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80

Broad Lighting: Is when a subject is posed such that the main light is directed at the side of the face that is closest to the camera. Broad lighting can add weight to a thin face, but it does this by 'adding' roundness/thickness to the face, so it is not a good style of lighting to use with bigger subjects (or even 'normal' subjects with rounder faces. ...


62

What is Rembrandt Lighting? Rembrandt Lighting is one of the 5 basic lighting setups used in studio portrait photography. There are two things that make up Rembrandt Lighting… A light on one half the face, and a triangle of light on the shadowed side of the face (called a chiaroscuro, but only lighting nerds need to remember that… most of us just call it ...


36

One reason to use Rembrandt lighting is to contrast the subject lighting with the background to obtain a chiaroscuro effect (strong contrasts, shape defining light). The dark side of the face is defined in silhouette against a bright(er) background: Here two lights are used, one for the subject and one for the background. The background light is placed ...


28

What is Butterfly Lighting? Butterfly Lighting is one of the 5 basic lighting setups commonly used in studio portrait photography. It is also variously referred to as 'Clamshell Lighting,''Glamor Lighting' 'Beauty Lighting,' or 'Paramount Lighting.' At its most basic, Butterfly consists of a single light pointed directly at the subject straight on, and ...


21

When you say kicker, you assume that the light is placed at an angle behind the person, on the other side of the subject from where your key light is. It is usually placed out of the frame. A hair light can be a kicker, but it can also encompass the entire head, be placed directly behind your subject.


20

I'd usually use the term kicker to refer to any highly off axis light which strikes a glancing blow on the subject. This creates a highlight or gradient over a small area of the image in order to accent the area, define shape. I [over]use this type of light mostly in portraiture, where primarily it helps define the unlit side of the face. It also adds ...


20

Studio strobes: + More light means lower ISO, larger aperture etc. + Can freeze motion + Can overpower the ambient light meaning you can leave the room lights on to see what you're doing + Greater choice of flash units / accessories / lighting modifiers + Can be used with battery pack for location shoots - Have to be triggered somehow - Need to use a ...


19

The important thing is to use a bounce flash (indirect flash) to avoid reflections, which is what makes the most photos look so unprofessional and ugly. There are some good explanations and tutorial on how to use a bounce-flash correctly, which would be way too much here: Lighting tip - 4 ways to bounce a flash Homemade Bounce Flash instructions In ...


19

Mike Stimpson (balakov on Flickr) is an absolute maestro of Lego photography, and best of all he maintains a separate account - Balakov's Setups - where he shares his behind-the-scenes shots, showing his full lighting setup and more. Here are a couple of examples:


17

A 'cyclo wall,' also referred to in various combinations of 'infinity,' 'seamless,' 'cyc,' 'cyclo,' 'wall,' 'drop,' 'backdrop,' and 'background,' are all synonyms for the same thing: A backdrop which curves smoothly at the floor in order to eliminate the 'corner' where the wall meets the floor, thereby providing the illusion that the floor stretches on to ...


15

I'd put a hair light almost behind the model and a bit high and try to have it very focused so it wouldn't spill into the camera, using a grid or snoot. Something like this:


15

You, my friend, are in amazing luck, because there is a really awesome website dedicated to strobes (more specifically off-camera lighting). I highly, highly recommend checking out http://strobist.blogspot.com/ The Lighting 101 series is a great beginner guide to getting started with strobes. To better answer your question here, it would help to know your ...


15

Generally speaking, there are two schools of thought on lighting setups for groups. I'll cover what you're not talking about (for completeness) before I talk about your question directly... School #1 - Light Individuals This school of thought essentially says that even in a group portrait, every subject is treated as an individual, and is lit individually. ...


15

Optically, all this should do is reduce the output power of the flash. The filters on the sensor itself are going to make it so you only get the red green and blue on each pixel. This device would just absorb a bunch of the light that could reach the subject. For example, some of the light to bounce off a red part is going to reach a blue sensor and not ...


