Paris

by Jon

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122

Not an odd question at all. As a large man myself, I constantly find myself on the lookout for ways in my portrait business to help people look their best (no particular order... just as they came to mind): No broad lighting. This is a 'basic' for portrait lighting, but I'm always amazed when I see inexperienced photographers who simply throw light all ...


71

[This answer is a community wiki. Please contribute any other interesting and relevant articles or examples to list at the bottom.] In a slightly different vein to answers so far: don't approach people first, just shoot them. This is mostly for practical reasons; you don't get good street photography by asking permission first (though you will get some ...


68

While there may not be a "right" answer to this question, there are "correct" answers. A histogram is a powerful tool, and when you understand how to use it effectively, it can greatly help your photography. As you mentioned, a histogram is a representation of tonal range and distribution in a photo. The basic mechanics are as such: A histogram represents ...


61

If you want them to stand out against the background, you need to use a flash. On-axis will generally reflect the most light off the snowflakes to the camera and have them stand out more. I used a cheap eBay plastic cover with a space for the flash for the picture below. Otherwise, a fast shutter speed may make them visible, but it depends on the background ...


59

No amount of processing can add detail that isn't there to begin with. If you greatly overexpose your picture, you cannot rescue the highlight detail lost. The same with significantly underexposing your picture. Additionally, attempting to fix some perspective problems will make the picture look unnatural and sometimes even cartoonish. Getting it right ...


51

One of my professors years ago came from a photojournalism background and really drilled the 'both eyes open' ethos into our heads... and when I say drilled, I mean he would have us doing literal drills in order to get our minds around the idea and eliminate the 'bad habit' of closing one eye as soon as we put the viewfinder to our eye. What he had us do ...


50

In the daylight focus on a very, very far away object, like a radio tower. Mark your focusing ring with a bit of tape or something, and you have your infinity setting. For closer focusing in the dark carry a laser pointer. Tape it to the camera or tripod so it points at your subject. The red dot should be easily seen through the viewfinder, and it will ...


47

If you just want bokeh for bokeh's sake then you can achieve this with pretty much any lens and any type of camera, even a tiny sensor compact, by focusing extremely close. Depth of field diminishes very quickly with focus distance, so much so that it becomes a major problem with macro photography getting a non blurred background (or subject!) However this ...


42

Thanks for all the feedback. Mixing and matching what other answers that were given, I got this. Mixing it all together a bit, here is a very very quick snapshop of what I'm going to do. Please note that I did this in 5 min, didn't take out all the gear...and only did the neck part for demonstration. STEP 1: Take a simple picture picture of your item on ...


34

The Black Card Technique is a workaround for the problem of the limited dynamic range of digital cameras. The dynamic range of a camera describes the difference in light levels it can record. The limits of dynamic range are often seen in landscape photography - you will often see photos where the sky is nicely exposed, but the ground is underexposed, or ...


31

There are a couple things you need to get great super-close macro shots of insects. The first, and supremely most important, is patience. You are going to fail to get the shot FAR more than you will succeed when trying to get 1:1 or better insect macros. Over time, two things will happen: As you hang around a location, insects will become adjusted to you, ...


31

As others have stated the main options are fill flash or multi exposure. I thought I'd post this handy example I shot recently where I tried both techniques: This is the result of using fill flash: The flash was off camera and to the left, near the ground. I was intentionally trying to get a very dramatic lighting effect, had I used the flash on camera ...


31

Firstly, you should pose your model. There are ways to accentuate parts of the body naturally. Try posing her arms so that they squeeze the bosom. Another option then is to break all the rules of portrait photography, and instead of using a long lens (that flattens features) use a wider angle (around 24-35mm on full frame maybe) and get closer! By getting ...


30

You've pretty much answered your own question there (except that you don't absolutely need a long exposure, it depends on the situation). The key ingredient is obviously the particulates in the air to reflect the light, but in the shot you've posted also the extreme exposure difference between the incoming sun and ambient light. The greater the difference, ...


30

Film negatives are only light-sensitive while in the camera, until they are removed and processed. The processing includes a step to "fix" the image so that the negatives will not be further exposed by light. So once processed, film negatives (and slides) can be handled in daylight.


