Time to be with your loved ones

Time to be with loved ones

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22

The first question to ask yourself is Why do I need this prime lens? Is it because they are usually faster than zoom lenses? Is it because they are usually lighter and smaller than zoom lenses? Is it because I like changing lenses frequently (cause with prime you just have one focal length)? Is it because they are usually cheaper than zoom lenses? Or is it ...


14

Against a bridge camera or high-end compact, the arguments are straightforward: a larger sensor gives better image quality, and interchangeable lenses give more flexibility. For dSLR vs. one of the mirrorless alternatives, it's more complicated, but there's two broad reasons here as well: technology maturity and system maturity. Under technical maturity: ...


13

Aside from focal length, the most important thing to consider is the maximum aperture of the lens. That's what people are often looking for when they buy primes. The max aperture is usually part of the lens description such as: 50mm f/1.8 where 50mm is the focal length and f/1.8 is the maximum aperture. The lower that "f/" number is, the better low-light ...


9

The diameter of a lens is at least as large as the diameter of the largest element (almost always the front element though not necessarily so). The lens barrel, hood mountings etc. add a little bit to this diameter but aren't usually the determining factor. The diameter of the front element must be large enough for the entrance pupil to be visible across ...


6

Speed: many P&S and even these newer bridge cameras take time to initialize as well as focus and take a shot. This can be frustrating when you want the shot NOW! when the action is occurring. This can be especially true when the camera is off. DSLRs start up quickly, but more important, when you push the shutter button, the shot happens, instantly. ...


4

Any. Really, this is the good news! Any DSLR is good enough to learn photography. They all have manual controls including manual focusing, custom white-balance and shoot both JPEG images and RAW files. Sure, some are better than other but this is all you need to take control of the photographic process and will give you plenty to learn. There are two ...


4

A search for HTC Wildfire specifications returns very little information about the camera, but searching for specific attributes like "aperture" and "focal length" yeilded some bits and pieces. Wikipedia also had an article on sensor sizes (fourth reference below): Focal length: 3.5mm ISO: 75 Aperture: f/2.2 ? Sensor is probably 1/6" 2.4mm x 1.8mm ...


3

Yes it does. This falls under full manual-controls on most review sites. You can tell this by simply looking at photos of the G15 and noting the positions on the mode-dial. The one labbeled A means you can select aperture while leaving the shutter-speed automatic and the M means that you can adjust both independently. The G15 also happens to have dual ...


2

The D7000 is, I think, much like the Pentax K-5 in this regards (the reviewer is incorrect on his assertion about camera support). The camera is compatible with version 3 of the SD specification (SDXC) but that doesn't mean that the camera has the necessary hardware to take advantage of the greater transfer rates, though it can take advantage of some speed ...


2

The best thing you can do is figure out what you want out of a camera first and then searching for cameras that match that need. It is true that the "non DSLR Cameras" are becoming more advanced but most of these features are implemented in the DSLR variants and in some degrees better. I usually see DSLRs as giving you much more flexibility, if you just ...


2

AF Autofocus Note that with a Nikon lens, "AF" alone, not followed by other letters, means that it's the older type of autofocus which requires an autofocus motor in the body of the camera. It's an older, slower, noisier type of autofocus than a modern "silent wave" autofocus, which would be designated by "AF-s". It also means it's not compatible ...


1

As has been well covered in the question What does "viewfinder magnification" mean?, the magnification rating number of any viewfinder is based on a specific focal length lens. If you double the focal length of the lens from 50mm to 100mm, you also double the amount of magnification the viewfinder provides compared to looking at the world with just ...


1

The size of a viewfinder is you see it through the standard eye-piece is magnification divided by the crop-factor. So a 0.9X on a 1.5X crop camera has the same size as a 0.6X on a full-frame. This gives a very good approximation of the comfort of using a viewfinder. However, a better measure is how big are details shown through the viewfinder. This ...


1

There are two (maybe three) major things to look for in a viewfinder. The first and most important is coverage. Viewfinders provide an approximation of what the sensor sees. While they are looking through the lens, they don't necessarily match exactly with the sensor size. This is why there is normally a % coverage associated with the viewfinder. 100% ...


1

The prize that you mention here is the highest restriction. There are tons of cameras that do what you want to do, but not in the range of 120USD. You best bet will be a camera that follows one of the common standards for webcams, which are controllable through Java. The issue here will be that most of these cameras are made for video and not photography. ...


1

Agree with Itai about Any DSLR. All of low-priced cameras a roughly the same. I'd suggest buying something from Canon, because Nikon cameras of that price range may not have autobracketing feature, which is kinda crucial for outdoor photography. And don't bother much about the lens. You can buy a kit 18-55 lens and be perfectly happy with it for at least ...



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