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41

Shooting blurred photos can be considered opposite of black and white photography - while black and white is about hiding colors to bring out shapes and shadows, blurring helps to reveal colors by hiding shapes and shadows. An interesting subcategory is a combination of the opposites - black and white blurs - where distractions by both details and colors are ...


34

Lets break this down into sub-questions to make the answer more obvious: It is possible for someone NEVER to use the flash? Yes. Buy a DSLR without a built-in one and do not pay for an add-on flash, and voila! Can you make great photos without EVER using a flash? Yes. Just look at photos taken without a flash. My entire gallery has been taken without a ...


25

Yes it's perfectly possible to be a photographer, professional or otherwise, without ever using flash, just like you could be a professional photographer without ever using f/2.8. I would however consider someone a more well rounded photographer if they knew how to use flash, even more so if they also knew when to use flash! There are right an wrong ...


25

We've moved into (in my opinion) a more philosophical question with art and photography. To answer this, you need to figure out what is your definition of "good photographic vision?" How do you measure the artistic value of a photograph? To me, that is a very subjective question; much like judging any type of art is. I have had the luxury of visiting many ...


22

Forget holding the camera at an arms length if you also want the picture to be good. Everything will be distorted, and you will have a silly look in your face, probably also with strange lighting. If what you are aiming for is a picture of you in front of the famous landmarks, then I would simply ask a stranger. Try to look for one carrying a camera, as ...


16

Lighting Luckily you don't need to drag round a full set of Profotos and car batteries to get this look, natural light is all you need. Shoot late in the day when the sun is low in the sky. This gives you a softer light, with natural fill, warmer colours and makes it easier to blow out (overexpose) the background and/or provide lots of highlights for great ...


14

One way is to just set reasonably wide focal length, something around f/5.6, put the camera on nearest rock/bench/nice spot on the ground, and take a picture with a self-timer. It works even for groups:


13

One more suggestion: if the picture is meant to be a background for something else (like a computer desktop, a printed page or a work of art), then the "something else" forms the foreground of the resulting work, and the picture in the background should not excessively distract the viewer from it. Thus, a completely blurred or defocused picture may be ...


13

No, there are really no such rules. This is where having an eye for these things comes in, either through a natural ability or through practice (or both). It is subjective, but not arbitrary, and it's art but not a black art. Eventually, you'll develop a personal style for what feels right to you. Many photographers develop a very distinctive personal look. ...


12

I'm not nearly anywhere I'd like to be with my photography, but here are the things that have helped me on the way: Books, both educational and "picture books". On educational side I'd recommend "The Photographer's Eye" by Michael Freeman and Freeman Patterson's instructional books. I can now also recommend Michael Freeman's "The Photographer's Mind". ...


12

Most decisions are artistic ones, and depend on your own personal style and vision, and to some extent the genre of photography, whether it's landscape or portraits, commercial or non-commercial. Before you start, you need to have some idea of what you want your image to look like. High key or low key? Sharp and contrasty, or light and ethereal? Every ...


11

"full photographer experience" is the kicker here really. Can you do weddings? Apparently, because your friend does. Can you create a dramatically lit portrait in a fully lit, bright room against a bright walls without it...probably not. If you always have control over your environment and only want to do certain kinds of shots - then of course you ...


11

Here's what I see: The lighting is fairly soft, and warm. My hunch is that the photographer used diffused natural lighting (such as sunlight through a curtain). You could achieve the same with a diffused strobe (ex: through an umbrella) and gels or white-balance tweaking though. Whatever the light source, it's coming from camera right, somewhat behind the ...


10

I traveled to Washington D.C. for a few days on business by myself a few years ago. I toured the city alone to visit the sights and like you I wanted some images of myself in front of the famous landmarks. To achieve this I did a few things Mounted the camera on a tripod Used a wide angle lens to allow for cropping later When possible shot with a ...


10

There are a lot of categories, some more well known than others. There is no specified standard for categories, so it's just up to what people use. If you make a web search for a category, you will see approximately how well used it is. Stage photography for example is well known, but curtain photography is not used enough to even show up before a bunch of ...


10

That's a perfectly accepted and normal style of mounting a print - known as 'matting' a print. The border around just further draws your eye to the photo.


8

Guffa's answer is extremely complete, so I'll take a bit of a different tack. There are a few "major" and "minor" categories of photography that I think are pretty common, and regularly used in photographic jargon: General Journalism Street Still Life Nature Wildlife Bird Scapes Land Sea Sky Macro Nature Floral Insect General Objects Abstract ...


8

I'm a little surprised that nobody has mentioned a wireless remote. These are pretty common across the camera brands and use of them with a 2 (or greater) second timer gives you a chance to hide it before the picture is taken. Worth checking out if your Canon is a dSLR, I'm not sure if the same options exist in the point and shoot world. I've used them for ...


8

I once saw someone taking this kind of picture using a light monopod. He hand-held the monopod and used the camera's self-timer to get the shot. The camera was a Point and Shoot. He sometimes used street objects such as park benches, trash cans, cars, etc, to help reduce camera shake. The monopod was used just to avoid being so close to the camera, it was ...


7

Get a tripod, a wireless shutter release and a good pair of running shoes.


7

One thing to bear in mind that single biggest advantage of digital over film is the freedom to experiment. While, of course, you can experiment with film, the cost of developing the results of your experiments can be prohibitive and you have to wait to see if the experiment worked. For example, I started experimenting with water drop photography (not using ...


7

As long as he's not using flash for the right reasons, then it's completely fine. The wrong reasons sound like the following: I HATE using flash! It's soooo unnatural! This is a chronic illness among new (D)SLR owners, and it's just a ridiculous statement (especially with an entry-level camera). Technology can only get you so far, and then you help ...


7

For any noun X, adding "photography" after it gives you a potential category. Thus you can find all potential categories by taking a dictionary and filtering out any word that's not a noun. Some of those may in practice overlap of course, and some might be so obscure that noone practices them.


7

Cakes: IMO, for cakes the view point which makes them appetizing is including their side walls. This means that one should shoot from the cake's eye level. Side walls of the cake show its inner fillings and therefore makes it more pleasing to the eyes. In the case of cake, if one piece is chopped off and laid in the plate with the cake knife on the side ...


7

I'll add another possibility to @Imre's excellent list: full-image blur can give impressions of disconnectedness, loneliness, mental haze, etc. All of these are potential emotions that you wish to convey.


7

I've found a useful technique is to switch between the original and the edited version. By doing this even minor changes sometimes look drastic, which could work against you sometimes, but it's a perfect representation of just "how far" you've gone with the edits. You can see how true you're staying to the original photograph and how unnatural things start ...


7

Zoom Burst, or Zoom Blur are a couple of variations of names of the effect you're talking about. More info on how to achieve it here, here, or here.


6

They were probably shot close up with a bare on camera flash. The inverse square law is a wonderful thing - get your flash twice as close and it effectively becomes four times as bright. Four times closer and it's sixteen times as bright. Getting a black background is just a case of getting close enough so that the flash is so much brighter than the ambient ...


5

Photographer's Life in Graph (by Robert Benson) has been doing the rounds. It shows visually what you can expect as you develop as a photographer.



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