Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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43

I've had to preserve whiteboard scribbles a few times. The problem is that you usually can't control the lighting and it's rarely good. The technique I've converged on is to take two pictures. With the camera on a tripod, take the first picture of the board as is. Then erase the board and take the second picture with exactly the same settings. Now ...


16

Absolutely. This effect is achieved very simply with lighting. Most likely she had a light behind the towel as well as having sufficient light in front of the towel. By setting her exposure properly she guaranteed the background would end up pure white. This is a pretty common technique. You see it with a lot of model pictures on a white background. Those ...


12

What you seem to be missing here is having an idea of what would be a better picture. "Better/worse" is a strongly personal scale, so it cries for having your personal opinion mixed in. To solve that, look at photos of the same genre/subject that others have made. Searching by keyword on Google or Flickr should bring enough study material. If you like any ...


10

I regularly take photos of whiteboards sized 3' x 4' or larger with my cell phone camera to record meeting notes, and it produces passable results. The D90 should absolutely kick butt on this. The two factors you want to avoid are glare and motion blur. As Guffa mentioned, you want to avoid glare from ambient (room) lighting, so get into a position as ...


8

For some reason I can't see the image linked above. But anyways based on what I've read from few responses I assume the towel is pure white or blown out in the background. Here is a quick diagram to help you visualize: top view. All you need is two lights. Set up your main light first, get the exposure you like. Then add second light that is 1 or more ...


7

This might be possible to do by putting the flower on a transcluent table (like this one) and lighting it from below. The article even suggests it by saying "She backlit each flower with a (...) strobe (...)." Edit: I've tried to reproduce the effect. Having no flower petals, I resorted to a grape. Also, I have no transcluent table, so I taped a tissue to ...


6

Just some thoughts: assuming the average person does not own a translucent table, I'd cut just the flowers' heads from the rest of the plant (maybe these are just petals, which I deem highly probable) then arrange them on a piece of thin white styrofoam (or perspex covered with thin white paper) suspended on two boxes or book or whatever. A diffusing layer ...


6

Use Real Wine and Fake Couch If you can find a piece of fabric which matches your couch... Stain the fabric Take one of the cushions from the sofa Remove the cushion cover (often easier said than done) Put a plastic bag around the cusion Wrap the stained fabric round the cushion Place the cushion and shoot away ... just an idea


5

Your camera should definitely be able to capture the entire board without having to stitch images together, as long as you are using the highest resolution. You should use lighting that falls at an angle on the board. Make sure that you don't have a light behind you, that would reflect in the board. If you use the built-in flash, the reflection will of ...


4

I did shots of Autumn leaves which I placed on the floor near a doorway and used side lighting. There were harsh shadows, but it brought out the texture of the leaves. Front lighting will lose all that texture. If you find side lighting too harsh, then try a main light close and to one side, and the fill with another light further away, and either behind ...


4

I don't want to skirt the question, but I take photos of white boards frequently but using a different method then you suggested. I use my iPhone to take the photo using one of three different applications: Genius Scan App Built in Camera App Microsoft Photosynth App My favorite is the Genius scan app. It is designed for doing things like this, and has ...


3

You don't need anything fancy like polarizers to light your scene. To avoid glare you just need to place the lights so that there is no direct path from lightsource to camera by bouncing directly off your subject (i.e. the way a ball would bounce off). By lighting from a low angle glare will bounce off at a low angle and miss the camera. For simplicity ...


3

Things to try: This question about photographing canvas - as linked to in @Jukka Suomela's comment. The biggest light source you can find. This could involve using a light tent. There is an excellent book which covers this subject, called "Light, Science and Magic". It is avaiable from amazon.co.uk and amazon.com. This book gives you the tools to ...


2

Your camera has a Custom White-Balance mode which lets you measure white. An official white-balance card is best but in a case like this nice white-paper is good enough, as long as the paper looks white to your eyes. If you are using one of the presets, use the WB Fine-Tuning function to compensate for the additional cast. Your problem is not white-balance ...


2

There are two main "issues" here. One is white balance and one is exposure. It sounds like you have a pretty good plan of attack on the exposure front, you have a good grasp on shutter speed, apeture, and ISO. I think you are doing the right things here, the only two other things that would give you more flexibility and image quality would be using a ...


2

I shoot food photos with a macro lens. However I am usually a meter or more away from the food. So I am using the lens like a portrait lens. Many food photographers would probably use a 70-200mm lens - you can get a shallow depth of field, but not like true macro, where the lens is virtually touching your subject and the depth of field is a mm or two. If ...


2

No, you don't - well, not in the sense that you're asking. That wasn't the point of the comment. The comment was to indicate that the shot wasn't taken at 1:1 magnification (which is what a macro shot is) - because the objects in the picture are clearly larger than the camera sensor. You'd need dishes the size of thimbles. The comment was intended to ...


2

I believe, as some of you do, that this is primarily a "shot right" image. I don't believe there is a light behind the towel, because there is no highlight that suggests a light source other than the front light. It's not completely white. Really close, but not quite. This would not be sufficient for catalog work, but still makes a darn nice image. If the ...


2

I think you want simple, so I'd recommend using Program mode, which gives you the greatest control without making you learn about exposure. Program mode (the 'P' on the Auto-P-S-A-M dial) gives you these advantages: it sets exposure correctly for the lighting conditions, so you won't get a too-dark or too-light image, and you don't have to think about ...


2

You can also consider a light tent. This will help get a soft even light if that is what your are looking for. Since you brought up IKEA, IKEAHackers.net has info on cheap DIY light tents (There are a ton of these on the net, search for: DIY LightTent)


2

One way to eliminate the shadows is to use lights at an angle and keep the subject far from the background, so that any shadows fall outside the frame. Putting the lights at an angle will also reduce reflection of the light by the leaves (some leaves are shiny). Use a dark grey or black background and sufficiently shallow depth of field for an even, dark ...


2

I would suggest higher angle to start with, you can't see enough of the food. Secondly, use a warmer light source, such as an incandescent bulb. The lighting makes it seem to sterile. Finally, I would suggest having a cleaner background. There's too much going on. Good luck!


1

Sounds like you need some laboratory equipment. I bet you could find what you need here... (but this stuff is generally smaller than the stuff you linked, designed to be used on a table top - it is extremely versatile) http://www.grainger.com/category/laboratory-clamps-and-supports/lab-equipment/lab-supplies/ecatalog/N-ks0 You are talking about a pretty ...


1

It's not plagiarism if you give proper credit. If you see a still life, reconstruct and photograph it yourself, and then hand the resulting photo in to your photography instructor as your own work, or publish it in a book without properly attributing the original, that's plagiarism. If you're up front about the fact that you reproduced someone else's ...


1

Yes, it could be considered plagiarism, and a breach of copyrights. See this similar case. I'm not an expert on copyright matter, but AFAIK, whenever you get an idea, you have copyright for that idea. That doesn't mean that others can not come up with the same idea. So in the aforementioned case, the ruling part judged that the image was so similar, that ...


1

Let us see the food - low angle is often used in food photography - but not when this angle mostly shows the side of the plate and not the food - placing the peppers on a flat plate would have given us a better view. Style the food - maybe arranging the peppers of a plate so we can see their shape would have been better - or maybe arranging them in some ...



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