Alley in Pisa, Italy

by Lars Kotthoff

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38

Everything that applies to shooting a panorama applies to shooting one of these. A tripod makes assembling more convenient but means you can't pan to follow the action. It's important to rotate the camera and not move your feet in order to make sure the shots line up. Locking the focus is going to be necessary. Same with shutter/aperture. I've only done one ...


30

Any speed will give you something. It will render the photo differently. So, the question should not be how slow can I take the photo? but how slow do I want to take the photo? Some ideas: If you want to freeze the sweat flying off the boxer's face when he takes a hit, I suggest 1/2000s or faster. If you want to freeze the boxer's body and leave the ...


19

You're right — Hugin works very well for this. This is from a series of pictures I took with a P&S Fujifilm camera at the Children's Museum. It's not an action shot except in the sense that all pictures of children are action shots, but the process is pretty much the same. Photo by me. Licensed CC BY-SA 3.0 in this size. The images were all hand-held ...


15

I have about 10 years experience shooting pro-rodeo from inside the arena. The standard lens is a 70-200 f2.8 with high-speed focusing, either a Canon 70-200L f2.8 USM or the Nikon equivalent will be on 90% of the bodies. Rodeo action is extremely random and can change the distance to the camera very fast so having a fast focusing lens is essential. I ...


15

One aspect of this comparison that has not been mentioned is the fact that crop-sensor cameras are generally faster for a given price point. The 7D shoots at up to 8 Frames/Sec, the 5D manages 3.9 Frames/Sec The 1Ds III manages 5 Frames/Sec, while the 1D III/IV manages 10 Frames/Sec In sports photography, where continuous drive is often used, those extra ...


14

Sports in general means stopping the action. Kids are slower than pro athletes, but you still need a good range in shutter speed. With that in mind, IS/VR is no use because both technologies prevent camera shake at slower shutter speeds, and obviously slower shutter speeds does the exact opposite of stopping the action. However, IS/VR is nice for low-light, ...


13

Its almost certainly a strong strobe like you suggest and exposing for it will indeed darken the background. As far as looking strange on TV, unlikely. Its a blazing fast blink of light not targeted at the audience or the cameras but only at the court. Lightning as a light source is much more omni-directional. Many large courts even have these strong ...


13

Although this test is with a "GoPro Hero" ... The GoPro camera can be used for photos but ... the resulting photos are not very good especially not in low-light conditions. Here is an example: First a photo from the GoPro (Hero) (EXIF: F4.9, ISO 250 and 1/15 second) and now the same scene with a Nikon D80 + Tamron 17-50mm F2.8 (EXIF: F5.0, ISO 250 and ...


13

This is a classic use-case for continuous autofocus (AF-C). Nikon uses that term, Canon refers to this mode as AI-Servo. This does not guarantee anything though, just improves your odds depending on: Which camera you use: Advanced cameras have predictive-autofocus which calculate the speed at which a subject moves and keeps moving the focus in that ...


12

Yes it will make a difference even at 1/500s. Sports shooters often use a monopod for the increased stability without the extra hassle of a full tripod setup, though they typically do so with longer heavier lenses. Since your lens is on a single leg, there should be no issue panning. You can achieve some tilt as well, but a head would help with that. With ...


12

You have two excellent answers already, but as @Maynard has enquired about alternative techniques, there is another option if you have a flashgun with a stroboscopic mode: http://www.flickr.com/photos/javo_noso_comio/3414155008/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/14643312@N02/4510423513/ This basically works by firing the flash multiple times during a single ...


11

Executive Summary: I really like the prime over the zooms. I've shot Hapkido (very similar to TKD) using an 85mm f/1.8 prime and with a 60 mm f/2.8 prime on a D200 and D70-- the D90 has better lowlight capabilities than those two cameras. Here's the 85mm on the D200 at f/2.5: This might be a bit of a cheat, however, since there was light from the ...


8

Generally good advice with regard to IS and it's ability to freeze action. However I'm surprised no-one has mentioned the fact that some camera bodies have extra sensitive AF points that are only active with f/2.8 lenses. Thus if you have an f/2.8 lens, even if you end up shooting at f/4 or f/5.6 you are gaining an advantage from the max aperture in terms of ...


8

Well, the three values that matter are aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. All of these are in your control, but only if you know what they do for you. I apologize if you know all this, but others may ask the same question, so... Aperture - This is the ratio of the focal length of the lens to the diameter of its opening. The smaller the aperture number, the ...


