Shadowy Daisy

Shadowy Daisy
by damned-truths

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6

Is there a reason why Canon and Nikon allow third party makers to make lens that provide similar specs to first-party lens such are AF, IS and aperture control when they sell for less? Controlling a product line that has the support of many third parties is much more profitable than trying to build and sell every product yourself. Canon and Nikon don't ...


4

Does this make the lens better than an L Lens? It all depends on what way you mean when you use the word "better": Sharper at common apertures and focal lengths? At the center of the frame or over the entire field of view? Less chromatic aberration at a particular focal length and aperture? Less light falloff at a particular focal length and aperture? ...


4

Neither of those lenses are really what most macro specialists would consider a macro lens. For a lens to be considered a true macro lens it should be able to project a life sized image of the subject onto the image sensor or film. If you're taking a picture of a 20mm long bug, a macro lens should be able to focus close enough to project an image of the bug ...


3

Keep in mind that the focus distance is measured from the sensor plane to the subject. The distance from the front of the lens to the subject is called the working distance. You might have two lenses with the same Minimum Focus Distance that have widely varying Working Distance. The Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro Lens (Tamron lens ID 272) has a working ...


3

There are three issues with compatibility here. Mechanical and electronic Field of View Optical Quality Mechanical and electronic The EOS DSLR mounts should be mechanically compatible with those lenses as they have EOS mounts. However the mount electronics have developed over the years and it is possible, as another poster said, that they will not work ...


3

There is no way of knowing. You would have to try out the lens on a DSLR to be sure. Many of these older film era lenses from 3rd party manufacturers like Sigma and Tamron had compatibility issues with newer Canon DSLR's. Very often they would work fine wide open but as soon as you stopped down the lens aperture, the camera would lock up and produce an ...


2

First off, Canon Auto Focus Micro Adjustment (AFMA) is based in the camera, not the lens. When a particular camera/lens combination is calibrated using AFMA, it is the camera that is adjusted. You have the option of telling the camera to use an adjustment for all lenses, or to use an adjustment only for the particular lens attached at the time you adjust it. ...


2

There is no difference. They are the same lens. You can't go by the photos and since Tamron currently only makes one version of this lens, it has to be the same. The version without the AF motor in the body is the A09N. Th version with the AF motor in the body is the A09NII. Tamron began making the 28-75mm with the AF motor in the body in 2008. All ...


2

To quote from the 572D manual: Automatic Focusing (for Nikon/Minolta/Pentax AF SLR) When the camera is on the autofocus mode, the lens focuses automatically. Digging a little further, this thread confirms my suspicion that the Tamron lens doesn't have a built in focusing motor, but instead uses the screw drive motor which exists on higher-end ...


2

Canon filed their patent on the EF mount in 1987, so it expired in 2007. Additionally, clean room reverse engineering to adapt to an interface is not protected by patent. Canikon could block sigma or related just with firmware updates They could, but this would also break compatibility with older Canon lenses. Many 3rd party lenses and adapters mimic ...


2

Don't know exactly how useful this might be but Roger Cicala's lensrentals blog has comparison teardowns of the Canon, Nikon, and Tamron 24-70/2.8 lenses with lots of pictures. Quoting the Tamron relevant text from that article: Front Group One thing that all 3 of these lenses have in common is a large front group at the end of an extending barrel. ...


2

Do you have "Auto Dx crop" enabled? If so, try disabling the "Auto DX crop" setting. Photo Shooting Menu > Image area > Choose image area > Auto DX crop. Change Auto DX crop to Off (if it's On). You can still manually change the sensor area between Full and DX, and even assign that setting to a quick menu setting so it is easier to access. As Mike Sowsun ...


1

You've already got the portrait lens you need: The 50mm f/1.8. On your APS-C camera it provides an angle of view the same as if you were using an 80mm lens on a full frame body. That angle of view also means you would be shooting at the same distances and getting the same perspective to get the same framing as if you were using an 80mm lens on a full frame ...


1

Do you want to say that aquarium limits the magnification? If it is the case you might want to prefer an objective with bigger focal length or the one which has more focus breathing (the rear focal length gets bigger at smaller focusing distances). And, from these two, the older 90mm Tamron seems to have more breathing. Review page, search in Google for ...


1

Allowing 3rd party components increases the acceptance and popularity of a system. As long as Canon, Nikon, etc. are confident and able to produce great(er) lenses for their own system, they can only win.


1

The current Tamron Lenses have the AF motor built into the Lens. Out of the two models you link, you will notice that the $500 model lists as one with a built in AF motor and I believe that is what makes it different. A few years ago, Nikon decided to no longer have the AF motor built into all their cameras and instead, to incorporate it into the lens ...


1

The Tamron 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD Macro, though touted as a macro lens, is nowhere near a true macro lens. It has a maximum magnification of 0.25X or reproduction ratio of 1:4. With a 25mm extension tube you can increase the MM to about 0.4 or 1:2.5. Extension tubes are much more effective with shorter lenses than longer ones. A typical 35mm lens that has a ...


1

Yes it will. The D5500 does not have an autofocus (AF) motor in the body, so only lenses which have AF motors built-in will autofocus on that camera body. But the Tamron AF 70-300mm does have an AF motor, so it will autofocus on the D5500.


1

No, it cannot. Only the higher-end models can. This generally means an XD model introduced after 2006, the 50D and the 70D (and one assumes, XXD models after the 70D). The dRebels (XXXD and XXXXD models) have never had this feature in them.


1

I think that there is a general recommendation to use a teleconverter produced by the same manufaturer as the lens. It will probably have been designed to work with teles of the same brand. You should probably avoid Canon teleconverters, because they have physical dimensions that may be incompatible with the lens. As seen on this picture, the first ...


1

Try Calibrating the Diopter of Your Camera to see if that helps. Since having the Diopter not calibrated may make the lens look out of focus.


1

Without more details about what shooting modes and settings you have selected, your question doesn't give us very much to go on. The 70D is a highly configurable camera and with some combinations of settings selected the behavior you describe would be as expected. It is possible that via certain custom settings options the AF has been disabled with a half ...



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