Serene Life

by garik

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34

As these camera makers own a smaller market share than Canon or Nikon, they have often tried more radical and innovative approaches than the big two. You can see both Canon and Nikon as more traditional makers with very consistent and proven features in their cameras. When Sony bought Konica-Minolta's camera division, they inherited the only body-based ...


32

I don't have specific Sony experience, but I'd suggest getting over the doubts. There's a number of reasons for this: Sony bought Minolta, a camera company, and thus bought into the Minolta legacy and their glass. In other words, your friend isn't correct, there is a lot of Minolta gear on the open market and much, if not all, will work on a Sony. When it ...


12

The problem with your prerequisites is that you've painted yourself into a corner. First you asked for a single lens suitable for landscape (generally wide) and wildlife (long or very long). This restricts you to the few super-zooms around. Then you've asked for that same lens to be good for fast actions and low light, both of which require bright lenses. ...


10

Yes, the A77 has a mechanical shutter and it does move at 12 FPS per second. There are a number of cameras with similar shutter-speeds including some ultra-zooms but indeed this is very fast. What it does not have is a motor to move the mirror. This is more problematic for speed then the shutter itself since a mirror is heavy and has to move out of the way ...


10

If, specifically, you want to cover telephoto and macro, and not necessarily general-purpose nearby photography or wide angle shots, then yes, this is no problem, because relatively long focal length macro lenses are a common design. Sony, for example, has a 100mm f/2.8 macro lens. This won't quite give you the reach of a more extreme telephoto lens ...


10

Distortion caused by a lens's optics would give you barrel distortion (objects appear to bulge outward) or pincushion distortion (squishing inward). The skewed lines you are observing are straight; this is perspective distortion, and is not a problem caused by the lens nor fixable with better optics (you can fix it with a tilt-shift lens, but that's a ...


10

I think it's more the latter of your two reasons: the experience, talent, and care of the group who are willing to spend more on higher-end gear, vs. the format size alone, that creates the impression that better cameras make better pictures all by themselves. Someone who's willing to spend $2000 on a camera body and another $3000 on glass in a brand new ...


10

It's called "Nisen Bokeh" and is mainly due to the lens design (though the background plays a part, it's possible to "provoke" this effect with any lens with the right background). Overcorrected spherical aberration (blur disks which are brighter in the periphery than the centre) is usually to blame. It's showing up more often with the A7 due to the use of ...


9

Minolta, like Canon, changed their mount when they moved to AF in the 1980s. Only Minolta AF lenses can be used on Sony's Alpha mount. The field of view will be cropped due to the fact that the sensor in your camera is smaller than the imaging size of film. So a 50mm lens will have the field of view of a 75mm lens, as the crop factor is 1.5. Here's a good ...


9

Summary: The 18-55mm kit lens is better than many kit lenses and is worth buying. (This is based on an extensive body of information available for both lenses. See below) While many old Minolta Full Frame lenses are very good optically, and better than typical entry level A-mount Sony lenses, in this case the 18-55mm kit lens is noticeably superior ...


9

The biggest advantage (for a non-professional) of the "Big Two" is the availability of third party add-ons. For an enthusiast with a limited budget being able to buy third party lenses and flashes can be a big deal. Also eBay is full of cheep Chinese cables, adapters, triggers and flashes for Canon and Nikon cameras - there is a much smaller selection of ...


8

At least IMO, there are a few real reasons to favor Canon: If you need/will use really long lenses. Canon has the best selection here -- but unless you're really going to use a 1200mm f/5.6, the fact that it's listed in the catalog doesn't really make a huge difference. If you shoot a lot in low light. At ISO 1600 and above, Canon currently does ...


8

A few points that haven't been mentioned about Sony's cameras: The only way to get autofocus Zeiss lenses1. While Zeiss makes lenses for Canon and Nikon mounts, they're strictly manual focus. Yes, old Minolta lenses work -- and many are almost amazingly good on digital. Just for one example, there was a recent comparative review of the old (circa 1985) ...


8

I'm familiar with Canon lenses featuring Image Stabilization that can emit a faint "whir" as IS operates. Your Sony body has a form of image stabilization built into the body, and if that's on during a long exposure, you might be hearing that as it operates. If you're shooting long-exposure shots with the camera mounted on a tripod (which would be best), ...