8

Indoor sports photography is a big challenge. You're going to have to be shooting wide open likely in high ISO ranges. If you can set up a remote flash somewhere to pick the scene up a couple stops you'll likely be better off. I've got a Canon 70-200 f/2.8 and it was really tough to stop the motion (~1/500-1/1000) even at the high school level without ...


8

Back when we only had film, people thought that having a motor drive would help them "get the shot" by holding down the shutter release and blasting through a roll of film. John Shaw, the nature and landscape photographer, and author of a lot of great books on photography, said that motor drives were not fast enough to get the perfect shot. They were ...


7

Actually, shooting with a compact camera rather than an SLR is part of the problem. Basically, shooting a game at night means that you don't have enough light for decent exposure times. As a consequence, your exposures are long and the moving objects are blurred. The field's lighting are rarely enough to allow you to capture moving subjects with ISO low ...


7

At f/3.5, your problem is probably shallow depth of field combined with being slightly out of focus. This is especially likely if the subject is moving towards or away from you. Other sources of blur include motion blur and poor quality. Motion blur comes from two sources: camera-shake, and subject movement. At your shutter speed and lens length, camera ...


7

I used that 80-200 for quite a few years, and currently use the first iteration of the the 70-200. I think the 80-200 is a steal! It's optically very good, built well, and focuses quickly on a capable body. I don't hesitate to recommend it in the least. (Regarding autofocus: on an N65 and D50 it's not slow to focus, but it's clearly not fast. On an F100, ...


7

When shooting any sort of fast action, shutter speed is paramount -- it's the reason you've got shutter-priority mode. In general, you're going to optimize for shutter speed when you're shooting anything in motion, giving up ISO first, and then aperture if needed in order to get the shutter speed you want. This is where your compromises start, because a ...


7

Based on several friends' experience with both the Sigma 50-500mm and 150-500mm I wouldn't recommend either. Once you move past 250mm or so they get softer and softer as the focal length increases. Most reviews and test charts I've seen for those two lens bear this out. There are several good alternatives that will give you better image quality than ...


6

I have a Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS USM, and I do shoot sports now and then (roller derby for example, since we are talking skating). This is a great lens, sharp even at f/2.8, and I like to shoot at that aperture because of that great, creamy bokeh. Provided that the light is more or less constant at the venue, I shoot in Tv mode (shutter speed priority) and ...


6

Unfortunately, due to a lack of a manual or shutter priority mode on the S70, it may be difficult to capture motion in the way you describe. If there are no 'scene' modes available that provide a long shutter speed your best bet may be to mount the camera on a tripod, disable the flash & set the ISO to its lowest (if possible) then shoot in a low light ...


6

My primary DSLR is a Canon 5D MKII, with an older Canon 450D as a backup body that I use mostly for a set-and-forget timelapse unit with a cheap intervalometer. I've recently moved to using a GoPro HD Hero 960 & GoPro HD Hero 1080p for the TL's I would use the 450D on, although there are very severe limitations. I've got an order in for the new HD Hero ...


6

In principal full frame cameras aren't bad for sports due to lack of reach. All of Canon's supertelephotos will take a teleconverter (or two) and there's always a longer lens you could get, until you hit 800mm with stacked teleconverters which is getting silly, even for sports. You might have to pay more to get the same angle of view with full frame but ...


6

You can use continuous lights to shoot sports in a studio but you're going to have to up the ISO a lot to get a fast enough shutter speed. A better solution however is to use flash. The shortness of the flash duration when using a flashgun that uses trail trimming (where a transistor cuts power after a certain delay when lower power is required (thus giving ...


6

I get the feeling that you are not knowledgeable enough about how the camera works - how ISO, aperture, and shutter speed work together to create an exposure. So my first recommendation is to learn how it works, e.g. from the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. Before proceeding with anything else, learn this. For Sports If you get blurry ...


6

Once in a lifetime! Remember that. The following goes beyond what you asked as there are more factors than 'best lens' - it's also WHY this lens and what else that interacts matters. (Evrything interacs :-) ). (1) Hire a D3s (world's best) or a D700 (superb but not as good) and lens. Or buy a used D700 :-). If you do get a D700 or even with your D7000, ...


6

VR isn't free, it can add hundreds to the cost of a lens, so that is a factor in the price difference. It can also be a real advantage at the long end, though it's less important at the shorter end. However, the real difference in the two lenses is the quality of the glass. The 70-200mm has 7 ED elements versus 3 for the other. The ED elements are high ...



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