Serene Life

by garik

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0

Use the histogram and test shots. That shows the contrast, from the horse's mouth. You might also test each strobe separately to see the effect on the image, to tune the effect you want as well as simply making sure everything is captured in the exposure. Use full manual mode on the camera, for repeatable results. Shoot a test target as well as your ...


-2

1, Broad 2. Short 3. Rembrandt 4. Side 5. Butterfly (or Paramount)


0

Depending on the dish shape and the diffuser material, it could conceivably make a perceptible difference if the light is used in very tight. "Beauty dish" refers to a whole host of different reflector styles, from the even parabolic Elinchrom to the step-sided Mola to a basic flat-bottomed, high-sided design that looks for all the world like a minimalist ...


2

When using regulable flashes or countinuous lamps, the lightmeter does not tell the photographer what aperture to use, instead it tells which aperture the current lighting is set up for. The photographer first decides what aperture to use, a suitable ISO and exposure time. The meter is then used to find a flash or lamp setting that is good for the aperture ...


0

With so much white space around that close to the scene you will never ever be able to control the light in the way you aim for. The white walls act like big but uncontrollable reflectors. So turn the small room into a black box and use some sort of black curtains or carton to darken the wall(s) and ceiling. The next thing your set would require is space, ...


0

The type of light you use has approximately zero effect (unless you're using the CFLs "naked" rather than in a reflector, which will necessarily increase spill). No matter what you use, you need to manage the task of putting light where you want light and not putting light where you don't want light. Both of the previous answers posted (by Pete and Matt ...


2

Yes, a flashmeter only gives aperture. The shutter speed on the camera merely has to be long enough to ensure the film or sensor are uncovered for the duration of the flash (1/50 sec for a Leica M3, 1/250 for modern SLRs and up to 1/500 for a leaf shutter) and doesn't affect the exposure, assuming ambient light is insignificant compared to the flash output, ...


4

You've only got the three variables to work with -- ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. When shooting in a studio environment, shutter speed doesn't really matter because you're relying upon the lights and their limitations, so you often need to work at 1/60 sec. You input your desired ISO into the light meter, and take a reading. The only variable left is the ...


4

When we talk about flash photography; this is because the shutter speed does not contribute to the exposure from the flash. A flash will output a burst which last maybe 1/1000s, so changing the shutter speed won't affect the exposure from the flash but form the other continuous light sources. And since the light meter used in the first video you linked ...


2

You would let the light meter choose the aperture if you did not care about that choice. That's the short answer. I think you are thinking about it correctly. You need to make a choice of the aperture for DOF reasons or perhaps you care more about a specific shutter speed to capture motion (or not) the way you want. But the light meter has to tell you ...



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