It's a bird

by Vian Esterhuizen

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20

Flash sync speed is the maximum shutter speed possible when using a flash. For most flashes, the flash sync speed, sometimes also referred to X-Sync speed due to the use of Xenon in the flash bulb itself, is around 1/200th to 1/250th of a second. When using flash, your maximum shutter speed is limited to the flash sync speed. In many cases, this is perfectly ...


19

You 'kill the ambient' when you set the flash(es) power high enough so that at the chosen aperture, shutter speed and ISO the contribution made by ambient light is insignificant to the picture. In other words, taking the picture in full darkness with flash only while all other variables are the same would give you the same result.


17

1/250 of a second is the maximum flash sync speed on Nikon D7000. This is the fastest shutter speed where sensor is fully exposed at a time. On faster shutter speeds, second shutter curtain starts moving before the first curtain has fully opened and there would be no moment where the flash could illuminate whole scene captured by sensor. This speed is ...


11

The limitation has to do with synchronizing the length of the exposure with the length of the flash burst. The flash does not go off immediately...it occurs a fraction of a moment after the shutter has opened, and the burst only lasts a fraction of the time the shutter is open. This is necessary to produce a proper exposure when using a full-powered flash ...


11

How to kill the ambient light "Killing the ambient light" is a term used when you want to take a picture that is purely lit by flash, so that you have complete control over the lighting in the picture you are taking. It follows, therefore, that if you were to take the image without the flashes enabled, the image would be very heavily/completely ...


11

To overpower the sun during the day you need either very high speed sync (i.e. with a leaf or electronic shutter), or tons of light and an ND filter. The theory is that the exposure from a flash is practically unaffected by the shutter speed, so by using a high shutter speed you let in the same amount of flash but much less ambient light, allowing your ...


11

You could use an ND filter or even a polarizing filter (which you probably already have) to give yourself another couple of stops.


11

Your camera is limiting your shutter speed to the 60D's maximum sync speed. If you were to use a faster shutter speed, you'd have black bars at the top and/or bottom of the frame, because the shutter curtains would be covering part of the sensor when the flash burst goes off. The only way to use a faster shutter speed than 1/250s with flash it to use ...


10

Firstly it's important to know why sync speed exists, basically when you use a shutter speed faster than the nominal "sync speed" the shutter starts to close at the bottom before it's fully open at the top. Thus at no single instant in time is the shutter fully open so if you fire a flash part of the image will be dark. For most DSLRs this speed is 1/250s. ...


10

In principle, your rationale is correct. However, there is no usable period during which an ordinary single flash is emitting at constant power. The power of a typical on-camera flash quickly increases from zero to its maximum value in about 0.1 ms (i.e. 1/10 000th s). Then it exponentially decreases with a half-life of roughly 1 ms; i.e., it decreases to ...


9

The shutter sync is limited simply by how fast the shutter can move in the same way there is a limit to how high a car engine can rev. Increasing these limits increases the demands placed on materials, design and longevity. Another limit is the distance the shutter must travel (which is determined by the size of the sensor, a full frame shutter has to ...


8

What does it mean? As Miguel says, it's overpowering the ambient light entirely. Indoors you can usually do this by increasing the shutter speed to the maximum sync speed of the camera (usually 1/200th or 1/250th). Increasing the shutter speed won't affect the flash exposure because it is so much shorter duration than the shutter speed. If that isn't ...


6

Short Answer: Probably not a Factor in Buying Decision definition: The sync speed is the fastest shutter speed you can use when using the flash. It depends mostly on the camera body. typical behaviour: Most flashes will sync with most cameras at around 1/250. Unless you have specialist requirements, they will all perform in a very similar way. Other ...


6

1/250 is not the shutter speed to use when flashing. It is simply the fastest shutter speed that can be used if you want the entire picture frame to be illuminated by a single flash from the speedlight. Google up "flash sync speed" and ye shall learn why this is so. Anyway, there is absolutely nothing to stop you from using flash at, say 1/50 second or 1/10 ...


5

The sync speed itself doesn't change, as that is defined by how quickly the shutter curtains move, but what is happening is the trigger is adding a delay, which throws off the timing. What ought to happen at 1/200s is that the first curtain reaches the top, the flash fires, then the second curtain starts closing immediately from the bottom. However due to ...


5

Sounds like you've gone through a variety of troubleshooting steps - if you can't discern any sort of pattern or consistency in the errant behavior, it might be a problem with the flash. If you have a friend with a Canon camera, see how the flash behaves on his unit - or perhaps bring it down to your favorite camera store and see if they'd let you test it ...


5

There are (at least) three separate kinds of answers to this. One is a special mode for the flash, in which it produces a flash (or series of flashes) that last long enough to provide coverage as the "slit" in the shutter moves across the focal plane. It's mostly related to the flash rather than the camera though. AFAIK, Minolta was the first to introduce ...


5

Great photo! This is a common difficulty that is even more of a problem when shooting outdoors. The simplest solutions, as outlined above, would be using a reflector rather than a flash (this could work really well as you have a big window) or using a sheet to reduce the incoming light from the window and either something similar over your flash, or moving ...


5

Yes. What you're envisioning is something that's actually used by some TTL-capable radio triggers to allow faster shutter speeds with manual flashes and studio strobes: it's called tail-sync (aka "HyperSync", "Supersync", etc.). The problem, as Loong has pointed out, is that the light/power output of the flash pulse is not even and constant during the ...


4

X-sync is the lowest shutter speed during which the shutter is entirely open at some time, and thus allows use of flash. (You don't want it to light just top half of frame.) X-sync differences don't play that much role in stopping action (flash pulse duration is around 1/1000 anyway), but rather in eliminating ambient (or overpowering sun, if you want) with ...


4

As you suggest the highest speed at which the shutter is at some point fully open will be faster than the quoted flash sync speed, to allow some variation in flash timing, probably just under a stop faster. I don't have any information for the D7000, but the Canon 1D mkIII has sync speed of 1/250s with most flashes. When a Canon EX flash is used the camera ...


4

First off, that's a really lovely photo :-) Secondly, did you need to use flash at all? Could you maybe just use a reflector to reflect the ambient light onto the baby? And if you did, you could consider bouncing it off the ceiling or wall to further reduce its power. Or instead of a white umbrella, you can get black ones too that would absorb more of the ...


4

Well. the max sync speed presupposes that the slave flash reacts instantly to the trigger. If it takes any amount of time at all for the slave to react, that is going to eat into your sync speed as the second curtain will have started to close before the slave flash actually fires. So I'd say that yes, you would be better off to back off some from max sync ...


4

You have a couple of options to cut down on the amount of light. An ND filter on the camera Add more diffusion to the existing lights Use a trigger with TTL capabilities - This one is only useful if the flash is what is causing your light to be too bright. If the natural light alone is too bright than you will have to take one of the first two options. ...


4

This is how Canon DSLRs work, in Av and Tv modes the camera exposes for the ambient light and only uses the flash for fill. To use the flash as the main light source you have to use full auto or P mode. or - the best options is to do what you did and use M mode, in manual mode with the built in flash or an external flash in TTL mode you can use the shutter ...


4

At 1/250, you are trying to exceed the x-sync speed of the 6D (which is 1/180, as you have found), which explains the black bar. Don't forget that on the 450D, as a crop-sensor camera, the shutter has less distance to travel, so doesn't need to move as fast to give the same exposure time, which explains why some full frame cameras have a slower x-sync speed ...


4

You see the curtain of your camera: nice, no? If you want to avoid that with mark III , use a shutter speed lower than 1/200s You could use high flash speed sync, but I am quite sure that your flash can't use that, so with this flash, your only solution will be under 1/200s or use a ND filter to have less light entering your lens Check this tutorial on ...


3

The D40 has the older version of iTTL, where ambient exposure and flash exposure are metered totally independently - no matter how well your flash lights up the room, the shutter speed is still set so that ambient light would be exposed correctly just as if there were no flash. Newer version of iTTL (starting from D3 and D300) will underexpose ambient when ...


3

Each camera with a mechanical shutter has a speed that is the fastest it is capable to sync with a flash. It is usually around 1/200 to 1/250 sec, but can be much faster or slower depending on the camera. At speeds faster than this the second curtain of the shutter begins to close before the first curtain is completely open. The sensor (or film) is not being ...


3

Not a direct answer, I know, but I think this should be pointed out : You rarely need flash sync speed higher than 1/250[s]. When using a flash, the action is frozen by the flash duration, much more than by your shutter speed. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule ...



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