29

So, a couple of additional thoughts (from Jay's post) I would have on this would be: Shoot from above, even moderately so. This will tend to minimize certain features (especially under the chin, etc.). Arrange legs and arms to "screen" a little. Consider, for example, a portrait where the subject is on the ground, you could have one leg pulled up and an ...


28

Barring the egotistical types who need to feel macho because they are purist "Do it in camera" types, there is a lot of value in crafting your photographs with just your own two hands, a camera, and possibly some filtration. For one, there is the aesthetic appeal to manually working a scene, carefully preparing your camera, and composing as idealistically as ...


27

You don't need long exposure at all. What you need is: smoke, dust or droplets of water in the air for the "air to shine" rays of light that are significantly brigter than the surroundings to make it visible against the background (dark background really helps here) I have an example of this in church, but if there's strong interest I can try to ...


25

We've moved into (in my opinion) a more philosophical question with art and photography. To answer this, you need to figure out what is your definition of "good photographic vision?" How do you measure the artistic value of a photograph? To me, that is a very subjective question; much like judging any type of art is. I have had the luxury of visiting many ...


25

Taking the pictures Use a joss stick: there's plenty of smoke and it lasts a while. When the room gets smokey, open the windows to get rid of the smoke, which will increase contrast in your pictures. I use a telephoto; it minimises the size of the backdrop needed. Make sure the backdrop is black. Use a flash camera left or right, and use a snoot to ensure ...


25

Yes, this can work. I know because I've taken photos of children lit only by their birthday-cake candles and they've come out nicely. First, some general tips, without regard to your specific camera. These are probably most appropriate for a DSLR or other advanced camera which gives a lot of photographer control: Use manual exposure. The camera's ...


24

Here is how I usually approach the subject: I attach a remote cable release to the camera and set the camera to manual mode, and make a first guess on exposure (for instance 15 sec, f/11, ISO 100 or 200). Then I shoot a test frame and check the resulting image. I aim to make an exposure where the landscape looks like I want it to look in the lightning ...


24

Many suggested answers so far assume that you can see something through the viewfinder or the focal point is close enough to use a focusing aid. While all great suggestions for low light focusing, I think you're dealing with no light focusing. I spend a lot of time photographing similar situations where there is just no light in the viewfinder at all. ...


23

Matrix is Nikon's multi-segment system. Other companies call their versions Evaluative or something similar. It is the mode you use when you don't want to think about metering. It is very sophisticated and does a good job in most situations. Spot is used when you KNOW what part of the scene is going to be your midtone, that is the part of the scene that you ...


23

Using weather sealed camera bodies and lenses helps, but each condition has its own issues. Rain: in light rain you can probably get away without doing anything special, but in heavy rain, you'll need to wrap your camera in a plastic bag with an opening for the lens. Dry it off well with a towel when you get inside. Heat: Two separate issues... static and ...


23

Generally speaking, you've hit the nail on the head. How do you know what good sushi is? You go taste lots of sushi that is reported to be good! How do you know what good photography is? You go study and look at photography that is reported to be good (and that you enjoy)! If you're trying to photograph something without having a well defined sense ...


22

Keep the camera as cool as possible! High temperature increases the thermal noise in your images. That's why certain astrophotographers actively cool their camera!


22

Short of asking Peter Lik himself, or finding he posted the techniques online, I could only speculate on which techniques he actually did use. I am assuming he did post processing. Some possibilities include: Start with a good dark sky location. The Australian outback has a lot of that. Some places elsewhere are also good (at times). Use prime focus ...


21

You can reduce noise without lowering ISO by slightly overexposing your picture, especially if you shoot RAW. From the Expose (to the) Right article at Luminous Landscape: A 12 bit image is capable of recording 4,096 (2^12) discrete tonal values. One would think that therefore each F/Stop of the 5 stop range would be able to record some 850 ...


21

The key to a good hdr photo is to use the correct amount of processing for the feel you want to achieve. If your goal is to get the "hdr look", then you're probably doing it about right, because there should be a slightly "fake" feel. If you are only using hdr as a method to improve a photo, then just be careful and try to under-process it. If you can't ...



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