Road Train !!!!!!!!!!

by Russell McMahon

submit your photo


Hall of Fame
View past winners from this year

Please participate in Meta
and help us grow.

Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Some dust spots on the sensor will absolutely not shift with air-pressure (blowing) alone. To shift them you need to wet clean the sensor. I was nervous the first time I did this as I can understand most people would be. But it is not that difficult or risky, basically it involves wiping the sensor assembly with a soft rubber "wand" with a cleaning fluid ...


16

I'm willing to bet that that's dust on your sensor, not on the lens. If you stop down to f/22, that can help to confirm that assertion, one way or the other. My sensor dust would really show up at the smaller apertures. If they are indeed on the sensor (and they really look like the dust spots I got on my d70 and d200), you can try some of the Visible ...


13

Looks like there was some dust or watter droplets or whatever in the air and that they reflect the flash light. The effect is not very present but as your background is black you can see them. Furtehrmore as they are out of focus they appear as disc rather than dot (in fact you got nice bokeh)


13

These are probably the result of defective pixels on the image sensor, and are commonly referred to as "stuck", "dead", or "hot" pixels. This is a common occurrence with image sensors. There are several ways to deal with this problem: Replace the camera - this is probably the most expensive solution Replace the sensor - this may be as or more expensive ...


12

You're exactly right — it's the same thing as a monitor pixel error, but on your camera's sensor rather than on an LCD screen. * You can either fix it in post-processing (automatically, with many RAW-processing packages) or have it mapped out with the camera's firmware. If you're lucky, your camera model includes a built-in feature to do that yourself in ...


12

This looks to me like it might be dust spots or speckles on the lens, which are getting highlighted by the reflection of the flash back onto the surface of the lens. Obvious first step: try cleaning the lens with lens cleaning fluid / wipes. If this doesn't work, we might need more information. You mention this happens when using the flash with the Digital ...


11

It's either a dirty lens, or particulate in the air (moisture or dust). Image stabilization has nothing to do with this.


10

Another possibility is if you were using a filter, such as a UV filter, to take this shot, this can sometimes cause effects such as this when light sources are involved.


10

Those look like features of the glass windows that are being revealed by the polarizer. I don't think there is any way to avoid them other than by not using the polarizer, or being careful with the filter orientation and lighting. I've observed this effect many times in car windows. I can't find a technical explanation but I imagine it's to do with stresses ...


8

I think it would also be interesting to share some ideas on avoiding those spots. When the spots are in different places on each frame as it seems to be, it's dust in the air combined with a flash too close to lens. The strong light near the flash makes the particles visible and the closeness to lens front makes them very out-of-focus and therefore blurred ...


8

That really looks like sensor dust. Lots of it. The normal way to get rid of it is to use a purposefully designed cleaning solution and brush. Visible Dust makes the ones I use. You can try those, in case the cleaning you used was not good enough. The certain lighting conditions should not matter, only the aperture, because sensor dust is more visible at ...


7

Looks like lens flare to me. Odds are there's a similarly-shaped pattern of lights in front of the camera (possibly behind/above the subject since you noted backlighting) and what you're seeing is a result of those lights being bounced around inside the lens. update: Now that you've posted an updated photo, one can see the chandelier which is being ...


6

That sure looks like sensor dust, for which I'd recommend seeing the answers in the Best way to clean a DSLR sensor thread. The spot may appear "randomly" because it only appears when you're using a narrow aperture. That said, it seems you don't have a dSLR, thus no interchangeable lenses which are what usually causes the situation where dust can get ...


6

Spots like this are due to something on or very, very near the sensor. See Dust-like speck visible every few pictures — is it dust, or worse? for another example. Dust in or on the lens can't cause this problem, because, like lens scratches, they'll be so far out of focus that the effect is undetectable (in the same way a window screen becomes invisible when ...


5

These spots are clearly some point-like IR light sources out of focus (When I said sources it may also be some reflecting stuff). You may check that changing the f-number will change the size of the spots. You can see from the left part of the image that some of the spots are in front of the wood wall so they do not originate from the sky. One can conclude ...


