The Perfect Sunrise

by NULLZ

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0

Yes, it is. Back in 2012, Ctein, on the Online Photographer blog, actually made a point of creating a print run of one of his favorite m4/3 photographs (made with an E-P1 and m.Zuiko 45/1.8) as 17x22 fine art prints, and then selling 1000 of them at the ridiculously low price of $19.95 so readers could judge for themselves. And in the two years since this ...


2

your 3 images are al expected. Your flash is very little impact. You see impact on the metal pole to the right and the ground in front of you (look at the lower left). Your flash tells your cameras it near daylight 5500K WB) so it sets that WB. In both images with flash. The ground in the bottom and the right metal pole has a nice color with that WB but the ...


2

The brightness of the light from your flash falls off with the square of the distance to the subject. For example, if you are using only flash for illumination and something 10 feet away is exposed properly, then something 20 feet away will be 2 f-stops (4x) darker. Something only 100 feet away will be 100 times (almost 7 f-stops) darker. Conversely, the ...


1

There's 2 things to consider. Firstly the overall contribution of flash compared to ambient light. If the flash is putting out a small amount of light compared to the total ambient light over the course of the exposure then the flash itself and any changes to the flash will go unnoticed. Secondly flash exposure compensation only biases the flash metering ...


0

With an exposure time of 5 seconds, with the amount of light being gathered, the relatively far distance of almost all subjects, and the relative weakness of the flash used, I would expect there to be very little difference. The difference between photos 1 & 2, and photo 3 is the white balance.


1

Two of those scene modes combine photo bursts in-camera for greater dynamic range, noise reduction, or (in other cameras) zoom range, shallow depth of field, etc. Although you can post-process your own bracketed or burst of photos, the camera might make you trade off pixel depth (in RAW mode) vs. burst speed (in JPEG mode), and you'll need image stacking ...


2

The scene modes are simply collections of settings to make 'auto mode' work in a way suited to particular subjects (e.g. the 'portrait' mode will prefer large apertures, the 'landscape' mode will prefer small apertures - to give a simple example). If you're comfortable setting aperture / shutter speed / ISO yourself (and know what to use for different ...


1

I have a NEX-3N. There, when the magnified view is displayed, you can switch between the two magnifications via the button next to the lower right corner of the display (next to it, the magnification you can switch to is displayed, while in the upper left corner you see the current magnification). To complete the answer for others, here's how to enable the ...



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