Incense

by Bart Arondson

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38

It tells us that the aperture contains either three or six blades and that where these blades meet there is a corner which results in Fraunhofer diffraction. This is discussed mathematically in Physics SE. It also tells us that the lens was stopped down, as if it were wide open there would be no corners to cause diffraction, regardless of the number of ...


23

I would say it really depends on if you have a SLR, DSLR or P&S (Point-and-Shoot) - and maybe even possibly it more (or less) depends if the sensor is CCD or CMOS. My own experiences says it doesn't occur with P&S cameras - ever. I have 4 cheap P&S (Canon PowerShot) cameras which I have used exclusively over the years for shooting time-lapse ...


22

Taking direct photos of the sun can destroy your camera, not to mention your eyes. It's exactly as you are afraid, the lens will act as a magnifier and multiply the suns intensity right on your cameras internals. What this effects can vary. Long exposures against the sun can cause permanent damage to your camera's sensor, but besides that, your camera's ...


17

that purple haze is probably a color cast caused by the glass itself; the welders glass often isn't neutral color. you should be looking at solar filters, or very dark (and probably stacked) ND filters. Thousand Oaks sells solar filters, to name one company.


16

I think this is an example of: use the opportunities you have, rather than the ones you wish you had. The situation you describe is tricky, and it'll be difficult to get the kind of grand, well-lit landscape that you seen in magazines. But, as Kyle suggests, perhaps there are different interpretations of the scene that could work. Some specific suggestions ...


15

It's because that image is only capturing the visible spectrum. Most of the images you see of the sun are capturing the ultraviolet spectrum, where you see some really impressive explosions and coronal ejections: That image was taken from space with a highly specialised scientific camera, but you can capture some details, including prominences using a ...


14

The shape of the lens flare is related to the shape of the aperture while the characteristics of the flare as a whole have more to do with the elements used in the lens. The lens in that image would be using a six blade aperture.


10

Time of day Underexposing Graduated ND filter HDR with tonemapping (I don't like overcooked HDR, but you can make it look very realistic, all depends on the settings). If there are foreground subjects, a strobe setup.


9

That looks like a typical dust spot. How blurry the spot is depends on the distance between the filter in front of the sensor and the actual sensor (which is constant for each camera model), and the aperture used. For a smaller aperture (higher f-number) the spot gets sharper. The sensor cleaning function may remove some dust, but I read a test a while ...


9

If you don't have a solar filter, the standard way to protect yourself when viewing a solar eclipse is to project the image via a lens or even a pinhole onto a suitable background. Why not set up a rig in which you use, say, an old camera lens projecting the image onto matte paper in the back of a darkened box and photograph that image? Fred Espenak ...


9

If I understand what your asking, how to get the sun to produce a multi-pointed sunburst or star flare like that (Fraunhofer diffraction), its relatively simple: stop down your aperture to the point where it is no longer circular, but a polygonal. Using a fairly small aperture will produce a star flare around most light sources that are not too small. The ...


8

You can get all sorts of interesting shapes and colours when shooting directly into a lightsource like that. All pieces of glass reflect a certain amount of light and transmit a certain amount, so you actually get flare from everything in your scene every time you shoot, only it's usually much dimmer than the rest of the picture so you don't see it. When ...


8

This is just the diffused light going through the welder glass. It comes from two sources: the sky and the two welder glass. (These have coplanar surfaces that allows for bouncing the light for long.) You cannot do anything with those either. You need to use optical quality filters (ND filters of high value) to achieve this effect, although then you will ...


7

Yes, the sun can damage your sensor, as detailed in the previous answer. If it is that strong, compared to your sensor's sensitivity, you won't get a useful exposure in any case. If you do want to photograph the sun, you can use an ND400 filter. This is the one I use: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/155266-REG/Hoya_A77ND400_77_mm_Neutral_Density.html ...


7

The lens is using an aperture with six blades (or, theoretically, three - see comments); most probably six, since there are very few, if any, lenses with three aperture blades. The lens is stopped down, and the aperture blades aren't rounded (or not enough for this aperture setting). OR someone is using a star filter (though probably not, they are not very ...


6

The pixels are not overexposed in any channel, and applying a heavy curve will reveal the darker edges and some dark spots. What you have is an exposed-to-the-right image of how the sun looks like - it is a big shiny ball. IMHO you should have enough data in RAW to tweak this into a usable image.


6

Those pictures seems to be taken trough a telescope with an H-alpha filter. Most of them are converted to black and white. There is a whole website dedicated for solar photography: http://www.hydrogenalpha.com/ Here is some info about H-alpha filter: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-alpha To take similar pictures, you will need a telescope, F-mount to ...


6

Alan Friedman, the astronomer featured, gave a TEDx talk late last year where he spoke about his inspiration for making these pictures. (Here's the link for the video: http://youtu.be/LTtTfCwkIW0) In the video, he shows some of his gear. He has two telescopes he's using. One is a refractor that probably has a built-in Hydrogen Alpha filter in place for ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


5

Polarizers and neutral density filters will go a long way to help this, but they are not a panacea. At some point you will hit their limits and will need to consider an alternate time of day to really get the shot. That is, after all, the "secret" of photography: the right time at the right place.


5

You can try this: step down at max (eg. > f/22) take an off-focus blurry picture of some uniform surface (eg. ceiling or monochrome wall). Best is when you can get rid of the subject grain itself, so look for slow exposures and manual out-of-focus! If the sensor is dusty you'll clearly notice spots. If you have scratches, you'll see them also. For your ...


5

If you take a quick photo of the sun, it is unlikely that you will damage the sensor - or the shutter, but you may blind yourself a bit (speaking from experience here). If you shoot a photo of the sun in LiveView, you can generate a lot of heat on the sensor from the lens focusing the sunlight. Having said that, I have pointed a compact camera into the sun ...


4

First and foremost, never, EVER look directly at the Sun through your viewfinder. EVER. Generally speaking, it is not a good idea to point your camera directly at the sun, whether you're looking through the viewfinder or not. This becomes more critical as your lens gets longer - a telephoto lens is essentially a telescope, so you'd be focussing all the ...


4

There's probably some post-processing (HDR) to get everything exposed correctly, but you can get the sun's rays without any post-processing. It's hardly the best example, but you can see some of the effect here, where (except for cropping and resizing) I haven't done any post-processing at all: You want a narrow aperture (though I only used f/4.5 for the ...


4

Hrm...it's weird that your sensor would be damaged with a mid-afternoon shots of the sun. Were you directly pointing to the sun? Were these long exposures of the sun? Were you using LiveView (on an SLR)? How big are the pink spots? When did you take the shots, and how long have you let the body rest before trying again? Perhaps try letting the body rest ...


4

You'll definitely want to get some type of Solar Filter, otherwise, since this is a partial eclipse, it could damage your eyes, camera, or telescope.


4

One really cool thing to do in a solar eclipse is look at the shadows cast from small dots, like the small gaps in leaves. Normally, they will be circle shaped, in an eclipse, they will look crescent shaped. Look for similar phenomena around you, and good luck! Oh, definitely get a solar filter of some kind, if you can, or it could damage your eyes and ...


4

WARNING: All care and no responsibility !!! This is YOUR eyes at stake - exercise due care. If smoke curls gently from the camera, odds are you have got it wrong. Be very aware that a camera optical system MAY focus the suns rays into a viewfinder - even if the main image is defocused. Don't be scared away by the potential risks - just be certain ...



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