Forgotten in its old age

by Aditya

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0

It's worth pointing out that you don't need metadata to know if a photo has been altered. For example, if you push the saturation and contrast very high you'll get an unnatural look that I doubt cameras can produce. Or, crop the photo to an odd aspect ratio or resize it to an uncommon size, and those are also going to be two indicators that the photo has ...


0

Yes and No. I just tried opening a jpeg in Preview, cropped it, messed with the colour, saved. There was nothing in the metadata to indicate Preview had done anything, but that's just because Preview didn't add those notes to my edits. Lets assume editing software does add notes. If I run mogrify with the -strip option on the image file it will delete ...


0

Photoshop's "Quick Selection" tool uses edge-detection to help you quickly produce a selection by roughly running along the edges you want to define your area. Use the smallest diameter that allows you to work comfortably, and fine-tune the threshold setting of the tool as necessary. Once you have the selection you want, a wide range of techniques are at ...


1

Yes if you are saving the file or exporting it the EXIF will reflect that. EXIF changes are easy to detect if one is comparing a file to the original, but keep in mind this can typically be easily faked or manipulated if desired. Open up a file before and after with ExifTool and you'll be able to tell exactly what the Preview app changes. We have lots of ...


0

I hope You scrolled this much down, because I found my final answer to this. There is a new kid in town it seems! It's called Time Lapse MovieMonkey and it's quite awesome! It did the job of creating my latest time lapse movie really really really fast. And I didn't have to read the instructions. It's simple and intuitive, but has enough advanced settings. ...


24

Simply select and copy the screen/glare you want to overlay, and paste it to a new layer. Set the Blending Mode to Hard Light. Then paste in your product image in a new layer and place it underneath the glare layer (you will obviously need to do some jiggery pokery to fit this image onto the screen in the photo). Result:


0

The only alternative to an own printer profile created with a spectrophotometer is working with the ICC profiles that some paper manufacturers offer as standard on their homepage for download... I only calibrate my screens with a Spyder4Elite and print with these type of ICC profiles to print.


0

Reading your comment below the question, I believe F3 does exactly what you want. It compiles on Linux/Mac OS X and is also available via Homebrew.


0

There is a tiny switch on the card itself. Move it to the opposite position.


0

I don't know that any such software exists. Even if it did, you would get marginal results or even get less accurate color than looking for publicly available ICC profiles that are published for the printer and your given paper type (if you are using a typical paper with the printer). Even if you are not, you can print out sheets and send them in to ...


2

Turns out to be a setting in the Registry, look at: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\StorageDevicePolicies If there is a value WriteProtect, set it to 0, if not, create it as a DWORD and set it to 0 Solution found at kioskea.net


0

This only works if you have the camera set on continuous file numbering. Hit the button on the camera to view images. There should be a number in the upper right of the screen. The 1000d starts at 100-0001, and counts up to 100-9999. at 10,000 images, you should see 101-0001. Even if you delete an image from your camera and take another, the counter ...


1

I have tried Capture NX-D, Capture NX-2 and the DxO Optics Pro 7 (the newest version is 9, but 7 can be downloaded for free till the end of this month). Of these applications Capture NX-2 has a very nice tool called Control Points which provides an easy way of manipulating selected features of the photo. E.g. you put a control point on someone's face and ...


2

You aren't really missing a lot in terms of RAW manipulation and actually may have some slightly improved options with the vendor provided RAW editor. The main thing that third party tools are designed for is workflow management and cataloging. They make it easier to manage large numbers of files, tagging them so they can easily be found later and ...


0

I recommend you put those questions on an astro amateur forum, e.g. Cloudy Nights. You will get more answers + advice with respect to astronomical use of DSLRs or software...



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