Serene Life

by garik

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10

Distortion caused by a lens's optics would give you barrel distortion (objects appear to bulge outward) or pincushion distortion (squishing inward). The skewed lines you are observing are straight; this is perspective distortion, and is not a problem caused by the lens nor fixable with better optics (you can fix it with a tilt-shift lens, but that's a ...


10

I think it's more the latter of your two reasons: the experience, talent, and care of the group who are willing to spend more on higher-end gear, vs. the format size alone, that creates the impression that better cameras make better pictures all by themselves. Someone who's willing to spend $2000 on a camera body and another $3000 on glass in a brand new ...


10

It's called "Nisen Bokeh" and is mainly due to the lens design (though the background plays a part, it's possible to "provoke" this effect with any lens with the right background). Overcorrected spherical aberration (blur disks which are brighter in the periphery than the centre) is usually to blame. It's showing up more often with the A7 due to the use of ...


10

In this case, you shouldn't be using a grey card at all. Grey cards (and related devices and and cards) are used as a reference point to make an image's color neutral, as your second two images show, but you don't want neutral, you want warm. What you need to do is change to color temperature and/or saturation in post processing; changes to color ...


8

You're not buying the camera for the lens, nor planning to use only that lens, are you? And the review is not that bad: the lens is actually pretty good in the medium to upper range. Mainly there seems to be two criticisms: at the wide end, resolution is not good - but still better than not having it at all; other kit zooms just don't go that wide. ...


7

In most cameras the scene modes automatically set the file type to JPEG and apply different processing settings to those files (Landscape mode often boosts greens and blues, sunset mode boosts reds, for example). They also prioritise aperture and/or shutter speed appropriately. However, this comes at the cost of creative freedom - the camera is making all ...


6

You're getting what is called Perspective distortion which is most noticable in wide angle lenses. Check out this link for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perspective_distortion_(photography) Basically close up objects in the center of the frame will look enlarged while objects on the sides will be stretched away from the center of the photo.


6

In terms of which angles of view the lens(es) will allow you to select, you're correct: the combination of an 18-55 lens and a 55-200 lens will let you choose from exactly the same angles of view as a single 18-200 lens. However, I think you are missing a couple of important points, both of which are well covered in this answer: you'll get better image ...


5

Sticking with your requirements of around 12mm or so focal length, rectilinear, autofocus and less than around $400, the simple answer to this is "no, you can't have that" even if you're prepared to compromise on other things like speed, optical quality and (lack of) zoom. If you're prepared to give up on autofocus (which generally isn't too much of a ...


5

It is not. What you are referring to is sensitivity to light. That is the ISO sensitivity is for and while there is a standard that describes it, digital sensors do not match exactly the posted sensitivity. A site like DxOMark actually measures ISO equivalence as part of its sensor benchmarks and you can commonly see a difference of ±1/3 EVs. The other ...


5

Theoretically both images should be the same brightness, even though the NEX sensor is larger, it stills receives same amount of light per unit area both lenses were set to f/3.5. The difference in brightness is due to different processing, there's nothing in the ISO standard that guarantee the same digital brightness values given the same exposure and ISO ...


5

There are many photos in the A6000 pool that look amazing [...] I can't get that close with any of my photos on the a6000. I think this is probably the most important point here - the photographer is much more important than the gear in making a photo. The best thing you can do at this point is to go away and practice, practice, practice (and possibly ...


5

These are different designs, developed at different times. Forty years have gone between each was initially launched as the A-mount was simply acquired from Minolta which had by then fused into Konica-Minolta. The A-mount introduces AF which worked by Phase-Detection and hence lenses for that mount are designed to focus that way. Over the years, they were ...


5

No, larger sensor cameras are not more likely to mis-focus - if you take the Canon 1DX (with a modern lens) for example, it's a full-frame camera that's about as far away from "likely to mis-focus" as possible. But when a large sensor camera mis-focuses it's more noticeable, especially when most tiny sensor cameras (cellphones) have wide angle lenses. The ...


4

You are looking at it wrong. I've never had an accident or ever even seen an accident occur while I've been driving, but Nascar drivers are either in or witness accidents all the time. Does that mean that Nascar drivers are worse drivers? No, it means they are in situations where accidents happen more frequently. The same thing applies to your Flickr ...