7

There is no such thing as a universal lens. The shape of the connection, position of the contacts (and electric protocol too), distance between the connector and sensor are all different. There are adapters to bridge the gap which are mostly used for legacy lenses. The reason is that with those adapters you will lose most communication between the body and ...


7

If you want to rent gear a lot of the time you may well be much better off with a Nikon or Canon system. I don't know what it's like where you are but the two rental places I use in the UK stock a wide range or Canon and Nikon lenses, bodies and other accessories and no Sony equipment. This isn't a criticism of Sony, it's just that C&N are far more ...


7

as Itai's answer was very detailed, I will only add some details regarding to Pentax, which at least for me were important when buying my first DSLR: 1) support for AA batteries in Pentax entry level DSLR - some people love it, some hate it ... (I am from the first group :-) ) - currently you can decide as newest K-r supports both. 2) Pentax has excellent ...


7

As it's practically a once in a lifetime situation you might want to consider hiring a professional photographer. If nothing else it should eliminate the stress. The other thing to do is PRACTICE. Practice, practice, practice. This is one of the things that separates professionals from hobbyists. Take the camera with you everywhere and take a shot of ...


7

In all my compact cameras I ever owned (starting from the original Digital IXUS), when the battery was completely empty (in the eyes of the camera) it would automatically switch off and retract the lens. As this surely works by measuring the voltage of the battery, it seems that your one LiIon battery has a rather high voltage ar rest (no current flowing) ...


6

Yes and they should all work. All of mine certainly do. The first thing Sony did when acquiring Konica-Minolta's camera division is release DSLRs with the same mount. These were named Alpha which is the same name Minolta used in Japan, they used the Maxxum name in North America and Dynax in Europe. In other words, Sony Alpha mount IS the Minolta ...


6

The best pro trick is to get a good tripod. You will need it here because even with the remote trigger and self-timer you have to touch the camera between exposures. Then go to Manual exposure mode, then: Select the aperture you need Set the focus and and lock it by going into MF mode Set the white-balance to any setting other than Auto (unless shooting ...


6

I'll add Sigma for completeness. Sigma fits well with the "smaller camera makers can be more experimental" theme: Their primary claim to uniqueness is that the Sigma DSLRs are using a different type of sensor, the Foveon X3, which has higher per-pixel color resolution than the standard Bayer filter sensor. A little background: Almost all DSLRs use a type ...


6

In theory, there should be two areas where the larger sensor provides a noticeable benefit: It should have an advantage at higher ISOs. You should see less noise, and higher ISO overall may be an option. There should be more fine detail overall, but so many factors play into this that you're only likely to be able to discern the difference in controlled ...


6

It is impossible with Lightroom as the camera is not supported. See the supported list. You will have to find other tethering software and check their requirements one-by-one. As a general rule, if your camera is neither Canon nor Nikon, there are far less chances of being supported by anyone else than the manufacturer. So, check with Sony first, they may ...


6

You're getting what is called Perspective distortion which is most noticable in wide angle lenses. Check out this link for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_distortion_(photography) Basically close up objects in the center of the frame will look enlarged while objects on the sides will be stretched away from the center of the photo.


5

The most common cause of spots in pictures is dust stuck to your sensor, but it's also possible that your sensor or AA filter is damaged. Assuming that's a crop (not the whole picture), that looks like dust to me, though it could be something else ("goop", as Stan mentions) stuck to the sensor. This question covers DSLR cleaning techniques, which should ...


5

DT (Digital Technology - source) means that the lens is designed to work with a cropped sensor camera. It should not be used with a full frame sensor or 35mm film. If you use it with a full frame sensor then some of the image would be black, particularly towards the corners, as the light projected by the lens would not cover the sensor. Having a smaller ...


5

The SLT-A55 at least no longer focuses but everything works, even with the mirror removed which you can do without too much difficulty. Exposure is off by about 1/3 EV.


5

The NEX F3 should be superior to the 1 J1 in low-light due to its larger sensors. Now you say, you see the opposite but have not mentioned how you determine superior. The F3 has a much larger pixel count than the J1, so if you look at 100% view, it wont look as good as expect per-pixel. However if you display or print to the same size, the F3 would normally ...



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