Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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2

When it comes to diffusers you should be looking to use the same sizes as you would for monolights. The flash tube of a monolight often isn't that much larger than the head of a speedlight and the size of the modifier is mainly what creates the effect. This is echoed by the soft mods section in Strobist blog's gear recommendations. Strobist blog is highly ...


4

The halo you describe is actually a reflection either from the background or from the rearmost umbrellas. (The silver lined ones in the picture). Remember that when light bounces off a surface it leaves the surface at the same angle that it came in. This almost rules out the umbrellas as being the culprit, as they are higher than the object, so light coming ...


3

A good reference for lighting is Light Science and Magic, I think you would find it highly informative. In this image the sides of the canister are getting blown out where you would actually like them to be a little darker so that there's a strong figure/ground differentiation. Try some black flags, just out of the cameras frame on either side of the ...


0

What I don't understand is how TTL and preflash work when there are 3 flashes firing at the same time. The answer may be somewhat dependent on the system that you're using. In Canon's system, and probably others, each flash group emits a separate preflash. The camera can then determine power levels for each group based on the total light needed for ...


0

Since all flashes fire at the same time (triggered by a pre-flash or radio signal) the camera does the exact same exposure check it does without flash. TTL means through the lens, so it just looks at how much light hits the sensor. There are different exposure measurements, like e. g. "global metering" (as I'll simply call it), which uses complicated ...


1

While the specifics are somewhat brand-dependent, this question has essentially been answered already in one of your follow-up questions. Start with the following assumptions: There is no magic involved; everything that happens will be as simple as it possibly can be and still work; The system is not and cannot be foolproof; any sufficiently advanced fool ...


10

Editing out the eyes removes a metric tonne of information that might have been helpful in answering your question — please don't do that if you're asking about studio lighting problems — but there is still something to be seen in the photos you have posted. Apart from the makeup and post-processing that have already been mentioned in the comments, it's ...


2

For multi-flash TTL setups, the photographer first puts the flashes in groups and then adjusts the power between those groups by setting up power ratios. (Say for example that Group A should have 4 times the power of Group B, or a 4:1 ratio.) Prior to the pre-flash, the master flash communicates these ratios and the overall power level to be used to the ...


0

In modern TTL systems, camera sends digital commands to flashes (by means of optical, radio or wired signalling). First, a preflash at minimum power before actual exposure is triggered and measured to calculate how many times the power of flashes should be increased in order to attain desired exposure. This power level is then communicated to slave flashes. ...



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