subject and that will always make the subject look subdued. You can compensate for this either by altering the position of the subject so that the lighting is better or using a powerful enough Speedlight to act as a fill. Additionally, the first photo is ...


2

Right off the bat I can see that there's a difference in the direction of light. Your model is in shadow while the man is being lit from the side. You have soft lighting which is usually preferred for women and the old man has a harsher light which can emphasize the oldness of his age (typically not desirable for women). The old man is probably ...


4

Mainly things are different, here's a few big ones: Lighting is a big one. Your picture has even, flat lighting. The other picture has strong directional lighting which adds texture to the face. You probably would not want to shoot your girlfriend with that kind of lighting. Sharpness - both in lens and probably post processing. The other picture is ...



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