Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway

Nidelva river through Trondheim Norway
by Saaru Lindestokke                

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1

You can get some cheap flashes and use them as slaves. I believe flash like that costs around $70. Do not use light sources with different color temperatures (like flash plus IKEA lamp)


0

I feel you still need to provide more information, for example if the gecko is going to be on a flat background or a "natural" environment, some branches here and there. But In reality the gear you already have can do. 1) Use it on a big white board, or use a big softbox or umbrella on the top of the set. Use the second flash with another difuser as fill ...


1

If you want an even stronger effect, take two lights with directivity (not wide-angle flood) and place them well off to your right and left, aimed at the subject. What light doesn't hit the subject will travel out of frame, leaving the background dark. Sort of like "dark field" illumination in microscopy. This can produce strong highlights on the ...


1

1) A difuse light. You can see that this is so by the shadow. (My gess a 2x2 feet softbox) 2) A grid or a simply cone (or a box) of dark paper (snoot). You can see that is lighting very specific in front of the guy when he goes back. 3) Try putting it just over the guy and start moving it to the camera. 4) I have the feeling it is not too close to your ...


3

Put one light behind the subject pointing at the background. Light naturally becomes less intense, the further you are away from the light source. You can further manipulate the falloff with modifiers: speedlights often have a zoom feature to narrow or widen the cone of light produced. light modifiers for strobes can sometimes be moved back and forth in ...


0

Could it be due to Metamerism? Metamerism is a phonomenon that affects the rendering of some colours under certain circumstances. It is possible that the make-up that was used was not appropriate for photographic sessions. The effect can be observed when trying to photograph some kind of flowers such as the Morning Glory that looks pink but photographs ...


3

My first thought is that because you are lighting the glass from both the front and the rear, you need some shadow on the edges to add definition. Positioning some black card just out of shot to the rear sides of the should help. I've not tried lighting glass to display the embossing, but I suspect that shadow defining the edges will also show up to help ...


4

The shot you're trying to emulate has two light banks above & slightly to the front of the jars. There is a big white reflector card propped between the two light banks & just above the camera position. The jars are sitting on translucent white plexiglass that's lit strongly & directly from behind and possibly also from below. And this was all ...


8

Two things seem apparent to me looking at this setup. First, the position of the subject appears to be a little further from the camera than the lights. Before you fool with the position of any equipment which can take hours to do or : ( re-do, move the subject slightly to and fro. Once you get the optimal contrast in the edges, you could move your lighting ...


3

Without getting into the mathematics of the situation which is covered by others with graphs and equations, let me try to clarify the difference between these two different aspects of the lighting. Quantity and quality. The quantity or the amount of light is determined by how far the light travels. All other things being equal, the shorter the distance the ...


2

Assuming that the video you saw is this one, rewatch the near/far usage of the light, but pay attention to the line of the shadow on the model's face. Note that when the model is near the softbox, that the line is wider and blurrier, i.e., softer light. But when the model is farther away from the softbox, that line becomes smaller and more defined, i.e., ...


-2

Inverse square law is only about the intensity of the light. 2x more distant is 1/4 as bright. It is NOT AT ALL just about point sources, its about softboxes and umbrellas too, IF you ignore the fabric and measure the distance to the actual flash tube. There will of course be dumb arguments, but inverse square law is NOT measured from the fabric surface, ...


0

The law of the invers square is only truly valid for point light sources. For photo purposes we are taking about a bare light bulb following the law almost exactly. As soon as you place this lamp in a reflector or cover it with a diffuser, the resulting light fall-off does will not strictly follow this rule. The extreme would be search light that outputs ...


2

"Soft light" is a term used to refer to light that produces diffuse shadows father than distinct shadows. But that doesn't mean you can't have some areas that are very dark and other areas that are very bright when using soft light. It just means the transitions from the bright areas to the dark areas are more gradual and less distinct. The reason you want ...



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