Serene Life

by garik

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71

[This answer is a community wiki. Please contribute any other interesting and relevant articles or examples to list at the bottom.] In a slightly different vein to answers so far: don't approach people first, just shoot them. This is mostly for practical reasons; you don't get good street photography by asking permission first (though you will get some ...


44

Having used both lenses I'd say no it's not worth the upgrade. The f/1.4 version is two thirds of a stop faster, which means where you'd use ISO 800 before you'd theoretically be able to use ISO 500. That sounds good, however that's only in the centre of the frame, the corners get significantly darker wide open. I rarely use mine wide open so for me there's ...


33

Before I start pontificating, a disclaimer... My experience is necessarily US-centrc as that's where I live and work. Over the years these methods have worked equally well for me in large cities with jackboot-style authorities (LA, New York, etc.), as well as smaller cities (potentially where the authorities have less oversight and more willingness to shoot ...


23

You've identified your subject, the tricky part is expressing what you want to say to others in a single picture. What is it you want to say? In your example photo, everything is in focus, there is little contrast between the post and background, and everything has vertical lines. How is the viewer meant to know what parts of the photo are important? What ...


15

I think there are many small steps you can take, but it will depend on your personality how fast you move through each. One thing that helped me a lot was going to public events. During public events people are more inclined to be photographed, so that will help you break the ice. Try not to go to a G20 protest though :) Maybe Mardi Gras or something like ...


14

You light spontaneous portraits with available light. Sure, flashes, strobes, kinoflos, etc are great tools and really expand your visual vocabulary, but at the end of the day, nothing is as authentic and versatile as available light. Start observing light. Find a cool light source - be it a back lit outdoor ad, a store display, etc. Look at how it lights ...


13

I think the best thing you do is be honest, straight up and provide a way for them to verify and possibly receive the photo later on, watermarked, low-res or not. I've only actually done this once, but I explained precisely who I was, gave them my card and made sure to not include any identifying marks in the photo. I took a long exposure shot of a ...


12

He's using a full-frame camera with a 85mm lens on a number of those shots. So, in terms of APS-C (which yours is), a 50 or 55mm lens would give you a similar angle of view if you go the prime route, but I'm not sure if Canon makes a 55mm, though they have excellent 50mm lenses. If you go zoom, something like a Canon 24-70mm or 18-135mm would add some ...


12

You already span the range 18-250 mm with the lenses that you've already got. They are zoom lenses however and there is a big advantage with prime lenses - their fixed focal length can with some practice be known by heart. To know how the picture will turn out before even looking through the viewfinder is a huge advantage when already facing a situation ...


11

I don't have an issue shooting images at any point during the day; I try to take advantages of the lighting and go from there. I would wholeheartedly say: SHOOT ANYTIME YOU CAN! Midday sun is overhead, and gives you dark (often called harsh shadows). On the plus side, mid-day sun is very bright and gives you plenty of opportunities for good exposures ...


11

A lot of it depends on the ability to engage and develop a bit of rapport with casual conversation. Ask a person about what they're doing. Compliment them on something they're wearing. Ask them if they have email and offer to send them a copy of your photo


10

Based on the EXIF data, he tends to use a Canon EOS 5D Mark II with an EF85mm f/1.2L II USM. Since you have a cropped sensor, a 50mm will have similar framing. In order to get the tighter DOF and creamy bokeh you'll want the widest aperture you can get, so either: 50mm f/1.2 L 50mm f/1.4 Incidentally, there is another question comparing those two ...


10

First of all asking before taking a shot often ruins the natural scene you want to capture so don't do it. Best way I have found is to use a fairly long lens so you can take the shot from some distance (this is the reason many photo journalists use 70-200 lenses). You may be noticed but because your a good distance away the subject is rarely too affected by ...


10

Legal Disclaimer The following is for general information purposes only and should not be taken as legal advice for any particular situation. If you have a specific concern you should consult with an attorney familiar with the relevant issues in the jurisdiction in question. The question includes the following and the answer below should be considered with ...


10

This style of photography using an ultra wide angle lens clearly goes against the ethos of documentary photography since it presents the subject in a unrealistic way. forces you to get so close to people that you influence their posture or expression, thereby altering what you seek to observe. It is however, a perfectly valid form of artistic impression. ...


