Napioa - Wind Origins

Napioa - Wind Origins
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4

You don't need a dimmer bulb, you just need to disperse it properly so that it is more evenly distributed throughout the room. Rather than placing the bulb where it is shining directly on your monitor, place it in a fixture and bounce it off the neutrally colored walls and/or ceiling so the light is fairly uniform throughout the room. The standard (ISO norm ...


2

Yes, the Einstein E640 is a studio strobe or studio flash. They are really the same thing. Here is a link to the User Manual: Einstein E640 Flash Unit User manual


2

First of all the walls. Paint the walls in white. You can use a light neutral gray, but it could be not neutral, cool or warm, so you do not want that. Use the same temperature as your base monitor's one. Normally you will go for 6500K. You can use flourescent or led bulbs marked as 6500K. Or you can buy specialized lights like ...


2

While there are probably different approaches to this, in general, you probably want to avoid using a single, bright source. I prefer to have a couple of low power (10-20W) halogen sources in enclosures that completely block horizontal radiation of light, allowing it to flood onto the ceiling (and possibly also the floor). These don't have to be fancy ...


2

Like null said, you don't want a tripod. In a studio environment it's just in the way too much. What you want is a camera stand. A camera stand has a small base with wheels to move it easily and a vertical pole that a platform and/or arm hangs off of to which you can mount your camera. Takes up little space, is very maneuverable in the tight spaces of a ...


2

I don't think that you want to use a tripod at all. For easier work, you want to place the product on some kind of table. Adjusting a tripod to point the camera on something on the table can be hard. Even if the middle column of the arm can act as a boom and be adjusted at an angle. A tripod provides a sturdy base at the cost of the space for three legs, ...


1

At ISO 100, f/22, and 1/250 of a second, your light would have to be brighter than daylight. This is highly dubious. The first thing you should do is check that those numbers are correct. Setting your lights lower should be easy. Knowing what make/model of lights you have might be helpful. Its likely you do not have them at the minimum setting if they are ...


1

Be sure there is enough time between frames for the exposure. For example, if shooting at the rate of one fps, a two second (or even a one second) exposure won't work. This may require increasing sensitivity (ISO) and/or using a lens with wide aperture. Depending on the sensor and its internal filter, a UV-blocking filter may be needed, as UV may be ...


1

Try using a digital camcorder that automatically adjusts exposure. Then speed up the video in post. Same effect as timelapse photography. Look into MagicLantern. If you shoot stills, shoot in RAW so you have ample dynamic range in post.


1

The answer depends on the purpose of the photos. As you've already discovered, each color has its own effect and quirks. Adequate lighting that does not create unwanted shadows is going to be essential with any kind of background, because those shadows will also manifest on subject. Background and lighting for passport or other document pictures is usually ...


1

I think you can do better. Adorama has a 300 w/s Flashpoint kit with two lights, stands, and umbrellas for less than $250. You could get two of these plus a set of wireless triggers for less than the cost of the Metz kit, and you would have a four light setup that would allow you a great deal more freedom. Search for SKU FPLFBF300K2 to see what I'm talking ...


1

The Metz is a starter studio set, but it might suit your needs very well. Other options in a similar price range are Elinchrom D-Lite, Impact (B&H Branded strobes), Dynalight (re-branded versions of RimeLight from Korea) and a host of others you can find at B&H and Adorama. Check their used equipment too. Sometimes you can score a great deal on a ...


1

I've done this from a lower height using a boom stand with an umbrella bracket and the appropriate stud mounted in the camera tripod socket. To reach 12 feet you would most likely need to place the boom on a large table or other platform. Best practices: lots (and lots) of sandbags and counterweights to keep things from tipping over, and tape down all your ...


1

Perhaps you could use this online calculator to calculate an appropriate lens in your situation. For example, using the calculator, I can see that (on a full-frame/35" sensor) you'll probably need a lens that has a 20" equivalent focal length or less: To get this result I popped 20 feet in the distance input, and guessed at around 20mm for the focal ...



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