Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper

Lunch atop a (Springfield) skyscraper
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3

There are three issues with compatibility here. Mechanical and electronic Field of View Optical Quality Mechanical and electronic The EOS DSLR mounts should be mechanically compatible with those lenses as they have EOS mounts. However the mount electronics have developed over the years and it is possible, as another poster said, that they will not work ...


3

There is no way of knowing. You would have to try out the lens on a DSLR to be sure. Many of these older film era lenses from 3rd party manufacturers like Sigma and Tamron had compatibility issues with newer Canon DSLR's. Very often they would work fine wide open but as soon as you stopped down the lens aperture, the camera would lock up and produce an ...


3

The biggest differences between the two lenses can be seen at 200mm and f/2.8, but that is where many of us use a 70-200 f/2.8 the most. If you ever plan on using a 2x extender with your 70-200 f/2.8, the difference between the two lenses at 400mm are remarkable. In the end, everyone has to decide for themselves what the relationship is between "close ...


2

Depending on which Tamron lens you have there could be a switch on the left side of the lens itself to toggle between "AF" and "MF". Make sure it is still set to AF. There are various ways to change the focus mode of the camera itself, but that can vary with the button configuration. You'll need to go through the manual and check the settings in the menus ...


2

To quote from the 572D manual: Automatic Focusing (for Nikon/Minolta/Pentax AF SLR) When the camera is on the autofocus mode, the lens focuses automatically. Digging a little further, this thread confirms my suspicion that the Tamron lens doesn't have a built in focusing motor, but instead uses the screw drive motor which exists on higher-end ...


2

There is no "best body" for a given budget and to get a really good answer you have to provide a lot more information about your needs (what kind of photos are you planning to take, what other equipment do you have, do you have a camera body already etc.). Wedding and nightclubs are typical low light scenarios but you can use flash. Go and try some bodies ...


2

First off, Canon Auto Focus Micro Adjustment (AFMA) is based in the camera, not the lens. When a particular camera/lens combination is calibrated using AFMA, it is the camera that is adjusted. You have the option of telling the camera to use an adjustment for all lenses, or to use an adjustment only for the particular lens attached at the time you adjust it. ...


2

There is no difference. They are the same lens. You can't go by the photos and since Tamron currently only makes one version of this lens, it has to be the same. The version without the AF motor in the body is the A09N. Th version with the AF motor in the body is the A09NII. Tamron began making the 28-75mm with the AF motor in the body in 2008. All ...


1

The current Tamron Lenses have the AF motor built into the Lens. Out of the two models you link, you will notice that the $500 model lists as one with a built in AF motor and I believe that is what makes it different. A few years ago, Nikon decided to no longer have the AF motor built into all their cameras and instead, to incorporate it into the lens ...


1

The Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD Macro, though touted as a macro lens, is nowhere near a true macro lens. It has a maximum magnification of 0.25X or reproduction ratio of 1:4. With a 25mm extension tube you can increase the MM to about 0.4 or 1:2.5. Extension tubes are much more effective with shorter lenses than longer ones. A typical 35mm lens that has a ...


1

Yes it will. The D5500 does not have an autofocus (AF) motor in the body, so only lenses which have AF motors built-in will autofocus on that camera body. But the Tamron AF 70-300mm does have an AF motor, so it will autofocus on the D5500.


1

No, it cannot. Only the higher-end models can. This generally means an XD model introduced after 2006, the 50D and the 70D (and one assumes, XXD models after the 70D). The dRebels (XXXD and XXXXD models) have never had this feature in them.


1

I think that there is a general recommendation to use a teleconverter produced by the same manufaturer as the lens. It will probably have been designed to work with teles of the same brand. You should probably avoid Canon teleconverters, because they have physical dimensions that may be incompatible with the lens. As seen on this picture, the first ...


1

Try Calibrating the Diopter of Your Camera to see if that helps. Since having the Diopter not calibrated may make the lens look out of focus.


1

Without more details about what shooting modes and settings you have selected, your question doesn't give us very much to go on. The 70D is a highly configurable camera and with some combinations of settings selected the behavior you describe would be as expected. It is possible that via certain custom settings options the AF has been disabled with a half ...


1

Sharpness (measured by careful manual focusing in a lab environment) is important, but remember with a wedding lens AF consistency is equally important. Sharpness: The Tamron is a sharp lens, but it is not quite as sharp as the EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L II. From DxO Mark (click the Measurements tab, then sharpness and profiles and play around with various focal ...


1

I preordered a canon 5dsr but I was wondering if the lens Tamron SP AF Di VC USD 24 - 70 mm will be good with that camera? Summary: You are liable to be happy with this lens on most counts if you are happy with the 24-70 mm zoom range and f/2.8 constant aperture. According to DxO, you cannot get a sharper zoom in the 2X mm - 7Xmm f/2.8 class, although ...


1

Yes. Just make sure that you buy the Canon mount version for this lens, as third party lens makers generally also make versions with mounts for Nikon and other camera brands.


1

If it's low-light work you're primarily intending to do then the f2.8 lenses are a better option as they are an f-stop brighter than the Canon 24-105 f4L. Image stablisation can only do so much and having a wider aperture will give you a head start in low-light environments, making IS less necessary. Also bear in mind you're less likely to need IS at wider ...


1

Using a teleconverter on a a Rebel body with a slow zoom lens is not likely to work well, unfortunately. Autofocus will not work and image quality is going to be poor. You are much better off saving to buy a longer lens.


1

It seems like newer Tamrons have problems with the autofocus motor. My 70-200/f2.8 VC had the same symptoms and after a while it stopped focusing but was repaired through warranty. I hear similar stories about the new 24-70/f2.8 VC as well. First of all go back to your camera store and let them check it out and show you how it works. If there's a problem ...


1

Try cleaning the contacts on the lens mount and checking them for damage, it could be that the camera can't communicate with the lens. I have a Tamron 18-270 PZD which stops autofocusing occasionally, I have to wiggle the focus ring for it to start moving.


1

The Sony TCs are designed specifically for Sony G lenses and CANNOT be used with other lenses without risk of damaging both the lens and the TC - this is due to the extremely tight tolerance (about a mm gap) between the lens' rear glass and the TC's front glass. Likewise the new Sigma APO TCs are specifically tailored for a limited set of lenses such as the ...



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