4

That is definitely not from anything on or in the lens, it's from dust on the sensor. Or rather, dust on the filter in front of the sensor. If the dust was actually on the sensor itelf, it would always be sharp and only a few pixels big. As it's on the filter in front of the sensor, it's slightly out of focus, and appears as a blurred dot. Dust on the lens ...


4

Firstly, you should never 'clean' a lens with your finger! Try not to touch it at all if you can help it by using a rocket blower instead to expel dust and dirt flecks, but if you must physically touch it, use a non-scratch micro fibre lens cleaning cloth. These are quite cheap, available at any photographic retailer, and will not scratch your lens. That ...


3

It's definitely lens flare, from the chandelier in the upper right corner. If you're using a filter, take it off for shots into the light like this, or try to keep the actual light source outside of the frame (and use a lens hood to keep the light off your lens). You can also try a better filter. The cheap ones reflect a lot of light, and can make flare a ...


3

They look like stuck pixels, basically these sensor elements always output a high signal regardless of the incoming light. This is being incorrectly interpreted by the demosaicing algorithm resulting in purple spots. As a sensor defect there is no "fix" as such but you can map stuck pixels in software which prevents them from contributing to the final ...


3

Since they are always in the same place, this points to the presence of dust in the camera (and not in the lens). There are several questions on this site which explain how to clean the camera by yourself. Obviously, if you feel uncomfortable doing it, you can have it cleaned by a camera lab. To some degree it is possible to remove these speck via software, ...


3

This isn't terribly likely but I'm going to put it out there: It is possible that there's a light leak inside the camera. Light from the flash is getting through a crack and hitting the back of the lens and bouncing around in odd ways, causing the weird artifacts.


3

This effect is a very common one and is caused by dead or damaged pixels. Pixels may be "stuck on" and a single pixel producing a bright one colour dot or a small group of pixels In images they are often termed "hot pixels. Most sensors have some. They are a common consequence of aging. Some sensors will have them from new, some won't. LCD screens also ...


3

That's dust, not toast. :) Since you've tried liquid cleaning yourself, it's possible that that didn't work (in which case you could try a professional cleaning) something is under the filter that covers the sensor, which would be worse and probably require factory service. I'd try the first option first.


3

It's dust. As for the wet clean it doesn't always come out perfect the first time. There has literally been some shoots where afterwards I had to use about 5 swabs before the sensor was spotless. Note: Don't use a microfibre cloth to clean a sensor. They are not good enough for sensors. Buy a wet clean kit, follow the instructions on how to use the swabs ...


3

What do I do about bright spots in my Nikon D810 images? DPReview advise that <- Click me Nikon has announced a service advisory (in mid August 2014) for the Nikon D810, in response to reports of 'bright spots' at long shutter speeds and in 1.2X crop mode. According to an announcement on Nikon's website, affected cameras will be serviced free ...


2

I have similar issue with a Panasonic DMC-3D1K 3D camera. On 3D this is a big problem since the white spots are not identical on both left and right pictures. After some investigations, I have found that most of the compact camera with the flash very close to the lens present this issue. http://faq.fujifilm.com/digitalcamera/faq_detail.html?id=110200137


2

Taking pictures with compact cameras using built-in flash often results in such bright spots. They are usually caused by reflection of the flash off small particles in the air (dust, water droplets etc.) I don’t think stabililization has any effect on this. See also Orb (optics) on Wikipedia. It might also be caused by dirty lens or sensor, in which case, ...


2

This is most likely a Defective Pixel. There's not much you can do about it aside from cloning it out in Photoshop when it is obnoxious. Are you doing a lot of long exposures? Back when I was doing astrophotography I'd see a bunch of dead pixels in my camera, but never saw them in regular use. So it may be related to sensor time. You can always contact the ...


2

I agree with @ahockley, it seems to be due to lens flare, and definitely not to dirt. To avoid/reduce it you can use a lens hood, which reduces the chances of unwanted ray of lights entering the lens. This should be the lens hood made by Nikon for your lens.


2

One thing that was done before Lightroom 5 came out, was to create a strong z-shape in the curves. Here is an example with Darktable. Note the huge dust spot in the sky (to the right of the centre tree). Here is Scott Kelby doing it in Lightroom 4. The technique should be doable in Photoshop just the same. Update using dpollit's test image I used ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible