Not Your Everyday Banana

by Bart Arondson

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30

You've pretty much answered your own question there (except that you don't absolutely need a long exposure, it depends on the situation). The key ingredient is obviously the particulates in the air to reflect the light, but in the shot you've posted also the extreme exposure difference between the incoming sun and ambient light. The greater the difference, ...


27

You don't need long exposure at all. What you need is: smoke, dust or droplets of water in the air for the "air to shine" rays of light that are significantly brigter than the surroundings to make it visible against the background (dark background really helps here) I have an example of this in church, but if there's strong interest I can try to ...


22

I see two options: You can stack ND filters. Sounds like you just need to eke out another stop or four, so your second filter doesn't have to be quite as extreme as the 9-stop filter you already have. By only having two filters, rather than 3, you should be able to reduce the vignetting a bit. It would help if your filters were the slim kind designed for ...


16

I think this is an example of: use the opportunities you have, rather than the ones you wish you had. The situation you describe is tricky, and it'll be difficult to get the kind of grand, well-lit landscape that you seen in magazines. But, as Kyle suggests, perhaps there are different interpretations of the scene that could work. Some specific suggestions ...


16

This is lens flare, where reflections within the lens end up showing on your photos. General guidance to minimise it includes: Avoid getting the sun in shot (and ideally, avoid having it just-out-of-frame too) Use a lens hood to shade the front element Try to use lenses that have anti-reflective coatings Keep the front element clean, but follow the lens ...


14

I would say at least for most practical purposes the answer is no. First of all, you only get intense heat where the light comes (at least close to) in focus, which does not happen inside the lens. Second, you only get heat when the light is absorbed -- but a typical lens transmits virtually all the light, which translates to absorbing essentially none of ...


12

No, you don't need a special filter for candles or most man madelightsources (in fact using a filter to shoot candles would likely result in a ghost reflection image due to the filter). For shooting the sun a neutral density filter is recommended to cut out most of the sun's light before it enters the lens to prevent damage. A candle is so many times ...


11

Bright daylight is often considered problematic for photography, as it causes harsh shadows. You'll get the best results by waiting for a softer light - a sunset/sunrise or clouds blocking the direct sunshine. If waiting is not an option, a polarizing filter is usually used to somewhat tame bright daylight, as in this example - Ground color on your photo ...


10

Time of day Underexposing Graduated ND filter HDR with tonemapping (I don't like overcooked HDR, but you can make it look very realistic, all depends on the settings). If there are foreground subjects, a strobe setup.


10

A lens hood won't do you much good if the light source is in the frame. In this case, the things to do are (a) use high-quality, well-coated lenses, designed for digital if you're doing that (i.e., the rear element is coated) and (b) minimize extra glass in the optical path - remove UV filters, etc.


10

The easiest is if you have the sun behind you, but not exactly behind you, but at an angle. That will give a slight side light to the faces, and they don't have to squint so much because of the sun. If you use a flash in daylight, it's mostly to push away shadows, so that is useful if you have the sun from the side or behind the subject. The direction isn't ...


10

I don't have an issue shooting images at any point during the day; I try to take advantages of the lighting and go from there. I would wholeheartedly say: SHOOT ANYTIME YOU CAN! Midday sun is overhead, and gives you dark (often called harsh shadows). On the plus side, mid-day sun is very bright and gives you plenty of opportunities for good exposures ...


10

How are you metering the photograph? There is no one aperture/shutter-speed/iso combo for any situation, you either need to get an accurate meter reading or 'guess'. When I say 'guess' I mean use the Sunny 16 rule which is: In daylight, the appropriate shutter speed at f16 is 1/ISO So if your ISO is 200 and your aperture is f16 then your shutter speed is ...


9

There are a number of techniques employed to get the look of the examples you posted. I think you're correct about the lighting, these pictures were taken with the optimal lighting for their location. The contrast was enhanced. This might be an automatic process as suggested by che, or it may be done by selecting areas of the image and enhancing the ...


8

Yes, it's mostly post-processing. The images have very high contrast, which also makes the colors more vivid. You can also increase the saturation to get more vivid colors without getting too high contrast. Your reflection on the lighting is probably correct; the images should have reasonably high contrast and color to start with, or they will look too ...


7

Street photography comes with a lot of constraints on equipment and methodology – no diffusers, no reflectors, no asking people to please move one way or the other – so the best advice is to concentrate on what you can control: where you shoot, and how you shoot. The environment Much of this boils down to know your city, or be ready to explore it. ...


7

Is your issue that your background is bright when compared to foreground (which is very dark)? If so, expose for the background and use a flash to fill light on the foreground.


7

For me, I have reflectors which can be positioned (sometimes with help) so as to fill in the light on the subjects. There are some reasonable 5-in-1 options out there, I have a 43" version of one of them and it works very well, folding up to a pretty small package and giving lots of options for cooling or warming the light as needed. If you don't have ...


6

In your shooting conditions the constraint is that a large aperture requires a very short shutter speed to expose the ambient light appropriately and you can't sync the flash faster than about 1/200 sec on the 30D. A strong ND filter might solve this problem. Alternatively, if your flash supports HSS, you can use that to reduce the exposure time (as little ...


6

As @Guffa said, but I've found a somewhat useful technique (if you have patient subjects, that is) for squint avoidance is this: have everyone close their eyes on the count of three, have them open their eyes take the shot on the count of three. Right when the eyes open, they will not be squinting. They will squint about a second later, though, and the ...


6

You may try solar filters. For instance Baader AstroSolar 3.8. D=3.8 so it's an ND-6310 filter (10^3.8=6310 approx), which is approximately 12.6 stops. I only used this filter for Sun photography, don't know if it's good for other purposes. It may have strange color artifacts.


6

Here are some options, I've personally had both huge successes and miserable failures with all of those techniques so you have to choose the one that fits the situation best: Find shade - A tree or a building that is just out of frame can do a very good job at preventing harsh sunlight (but you have to be careful not to blow up the background). Use some ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


5

Polarizers and neutral density filters will go a long way to help this, but they are not a panacea. At some point you will hit their limits and will need to consider an alternate time of day to really get the shot. That is, after all, the "secret" of photography: the right time at the right place.


5

One option would be to stack multiple ND filters together. The primary disadvantage to this (other than cost) is that as you stack the filters you'll increase the chance of vignetting.


5

Fill in flash is my preferred solution to this problem, as it allows me to shoot unencumbered holding onto extra bits of kit. Reflectors are great for portraits / couples, but I find them fiddly for larger groups, and when you need to move around. As John mentions, direct flash can be harsh, but a ringflash (or ringflash adaptor) makes the ideal fill in ...


5

Iceland is so far north that depending where you are in the country, you get significantly different results. Compare the following chart from gaisma.com for Reykjavík, which is in the south: With this chart, for Ísafjörður in the north: As you can see, between mid June and the beginning of July, the sun never actually sets in the north of Iceland, ...


5

As has been said this is the result of lens flare. Lens flare is caused by a point source light in the field of view of the camera. In this picture that source is the sun. But you can see this effect with other point sources such as a lamp, flashlight, or headlight. Another factor in the intensity of lens flare is the aperture. A small aperture (large f ...


4

You should be able to, but the controls (or lack thereof) on the s70 will make it a little difficult. The key to getting a good silhouette is to put your subject in front of a bright background, then expose for the background. The easiest way with your camera might be to set up your shot without the subject, half press the shutter, and then have your ...



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