India Point Park

India Point Park
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3

I think the approach will depend on several things: if the light is soft or harsh, if the overexposed illumination is over the entire scene or just a part of it. ND Filter If the entire scene is lit then you can try using a ND filter. If you use a 4x ND filter you can reduce the exposure from f22 to f11 or with an 8x to f8. A polarizing filter will also ...


3

Two reasons that jumps right out at me are size and weight. A 70-200 is pretty big, especially with a hood. To a new model, I bet it's downright intimidating. Hold that 70-200 for long, and you'll start to feel it in your hand and wrist, too. An 85mm easily solves both of those problems, assuming you want to shoot at 85.


2

Primes nearly always outperform zooms for distortion and sharpness at a given focal point as their construction is generally simpler with fewer optical elements in the light path. Zooms are, by nature, compromised as they have to be able to provide different focal lengths with as low distortion as possible, and this entails some fairly complex optical ...


2

Yes, the Einstein E640 is a studio strobe or studio flash. They are really the same thing. Here is a link to the User Manual: Einstein E640 Flash Unit User manual


2

Like null said, you don't want a tripod. In a studio environment it's just in the way too much. What you want is a camera stand. A camera stand has a small base with wheels to move it easily and a vertical pole that a platform and/or arm hangs off of to which you can mount your camera. Takes up little space, is very maneuverable in the tight spaces of a ...


2

I don't think that you want to use a tripod at all. For easier work, you want to place the product on some kind of table. Adjusting a tripod to point the camera on something on the table can be hard. Even if the middle column of the arm can act as a boom and be adjusted at an angle. A tripod provides a sturdy base at the cost of the space for three legs, ...


1

Be sure there is enough time between frames for the exposure. For example, if shooting at the rate of one fps, a two second (or even a one second) exposure won't work. This may require increasing sensitivity (ISO) and/or using a lens with wide aperture. Depending on the sensor and its internal filter, a UV-blocking filter may be needed, as UV may be ...


1

Try using a digital camcorder that automatically adjusts exposure. Then speed up the video in post. Same effect as timelapse photography. Look into MagicLantern. If you shoot stills, shoot in RAW so you have ample dynamic range in post.


1

The answer depends on the purpose of the photos. As you've already discovered, each color has its own effect and quirks. Adequate lighting that does not create unwanted shadows is going to be essential with any kind of background, because those shadows will also manifest on subject. Background and lighting for passport or other document pictures is usually ...


1

I think you can do better. Adorama has a 300 w/s Flashpoint kit with two lights, stands, and umbrellas for less than $250. You could get two of these plus a set of wireless triggers for less than the cost of the Metz kit, and you would have a four light setup that would allow you a great deal more freedom. Search for SKU FPLFBF300K2 to see what I'm talking ...


1

The Metz is a starter studio set, but it might suit your needs very well. Other options in a similar price range are Elinchrom D-Lite, Impact (B&H Branded strobes), Dynalight (re-branded versions of RimeLight from Korea) and a host of others you can find at B&H and Adorama. Check their used equipment too. Sometimes you can score a great deal on a ...


1

I've done this from a lower height using a boom stand with an umbrella bracket and the appropriate stud mounted in the camera tripod socket. To reach 12 feet you would most likely need to place the boom on a large table or other platform. Best practices: lots (and lots) of sandbags and counterweights to keep things from tipping over, and tape down all your ...


1

Perhaps you could use this online calculator to calculate an appropriate lens in your situation. For example, using the calculator, I can see that (on a full-frame/35" sensor) you'll probably need a lens that has a 20" equivalent focal length or less: To get this result I popped 20 feet in the distance input, and guessed at around 20mm for the focal ...


1

At ISO 100, f/22, and 1/250 of a second, your light would have to be brighter than daylight. This is highly dubious. The first thing you should do is check that those numbers are correct. Setting your lights lower should be easy. Knowing what make/model of lights you have might be helpful. Its likely you do not have them at the minimum setting if they are ...


1

At that price range, and without any other specific instructions, it is almost certain that the students will be expected to have the kit lens (18-55mm or 18-[something slightly longer]) that often comes with a new crop-sensor (APS-C or DX) camera. Apart from the slightly inconvenient fact that Nikon users will have a slight advantage over Canon users in the ...


1

In your case I would buy an entry-level DSLR body like a Nikon D3300 and a 50mm f1.8 prime lens. This lens is made for such scenarios and you can achieve very sharp and high quality images and you have enough money left to care about studio lightning :)



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