Sunset in Kruger

by MrFrench

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2

Though the title says Edit photos with an external program the description says: select a photo One at a time works but not multiple.


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I am not sure if you are refering to a mosaic software, not collage one. https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=mosaic+software I would do some previouis steps. 1) Make a backup of my photos. 2) Use a batch resampling and croping of the photos. I would need to calculate the size of each one but let's say 500x500px will do. 3) Use a mosaic program.


2

The question of Rowland Shaw is a pertinent one. The battery level indeed seems to have an impact on the size of an individual focussing step. At least, that was my observation when I was trying to automate landscape focus stacking with Magic Lantern. As my first objective was to simply count the number of steps of a full throw (i.e. from close to infinity), ...


1

I use Capture One Pro from Phase One. Opinions differ on this versus Lightroom, but I find that overall Capture One works more like I do. Here's the rub. If you have experience with a different RAW converter, you will need to start unlearning that workflow. Fortunately, Phase One has great instructional videos online. On the minus side for C1, using it as a ...


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Yes. Download a copy of Canon's Digital Photo Professional from the Canon website (at least in the US). Canon has changed their download policy and now grants access to the full installers, rather than just updaters. You no longer have to have the original disk to download the software utilities that come in the box with the camera. You simply need the ...


3

If you couldn't find any information about their protocol (you've probably also tried Google search for communication protocol keywords directly on their site by typing keyword site:fujifilm.com) it isn't probably readily available. You can contact Fujifilm, explain them your intentions and they might help you. There might also be another option - you ...


0

Assuming that: The focal length has been recorded in the file metadata You are running a Unix-like OS such as Linux or OS X You have installed the exif command line tool Run this on the command line: exif /path/to/your/photos/* | grep "Focal Length [^A-Za-z]*|" \ | awk -F "|" '{print $2}' | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr Example ...



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