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by w.hrybok

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13

The "Auto power off" feature can be toggled as one of the unit's "custom features". You need to set feature number 1 to have the value "1". To set the custom features: Press the "C.Fn" button for 2 sec. or more so that "C.Fn" is displayed on screen. Select the Custom Function No. Press the + button to select the Custom Function number ("01"). Change the ...


13

Disable the flash in the camera settings. It still uses the AF-assist beam, but it will not fire the flash. The setting is in different places depending on the camera, for example: EOS 5D: Menu > Custom Functions > 07 EOS 5D mk II: Menu > Tools 3 > External Speedlite control > Flash function settings > Flash firing EOS 550D / Rebel T2i / Kiss X4: Menu > ...


13

More power! Master capability. PC port. Retractable bounce card. "Weather sealing" at the hot shoe. The 580 will also swivel further to the right and a little more downwards. The 430 is a great flash though. I don't think you'd regret it. Too bad you just missed Canon's summer rebate on the 580! It was going for $400. If you got the 430 and eventually ...


10

Canon flash is a bit convoluted. Exactly how the flash behaves varies by camera mode, in some modes the flash will try to act as main light, in other modes it will try to act as fill flash. Unless I misremember, in AV mode the flash will automatically, always, try to behave as a fill flash; the photo will be pretty correcly exposed per the light-meter ...


9

Aside from the obvious thing you're missing (automatic exposure control) the 580EX (and the cheaper 430EX) have an AF-assist LED light which is activated during focussing that can be very useful in low light. It also allows second curtain sync (flash which fires as the shutter closes rather than opens, useful for when doing long exposures with flash), as ...


9

Refer to page 19 of your ST-E3-RT manual. It specifies that when used with camera models released prior to 2012 (so, anything but the 1DX and 5D mark III at the time of this post) you lose high speed sync and your max sync speed is "one increment slower" than whatever it would normally be. The flash sync speed is 1 increment slower Check the flash ...


9

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around ...


7

As with anything you buy used, wear and tear can be a drawback. Flash heads and key electronics do have a limited life, though I can't recall having a flash 'bulb' die on me, usually some other, unknown issue takes their life before then. For the record, I purchased a used 420EX that was used as a rental unit by my local store. So I assumed going in it had ...


6

I just picked up a LumoPro LP160 (about a week ago, in fact). I'm pretty happy with it so far. As Matt indicated, this flash will be manual only, but it works fine as an optical slave (triggered by an onboard flash), and it works fine on the hot-shoe with TTL metering or in manual mode. If you end up getting remote flash triggers (ex: Pocket Wizard or ...


6

Your test button should firing at whatever power you select manually. I can't speak to that specific model, but it has on a few different flash brands I've tried. Its pretty easy to tell if it does. Just set it to high, take a picture and press the test button. Set it to low, take a picture and press the test button. Is there a big difference? ...


6

Unfortunately, no. As of today (October 17th, 2012), built-in radio-controlled wireless flash setup with Canon 600EX-RT speedlites limits you just to two options: 600EX-RT master with 600EX-RT slaves ST-E3-RT master with 600EX-RT slaves Optical wireless mode, on the other hand, allows 600EX-RT master to trigger non-600EX-RT slaves, but that's not what ...


5

The biggest advantage that I know is that it can act as an optical master, and can control a and b groups of slaves (the 430 can act as a slave). They also both have hotshoe hookups, but only the 580 has the pc sync cable, afaik. I own both, and while I'm sure there are various features I am missing, I never notice those differences because i always use ...


5

For off camera lighting with strobes there are several options: Radio Triggers Optical Triggers Wired Setup The best solution in general is either the Pocket Wizard wireless triggers, or the Radio Popper wireless triggers. Both are highly regarded, used universally by pros and amateurs alike, incredibly reliable and perform very well. Newer systems ...


5

430EX does not instantly discharge when you turn it off. Therefore if you do it just for a shot and then turn it back on, it'll still have almost full power and be ready in almost no time.