10

Start by going outside without your camera and just looking at things. But with a different look: try to pay attention to small details instead of all the rush. You can't do that while you're walking: you'll have to stop for a while, seat in some park, cafe, shopping. And stop looking at the general movement and begin to look/follow those details: a mother ...


9

Most street photographers will insist, loudly, that the technique and equipment are very much secondary to the vision and the results. They're quite correct, and it's important not to obsess. That said, from a very basic standpoint, there are some pretty simple constraints to most street work: People are probably moving. You don't have time for ...


9

At least as I see it, the big problem right now is that the background intrudes too much into the picture -- in fact, it almost looks like it's intended to be a picture of the building, and this ad just happened to be in the way. There are a number of possibilities for making the subject stand out more. First, I'd almost certainly cross the street so you're ...


9

Become a super spy photographer. It is a filter attachment that allows you to shoot around corners, or look like you are photographing somewhere else. Available from Photojojo. OR... I know it is hard approaching people, but if you are polite, 9/10 people would be okay with it. If they do have a problem with it, go to the next market stall. Having a ...


8

The idea of "Shooting from the hip" is to be inconspicuous, so as not to change the atmosphere. This allows you to capture the shot as you see it, without interfering with the mood. Manual focus, using a lens that has a distance scale. f/8 allows you to get a much greater depth of field, so even if your focus is slightly off, you should still have a good ...


8

Wide angle with plenty of DOF makes things easier. I like low shutter speeds, 1/15 to 1/60, in most cases as it adds some motion and energy to the shots. Depends on the subject matter. If you want sharp you obviously want a bit faster. You can hang the camera around your neck, but trigger it from a remote in your hand, no one would guess you were taking ...


8

I've just started doing a 100 Strangers project in order to improve my (non-existent) portrait skills. Basically you have to go up people you've never met before and ask to take their picture (you can see the results so far on my Flickr stream. My experience so far is that most people don't mind you asking. I asked about 15 people on Saturday and only one ...


8

When using B&W, you have decided that the colors are suppressing the subject and you want the viewer to concentrate on geometric's. But this is strictly decided by the photographer eye. A more detailed article about this subject can be found here


8

This is a legal question and the best answer is to consult with a lawyer. Even in the US, there is the potential that some states laws are slight variants of each other. The most known source of information on this is Bert P. Krages II who is an attorney and published a pamphlet about the photographers rights which you can obtain here and print yourself. ...


8

For me, street photography is often about taking my camera when I might otherwise not bother. It's kind of opportunistic, rather than premeditated. For that reason I would think the 40mm pancake would be the way to go. It keeps the physical size of the camera right down, and with a small front element (not sure if we're comparing to 50/1.4 or 50/1.8) it's ...


7

In my own opinion, this is a tricky question because : If you ask the person, you just change his mind set and the innocence of the picture is gone. If you take the picture, then ask the person, they can be mad at you to have taken such picture. Sadly, I think it's a case-by-case situation where you must figure out by yourself. But a good rule of thumb ...


7

ahockley is 100% right. Your ability to get those sorts of shots depends on your ability to engage people in conversation. I got this shot while chatting up a large group of people at a company picnic. Also, be prepared for people to say no sometimes (some people really don't like to be photographed). People who are having a good time tend to be more ...


7

There is no common setting that produces a good exposure. You need to practice, experiment and make sure you understand how these settings work together. Some general guidelines I've come across in the past might help you on your way: Photojournalists have a saying, "f/8 and be there", meaning that being on the scene is more important than worrying about ...


7

Street photography comes with a lot of constraints on equipment and methodology – no diffusers, no reflectors, no asking people to please move one way or the other – so the best advice is to concentrate on what you can control: where you shoot, and how you shoot. The environment Much of this boils down to know your city, or be ready to explore it. ...


7

I like Bendihossan's list, but especially during travel I might add "Is this exactly like all the other shots of seen of < insert event or place here > ?". Photography is art and uniqueness counts. If you're taking the picture the same way its been done a million times before and/or the same way you can walk up and see it - then it's probably not going ...



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