4

An adapter is great if you already have Canon lenses or want to share lenses between Canon DSLRs and NEX cameras - but it isn't that good compared to getting the Sony lens. No adapter is perfect (actually, the lens and camera aren't perfect either) The adapter will add some more (usually small and almost unnoticeable, unless you pixelpeep) misalignment to ...


4

The problem is actually a problem of neither your eyes nor the camera being able to capture the color. Your best bet is setting the white balance to "sunlight" and going from there. Here is the reason: color is a continuum of wavelengths, like sound is a continuum of frequencies. Now the human eye has three different kind of receptors that have some ...


3

You are correct that there is no free lunch. Software NR works by looking for sharp edges and trying to identify what is detail and what is noise, but at a very fine level, they can't be distinguished. What you will normally see with light NR is a reduction in fine detail, but gross detail is maintained. The more you turn up NR, the more gross the detail ...


3

First off, let's talk about your eyes. Just because you feel no discomfort is no guarantee you are safe to look at the sun with your naked eye. From a NASA news release about safe solar viewing during an eclipse: Damage to the eyes comes predominantly from invisible infrared wavelengths. The fact that the Sun appears dark in a filter or that you feel no ...


3

You're correct, a higher ISO will introduce noise and cause detail to be lost. However, it's important to understand how far you can increase ISO before it makes a noticeable impact. By the numbers, I'm sure that increasing one stop from 100 to 200 will undoubtedly result in a nearly imperceptible difference under pretty much any condition. I bet going from ...


3

I'm not sure this will be the answer you're looking for, but I'll give it a shot. I won't mention focal length anywhere, either, as you don't want to base any comparison on that. Forgive me if I slip up. Short answer If you want to compare lenses qualitatively/subjectively, you need to test them shooting the scenes you intend them for. Compare your results ...


3

"How do I compare two prime lenses of different focal lengths? …I have two prime lenses, they capture different fields of view, so I'm comparing apples to oranges." By looking at pictures. Ideally lots of them, taken under conditions that match what you expect to use the lenses for, and deciding what you personally like. But then that's also the best way to ...


3

Low light, long exposure and "landscape" photography like your example is typically where you want to use your manual focus, live view assisted by zooming in. AF points need contrast, and you should point your camera at the edges of the white illuminated walls to preselect focus, confirm the focus is correct, and then place your camera. In concert fotography ...


3

The Sony A6000 is an interchangeable-lens camera. If you were stuck with a poorly-rated lens, that should indeed be a major factor. But you're not stuck with that. You can either buy the camera in a "kit" including the lens or without the lens for $150 less. It sounds like you might want to skip the kit lens and save the money towards something else from the ...


3

Most kit lenses don't get glowing reviews. Where you have to take the "invest in the glass not the camera" philosophy to heart is in the overall lens selection for the mount you're about to buy into. Digital bodies come and go all the time. They depreciate at the rate of most digital electronics: rapidly. Glass is much slower to lose value or to become ...


3

More generally, you'll find that most cameras which are primarily stills cameras will be limited to 30 minutes of video. This is due to EU regulations which mean that anything which can record longer than 30 minutes is a "video camera" and attracts a higher rate of duty. Panasonic are a notable exception to this in that they produce separate EU and non-EU ...


3

I think the key thing for here is that smaller sensors inherently have more depth of field at the same aperture number and framing. That means that with a larger sensor, focus is more critical. It's not that the larger sensor is really worse. With a camera phone, in low light, the result will be very noisy (with automatic, non-optional noise reduction ...


3

Most advanced cameras allow you to separate exposure and/or focus lock from a half press of the shutter button to allow each photographer to choose how and when focus and exposure are locked for a given composition. Even what happens by default in the camera's "factory" settings will often vary based on what shooting modes in terms of exposure and focus are ...


3

It means the same thing as it normally would. A lens can not let in more light than the size of its widest aperture though. Focus is achieved with the aperture all the way open. In other words, at EV0 (enough light for an f/1 image at ISO 100 for 1 second exposure), your camera will let in enough light through an f/2.8 lens to focus. If, however, you ...



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