15

Put a white sheet between you and the trophy - some distance from the trophy, but basically "all around". Cut a rectangular hole in it that is about the size of the trophy. Use a long lens, and shoot the trophy through the hole. Now most of what is reflected will be "white sheet", with just a small hole in the middle where you were standing. If you further ...


13

It's the difference between your main light and fill light expressed as a ratio of brightness. Example: if your main light is twice as bright as your fill light, the ratio is 2:1. A high ratio will give a more contrasty effect, as shadows cast by the main light will still be dark. A lower ratio means the fill light lessens the effect of shadows cast by the ...


13

Here's a similar but not identical shot I did a while ago: The background is just a bare hotshoe flash pointing at a white wall, it's easiest to setup the background first, without the main lights: And then position the main lights, turning the background light off to check for interference from the main lights: As you can see the main lights do ...


13

Pros: Many small strobes and studio lights already have optical triggers built in, so you may already have them. Because optical triggers are often built in, this reduces the number of items you need to carry, as well as the number of interconnects. Fewer parts leaves less room for failure or error. Optical triggers are inexpensive if you do need to add or ...


13

What is Split Lighting? Split Lighting is one of the 5 basic lighting setups used in studio portrait photography. Split lighting at its most basic level is constructed with a single light source placed 90 degrees offset from the subject and a bit higher than eye level, lighting one half of the face, and leaving the other in shadow. The thing that ...


13

@Jay Lance's lighting diagrams are nice, but they're top-down. That's what you want for most lighting diagrams (and hence that's how most software works). However, for butterfly lighting, the key is to position the lights vertically, "on top of" each other... and so a side-shot of the lighting setup is more illustrative. This page on DIYPhotography has a ...


13

Studio strobes are actually much, much, EXTREMELY MUCH more powerful than any remotely sane continuous lighting setup (at lighting scenes for photography). This is because a strobe delivers its ridiculously high intensity light only for a ridiculously short time - usually shorter than your shutter speed. For example, the AlienBees B400 provides 7000 ...


12

In general you can pump more power through a pack and head system, they're also more versatile (lots of different setup options, you can mix and match). Monolights are lighter weight in total and more compact and so suitable for mobile shooting, they're cheaper and easier for beginners to use. This is a generalisation however, each system has it's own pros ...


12

There are some articles online specifically oriented towards taking photographs of LEGO creations. Indeed, the reflectivity of the plastic imposes some additional difficulties which you have to be aware of (especially black flat surfaces). Here are a few tutorials and other general articles: Three Stages to Better Photos of LEGO Creations LEGO photography ...


11

I believe the photos can be made this way: for the light on black (You don't necesarrily need to have black background to make it look black. This photo was taken in a normal room, I just put the lights on the sides and really close to the toys, so the main direction did not hit the wall, and the subject was so bright that the difference made the wall look ...


11

Due to our wonderful population on photo.stackexchange, the above answers are comprehensive and extremely useful. I just wanted to chime in with the historical/etymological perspective.(mostly because Rembrandt is my favorite artist) I just wanted to give a few striking examples of Rembrandt using this style in his paintings. Here you notice the single ...


11

Hard light (i.e. a single bare lightsource) from underneath. Look at any old black and white horror film and you'll see this technique used. Or for a more modern example of the [mis]use of this technique see Jill Greenberg's photos of John McCain: http://www.rachelhulin.com/blog/2008/09/pdn-on-jill-greenberg-the-atlantic-and-john-mccain.html


11

You could use an ND filter or even a polarizing filter (which you probably already have) to give yourself another couple of stops.


11

Editing out the eyes removes a metric tonne of information that might have been helpful in answering your question — please don't do that if you're asking about studio lighting problems — but there is still something to be seen in the photos you have posted. Apart from the makeup and post-processing that have already been mentioned in the comments, it's ...



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