5

When using a third party speedlight such as your NM930 there is no communication between the camera and flash so the camera has no idea the flash is there, so it pops up the onboard flash as usual. It will dutifully close the circuit across the hotshoe to fire the flash when the shutter opens but that's it. If you use a Nikon flash the flash talks to the ...


5

No, sorry. Some of the Canon EOS range have the ability to wirelessly trigger external flashes from their own, on board, pop up flash. This works by the flash sending out a very quick "burst" of flashes like a code, immediately prior to taking the photograph. The flash unit itself, separate from the camera senses these flashes from the camera body, ...


5

Probably the best source of free information on shooting with a Speedlite and umbrellas is David Hobby's Strobist site. http://strobist.blogspot.com/ Do you have two 430s? If not, how are you using the three umbrellas? Most folks put a flash in each umbrella (that they are using) and shoot though the white, so that it diffuses the light. Typical sets have ...


5

The AF-Beam is is used while the camera focuses but before it meters. Otherwise, metering gets affected and significantly so in condition when the AF-Assist beam may help. In any type of Continuous AF this is not usually the case, so , the AF-beam must be turned off. A camera must also be able to keep focusing, so the AF-Assist beam could create a situation ...


5

They're red LEDs under the cover. I removed the cover from my 430 EX and whilst it works better (with all lenses, on account of producing a brighter, sharper grid pattern) the light is still red. Here's what it looks like without the cover: It's worth noting that you can in theory remove and replace the cover as necessary but I snapped one off the clips ...


5

To cut a long story short, you are using too fast a shutter speed. The shutter consists of two black 'curtains' that travel down over the sensor, one after the other, allowing exposure of the shot. Both these curtains have to be out of the way when the flash fires, otherwise they will block part of the sensor and you get a black bar in your shot. Using a ...


4

The 450D does indeed have a "no flash mode" on the dial but as John states it's one of the auto modes so you can't select aperture etc. There is no way to disable the flash through the camera menu unfortunately on the 450D, the xxD models and above do have a custom function to stop the flash firing (handy if you just want the AF assist lamp) but that's not ...


4

Don't forget that you can also set the parameters for using flash in Av mode on Canon 5D Mk II cameras, with respect to shutter speed. In the 'Custom Function' Menu, > 'Exposure' (C.Fn I), > 'Flash Sync, In Av Mode. You have 3 options: 1. Auto 2. 1/60 to 1/200 3. 1/200 fixed I think that Auto is the default setting, the only problem with this is your ...


4

With manual flash, you have two separate exposures you'll have to set and balance - background exposure and subject exposure (illuminated by flash). Both are affected by aperture and ISO, while only background exposure is affected by shutter speed and only subject exposure is affected by flash power setting. First, you'll set your aperture, ISO and shutter ...


4

I have bought all of mine 2nd hand with success. However I would only buy ones described as excellent/mint condition and only if I could inspect before buying. Things to look for would be corrosion in the battery compartment, any signs of condensation inside from rain or being dropped in the pool :) If the flash has a zoom function, check that, as it's a ...


4

No. On the 430EX product page it says: Compatible Cameras: All Canon EOS cameras... Compatibility between Speedlites and bodies is very good within the Canon world. You don't always get 100% of all features, but the reason for this is generally obvious. For example, older bodies cannot program the radio trigger in the new 600EX-RT from within the ...


4

I have used an original 430 on my 60D with no issues including using it as a slave from the built in trigger on the 60D.


4

If you're setting up the lights, and they're a fixed distance away from your subject, then use manual. Other than if you fire your flashes with insufficient power, your exposure will be consistent from frame to frame. That's the boring example. Nothing is moving. TTL doesn't gain anything over manual. If the distance isn't fixed, then it's still ...


4

You'll need to check your camera instructions. Only the newer Canon DSLRs (eg 7D, 60D) have the built in flash able to work as a Speedlite transmitter. If you've not got one of the more recent cameras, you'll have to consider other options for triggering a remote flash (eg ST-E2, another 580, or - if you can accept manual only flash - an optical slave or ...



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