Butterfly

by Rodrigo

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3

There are two basic connectors you will generally find on light stands. First, a 3/8-16 UNC thread (that's 3/8", 16 threads per inch). This is, fortunately, basically standardized in all such gear. Second, a 5/8" stud, usually meant for clamping things to, or often attaching things via a socket with a screw on the side. Since this is less critical than ...


1

Don't think of the background light as just a background light. Play with it. If you double the distance you will diminish the fallout. You will need to double the output, and probably put a card so you don't spill light to your subject. But play with the light, cut a cardboard in diferent shapes. From diferent angles Put a difuse before the ...


1

While not exactly a softlight reflector as in the beauty dish, bounce lighting itself was first used in 1956 by Subrata Mitra, but in cinema. The technique itself was devised to overcome difficulties with exposure that were encountered while filming Aparajito, which is the second amongst the three films of the famous Apu Trilogy by Satyajit Ray. If there ...


4

I am not sure about who used the Beauty Dish for photography first, but the principle of evenly illumination via secondary reflection is accredited to danish mathematician Piet Hein, who constructed the R(a) - lamp in 1931 to alleviate the harsh direct light from the electric bulb in reading-situations. source: ...


4

The Cowboy studio trigger is a manual-only trigger. If you turn the transmitter over and look at the foot it only has a single pin--this is the "sync" or "fire!" signal pin, and is compatible across all brands of cameras/flashes (except for the older Sony gear that uses the proprietary Minolta hotshoe). However. The menu communication with a flash is done ...


0

The problem of your setup is not only a different colour temperature but also a different spectrum of LEDs and CFLs. These discontinuous spectra might also cause the noise you wanted to reduce. Some colours are suppressed and your video camera probably tries to compensate/boost them thus adding the noise. If you want better results, check prices of ...


1

For the differing light temps, use colored sheets ("gels") made for that purpose. I set up continuous lighting for photography years ago, since the primitive digital camera couldn't handle studio strobes, and my wife wanted to shoot food and cooking things: it's easier to get the light right if you can see it the way it will be, and move things around. For ...


3

In my humble opinion you indeed can start with 2 lights and octoboxes, but for a low key portrait. For a High Key I recomend at least 3 lights. In the example you are showing you can put a light above the subject and a reflector below him, and you can use the second one to light the background (that will make 2). But a third one will give you a lot of ...


4

There are two basic techniques in the photo you reference: First, it uses "clamshell" or "butterfly" lighting — see What is butterfly lighting, and when do I use it? for more. You can easily see this from the highlights in the model's pupils. The resolution is low enough that I can't tell if the fill light (from underneath) is a reflector or an actual ...



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