Spring 2012

Spring 2012
by ani

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0

There is now XnViewMP (free for personal use) which has both 32- and 64-bit processing, supports multithreading, and pre-caches images as you view them. It also has batch-processing capabilities, picture resizing, advanced JPEG encoding options, etc. The only downside are some nasty bugs and weird keyboard shortcuts (which can be customized, to match ...


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I personally haven't done this myself but I found a website where someone describes a way to do it: http://davecornthwaite.tumblr.com/post/64763254999/how-to-create-a-daily-photo-project-video. To ensure your face is pretty much in the same position you could use photoshop and draw guidelines at mouth and eye level and the base of your chin. You can then ...


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Mac has a free gamut preview tool and you can compare two gamuts as well. It is part of the system ColorSync utility. It shows the gamut in 3D. I think I've seen a web based viewer once, not sure if it still exists. Argyll CMS package can show gamuts, not sure if it can overlap two in one plot.


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You don't need any software to compare gamut coverages For what it's worth, you can get the three X-Y chromaticity coordinates from the monitor manufacturer and the three from the ink manufacturer and plot them on a plain X-Y coordinate graph paper. Connect the apex points with lines and compare/look at them directly. The two shapes will overlap. Parts that ...


2

You didn't specify what camera you have. Most DSLRs can be tethered, as well as many mid-range and high-end bridge camera.Assuming you have a camera that supports tether control, you will need several things for a 24-hour timelapse: Tether connection: Just about any camera today that supports tethering can be connected to a PC with a USB cable (sometimes ...


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Canon will almost certainly always have a version of Digital Photo Professional to include with their cameras. Apple may not always support Aperture. (Yeah, I know. Hindsight's always 20/20)


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Using the Nik Tools without the adobe software is a pain, though as Michael points out they should save back over the original file. A file search on the name might yield something (or it may not); but, a surefire way to find out is using the SysInternals tool called Process Explorer, written by a (now) Microsoft employee it will tell you exactly what ...


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I can't tell you WHERE the files was save on your system, but you might try this route to FIND the saved image. I've had to do this in the past. Just use the SEARCH bar in Windows and type in the file name (or any part of the file name that you remember) and see if it finds your file. If you find it, open the file, clickon "Save As", and then note the file ...



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