Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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I am not sure. I don't currently have lightroom at my disposal, but I think it has to do with the colour profile conversions, and color spaces. If an image is reduced to another color space it has less information, so the colors "wraps" to the lower color space model. Initial color space: Target color space: Here is for example a conversion (in PS) ...


-2

There is this script "Eg-Color vibrance" on http://registry.gimp.org/


0

HSL and RGB are 'color systems' maybe 'color models' not "color spaces". Lightroom does tricky things behind the scene. If I remember, computations are done in a "ProPhoto RGB" color space. But if I sort of understand why in HSL the lightness parameter needs to be modified with the Saturation parameter, I do not understand why the Hue changes


3

The camera sensor does not have a color space that allows going back and forth to XYZ since it does not have the same sensitivity curves as the human eye (Luther - Ives condition). The best that can be done is come up with a transform matrix that minimizes the sum of the errors in LAB for the set of standard colors (Gretab -Macbeth). I believe this process ...


1

You're right; the camera has its own native color space. When a camera is said to use or support sRGB (or Adobe RGB, as many also do), that means that it has native support for transforming its raw sensor data into that color space. When you use an out-of-camera RAW converter, like Lightroom or Darktable, that program needs to know about your individual ...



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