Open

by damned truths

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

42

DCIM is short for Digital Camera IMages and is part of the industry standard outlined by the Design rule for Camera File system. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera industry to insure interoperability from one brand to the next. From wikipedia: Design rule ...


38

Here's some of what I do: Throw out the worst first. Blurry, blown out, excessively dark/noisy. Back-of-somene's-head is usually included here too. Repeat the above rule a few times, raising the bar for "worst" so that it's relative to the new set. Try to eliminate duplicates. This is an especially big deal when shooting in burst mode. Take X pictures that ...


34

I don't know if this is a great system, but here's what I do: After the shoot/session is done I immediately sort through every frame I took looking for the 'keepers.' I do it this way because for me it is easier to choose to keep the great shots than it is to delete the borderline shots... That may just be me. :-) Next I sort through every frame I didn't ...


27

Depends on how much you value your shots. Last year my wife and I took a 5 month photographic trip and we took: 1 Laptop: We had Lightroom to download and do a basic selection every night (out of focus pictures don't need to take any disk space!). Photoshop to do some basic retouches if we wanted to publish them on Flickr, etc. And a large enough HD to ...


26

Photo backups are like backing up any other data, and so the same principles from computing apply: You want to have one active copy. This would be your memory card and/or computer hard drive when you're editing/organizing. You want to have one easy-to-access backup. This is so that you can get the safe copy in the event that you have a minor crash or ...


23

Storing images as TIFF files is very space inefficient compared with raw, as TIFF images store three colours per pixel (at 8 or 16 bits per colour component, 24 or 48 total) compared to raw which just has the monochrome sensor data at 12 or 14 bits per pixel total. This monochrome data is interpolated into colour by exploiting the RGB colour filters placed ...


19

Yes it is. Including the box when reselling items increases their perceived value. You will often see LNIB in listings which means Like New In Box. It tells you are a more careful owner. This is particularly important for cameras or bodies in the case DSLRs and SLDs which have lots of small pieces (cables, caps, manuals) and depreciate in value quickly. I ...


18

First of all my workflow is based on Lightroom, but I know other software allows you to work like this. I never delete anything on camera. Import everything into Lightroom, I prefer not to skip any images at the import stage, this also means everything gets copied to my archive. First pass, in loupe view, image at full screen, I use the flagging system to ...


18

I think, like you said, the canisters are made for protecting the film from external influences. The plastic casing of the capsules is not completely shut. Dust, small water drops and light might get inside without an extra casing.


18

I would suggest backing up three things: The original RAW files. Your RAW software's database of adjustments — usually, this is kept as lossless storage of what changes you made. High-quality (100%-quality JPEG or TIFF, depending on subject matter / detail) of developed images you've put a lot of work into. #1 keeps the originals. #2 lets you recreate ...


17

They're formatted with FAT16 or FAT32 (FAT32 is required for card sizes >2GB), and have a fairly specific (though simple) directory structure something like this: ROOT --- DCIM -+- ###ABCDE | +- ###ABCDE | ... ### is from 100-999, and need not be consecutive. ABCDE is free text. This structure ...


17

Not sure that a picture with incorrect histogram, excessively dark/noisy or blurred should be removed immediately. Sometimes I see that even defective picture looks good after time. For example (as for me): So I found the best method to select the best pictures: I just show the pictures to my wife.


16

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


16

not the answer you want, but I don't consider online backup to be cost effective yet. Costs are going down, but I find the annual cost is still more than it'd cost to buy a good firewire drive, copy the data, and store it in a drawer at a friend's house or some other offsite location. And think about this. How long will it take to archive 100Gb of data onto ...


15

That is normal. The camera doesn't know how many images there is left, as images take up different amount of space depending on how much detail they contain. So the camera displays a guesstimate based on the free space on the card and an average size for images taken with your current settings. If you take images with large areas of sky or other smooth ...


14

Delete the bad ones vs. Keep the good ones. Until some months ago I have always taken the usual approaches: Mark the ones which are not really good, delete them, and repeat this step multiple times. I found this was very time-consuming and at the end I still had a lot more pictures than I wanted to have. My new way is the opposite: Mark the images you want ...


14

There are quite a few different online backup options, such as Amazon S3, http://www.mozy.com, http://www.dropbox.com, http://www.carbonite.com... One of the better options given your information is an unlimited plan, these are getting harder to find, but Carbonite is one of the sites that does still offer this option.


13

Burning DVD is your best option and even if you use another means, you should still burn DVDs. The main advantages are: Burned DVDs have no value, they won't gets stollen by themselves. It is easy to replicate and distribute. Meaning you don't have to keep all copies in the same place. When I travel for photography I always burn everything twice. One ...


12

To expand on what Nate has suggested you have the following options: A dedicated server with RAID External USB device as a secondary storage medium. Network based NAS with RAID support External USB based drive caddy that you could then use like a tape backup system and also ensure HDD stored offsite incase of fire There is also some software that can ...


12

Delete is my friend and I use it frequently: Delete immediately in-camera if I know I missed a shot. Things like people entering the shot at the wrong moment, forgot the camera was in MF, etc. Delete anything that is not technically perfect: sharp, focused, well exposed, well framed, correct WB, level, etc as a first pass on the computer, using PMVIew Pro ...


12

Lightroom is the way to go. Download the trial and give it a try, though I do recommend reading a bit or watching a few videos first to get the most out of your trial. Lightroom will let you do whatever you wish on the file system side, and then offer flexibility beyond it. This is important, because this NAS won't be your last, and in fact, you may have ...


11

Fast internet access can be a problem in many remote locations (esp. Africa, Asia and South America). I'd suggest buying a bunch of 16 GB SD cards and copying each file on two cards. Then you keep one copy with you and send another home via mail.


11

If I'm feeling paranoid about backing up, I use a Nexto DI, which can backup a card directly to its own internal drive. It reads CF/SD/SDHC, doubles as a USB2/external SATA drive, and is much faster than most of the other similar products I could find. (There are a bunch of similar products available, but this one had the best reviews at the time, about 6 ...


11

There are several services available. Mozy Carbonite BackBlaze CrashPlan DropBox SugarSync There's a few reviews of these here: TechRadar Macworld It's worth also checking if your broadband upload speed is fast enough. Using this calculator, for a 512kbps upload speed 150Gb would take just over a month. Another check is that you don't get charged ...


10

I personally find remote, online storage to be the most "comforting". No chance of a fire, theft or power spike wiping out everything. For total security it seems impossible to beat Amazon's S3 storage since they write each chunk of data to multiple geographically separate data stores, read it back and do it again if they don't agree (then it rolls through ...


10

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


10

I've started generating a considerable amount of photography data myself. My main Lightroom library is well over 300 gigs, and there are also all of the backups. I tried out a couple Drobo RAID devices, which connect via USB (or possibly network, with an extra device.) The Drobo, while a simple to use device, is excessively slow. After some research, I came ...


10

If you've ever stood over a light table, not a light box, but a table that's 4'x4', covered with 35mm and medium format transparencies, you'd notice that some images jump out at you. Even with hundreds of shots in front of you, some grab your attention and others are invisible, even though, by themselves, they'd be great photos. That's why LightRoom, ...


8

It all depends on the risks that you're backing up against but one option you'd missed is the dedicated devices for backing up memory cards (Jobo and the like) - we had one of these circulating at our wedding, so that all the guests didn't have to worry about memory card space.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible