Incense

by Bart Arondson

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5

Yes. Canon also has a near-infrared proprietary optical system for wireless flash. It doesn't have a snazzy marketing name like CLS, but is often referred to as "Canon wireless eTTL" or "Canon optical slaving". Like CLS, it can communicate most of the full hotshoe protocol, such as eTTL-II and high-speed sync (HSS). It also allows for control of the remote ...


1

Any optical based system will suffer issues in the conditions you have mentioned. They will likely fail altogether in bright light and will need either line of sight, or something to reflect the light to the flash. They can work reasonably well without direct line of sight indoors, where the walls will typically reflect the light, but outdoors, they are ...


2

Yes the Canon version is called E-TTL flash and you have similar functions as provided with the Nikon CLS system. You will need to use the appropriate compatible Speedlite flashes (Canon and 3rd party models exist). If your camera is an EOS 600D, EOS 650D, EOS 700D, EOS 60D, EOS 70D, EOS 7D or EOS 7D Mark II the built-in / pop-up flash can be set to ...


-1

Apert from showing motion stages of continuous activities or for special effects the multi-flash mode is the least useful. I am sure it was developed to allow the photography of a golf swing in one still frame :-) If multi-flash is used with multiple off-camera units it is possible to observe issues with synchronicity of all the slave flashes.


1

Yongnuo only makes two types of flashes with built-in radio triggers: manual-only flashes (YN-560III & YN-560IV), and the Canon-RT compatible flash, the YN-600EX-RT. The YN-565EX/568EX/500EX (and MkIIs) models do not have a radio receiver built in. The built-in slave modes on the YN-565EX are optical (light-based), not radio. It can be used in Nikon's ...


0

The receiver on the YN565EX is optical. It responds to pulsed light signals sent from the master flash mounted on the camera. This makes it compatible with Nikon's CLS, which is optical. The transmitter on the YN560TX uses radio signals, not optical pulses, to communicate with the flash. You need to attach a radio receiver to the YN565EX so that it can ...


0

The YN-560-TX can only control the power remotely on a YN-560III or YN-560IV. Using it with a YN-565EX will only work if the YN-565EX is on an RF-602 Rx unit, or RF-603, RF-603II, or RF-605 transceiver, and the only control it can offer is firing the flash in sync. (With the RF-605, however, you can also use groups control to turning firing on/off for that ...


0

There are 2 types of YN flashes, one with an integrated 2.4 GHhz receiver, and one without. Which one are you buying? If you are buying the regular YN flash w/o integrated receiver, and you want to do radio-based, off-camera flash, then you will need some type of on-camera trigger, plus a some type of receiver attached to the off-camera flash. If you intend ...


1

One attaches to and sends the signal from your camera. It is what we call the controller or transmitter. The other receives that signal and is attached to the flash and is called the receiver or trigger. Transceivers are able to do both functions: they can act as a transmitter when attached to the camera or as a receiver when attached to the flash. Also ...


4

There is no hard limit to how many YN-560III flashes you can set off remotely with the appropriate transmitter device, as long as the flashes can receive the radio signal. Four is well within its capabilities. However, the YN-560III only has a built-in radio receiver. You still need a radio transmitter. The following Yongnuo models can all be used as a ...


1

You are somewhat incorrect on your assumption of not needing a wireless trigger. This will work, but only in optical trigger mode. That is, using the cameras built in flash control (I believe it is called CLS in the Nikon world). If you want to take advantage of the built in radio receivers, then you will need a single radio trigger on your camera, as it ...


2

The YN560III has a built-in receiver, but it still needs a transmitter. You will need at least one RF602/603 transceiver to act as the transmitter. As for the number of flashes you can control, that would be literally as many as you can cram into the radio range of the transmitter. Your problem with the Neewer flash(es) and radio transmitter was probably ...



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