Mist

by Jakub

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7

When I did a studio photoshoot, part of what was included in the basic package was a large fan unit. I suspect that a leaf blower is giving too direct a jet of air that is mainly being attenuated by the model's face (hence unable to keep eyes open) and then little kinetic energy is transferred to her hair. The unit at the studio was a very large fan ...


4

Some ideas from others: Several people note the significant drying effect on the subject's eyes. A number suggest turning wind off except when actually taking photo. A suggestion that sounded good is to add a shield in the middle of the airstream (they used a plastic plate) to create a low velocity area for the eyes. A number of people suggest these - ...


3

Two reasons that jumps right out at me are size and weight. A 70-200 is pretty big, especially with a hood. To a new model, I bet it's downright intimidating. Hold that 70-200 for long, and you'll start to feel it in your hand and wrist, too. An 85mm easily solves both of those problems, assuming you want to shoot at 85.


3

Complementary to the other answer (by @b-shaw), which focusses on creating this effect in post processing, I'll try to explain how you can achieve this effect "in real life". Your camera captures light (fotons). So you need a light source (in your example at the right side, above the field of view of the camera) and something the light can reflect upon. ...


3

Paper can work. I've done a few shots with a roll of butcher's paper as the backdrop. As you note though, there are many different types of paper and some have a more pronounced texture than others. There are papers specifically designed for this - For example on Amazon Savage Seamless Background Paper, 53" wide x 12 yards, Super White, #1... and there is ...


2

My guess is that the studio lights overpowered the speedlight to the point it was barely contributing to the lighting. Next time turn off all the studio lights, place the speedlight with the gel, take test photos and adjust the camera settings until you get the effect you want (or maybe just a bit darker then you want), then turn on the studio lights and ...


2

Bring the model as far forward as you can to open up as much distance as possible between the model and the backdrop and to bring the light(s) in as close to the model as possible without getting it in shot. You then drop the level of the lighting to suit the closer positioning As light falls off in accordance with the inverse square law, you have the same ...


2

Like null said, you don't want a tripod. In a studio environment it's just in the way too much. What you want is a camera stand. A camera stand has a small base with wheels to move it easily and a vertical pole that a platform and/or arm hangs off of to which you can mount your camera. Takes up little space, is very maneuverable in the tight spaces of a ...


2

I don't think that you want to use a tripod at all. For easier work, you want to place the product on some kind of table. Adjusting a tripod to point the camera on something on the table can be hard. Even if the middle column of the arm can act as a boom and be adjusted at an angle. A tripod provides a sturdy base at the cost of the space for three legs, ...


1

Perhaps you could use this online calculator to calculate an appropriate lens in your situation. For example, using the calculator, I can see that (on a full-frame/35" sensor) you'll probably need a lens that has a 20" equivalent focal length or less: To get this result I popped 20 feet in the distance input, and guessed at around 20mm for the focal ...


1

Primes nearly always outperform zooms for distortion and sharpness at a given focal point as their construction is generally simpler with fewer optical elements in the light path. Zooms are, by nature, compromised as they have to be able to provide different focal lengths with as low distortion as possible, and this entails some fairly complex optical ...


1

I think the aproach will depend on several things, if the light is soft or harsh, if the overexposed ilumination is over all the scene or just a part of it. ND Filter If it is over all scene you can try using a ND filter. If you use a 4x ND filter you can reduce the exposure from f22 to f11 or with a 8x to f8. Probably a polarizer filter will do if you ...


1

In your case I would buy an entry-level DSLR body like a Nikon D3300 and a 50mm f1.8 prime lens. This lens is made for such scenarios and you can achieve very sharp and high quality images and you have enough money left to care about studio lightning :)


1

You are looking for something like this adapter, which will accept a Bowen's S type modifier mount and hold pretty much any speedlight. The mount in the octobox you linked to is the right type.


1

It is possible to get a speedlight to Bowens S mount adapter made by the manufacture of light modifier. Adorama's Glow line offers this option.


1

You may find something like this in your area, but it's not a "commodity" find. Your best bet might be to start with places serving artists -- coworking areas, workshops, "maker" spaces, etc. -- these are areas where other people are creating things, so they've very likely got the same problem you do. One of these areas might have a stage / cubby / etc. ...


1

Anything1 is available if you pay enough money. Contact a few local photographers (try "photographer [your location]" in your favourite search engine) and tell them what you're after - no need to worry about finding a studio or anything like that as they probably know more about what's available in your local area than you do. within reason.


1

I elect not to answer your question. Really, there are two questions: One in your title, "How do I setup my studio for shooting large rugs from the ceiling?" And the other, "Could you please suggest the best way for mounting the camera to the ceiling, ...". What you ideally want A flatbed scanner is what your ideal solution is. You have a planar surface ...


1

If the envelope of the bulb is glass or quartz and is not coated, near-pure alcohol and a lint-free cloth will do just fine. I use Eclipse and Pec Pads because I have them handy, but ethanol, methanol or isopropanol will work. Small bottles can be had from anyplace that supplies industrial chemicals. Avoid what you find on the shelves a drug stores, as ...


1

Another possibility is to have someone hold a large card, or panel, or box side, and wave it to create air flow. The problem with many sources like leaf blowers is that the air flow is too restricted. Waving a panel gives a broader air flow, and also allows you to control the power. Well, at least until your assistant's arms give out.



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