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by VonSchnauzer

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14

This particular logo is easy, because: It's only three colors It's relatively simple vector art there's a simple outline around the shapes The goal is reconstruction, not preservation of a masterpiece That means you don't need to light it very well and you don't need to worry too much about noise. Take a photograph straight down, and notice any sources ...


12

Since asking this question, and answering my own question I've faced the same problem so many times that I decided to write a website that solves it in a nice free way. You just upload a photo and then you can just download a jpeg ready to print at 6"x4". www.oddprints.com Output photo: Sorry if this is a bit spammy, but it is a free website, no need ...


12

Technically any software that is capable of stitching regular photos would be capable of stitching macro photos as well. However, to be able to accurately stitch photos they need to be taken with little or no parallax (movement of the camera's optical centre). This is typically achieved by rotating the camera/lens about it's optical centre using a "VR" ...


7

As far as I know there are two possible solutions. I will explain both of them below. EOS utility This software is supplied with your camera. It can be downloaded from the internet, but it's a hassle. It's better if you install it from the CD and update it. When you have it on your computer do the following: Connect your camera through USB. Start EOS ...


6

Are you familiar with The Photographer's Ephemeris? http://photoephemeris.com/ That will help decide where the sun and moon will be at a given time at a specific location. I use that to help me during an initial scouting session. Truly stunning landscapes are usually created with a mixture of knowledge, preparedness, and patience. The best weather ...


6

If you have an android phone with geolocation and compass, Google nightsky is outstanding. Or if you're on your computer http://www.google.com/sky/ google sky. I'm sure you could find better software for the task, but if you're just trying to get the milky way or a constellation or two, it will do the trick.


6

The next version of OS X Yosemite will have an application Photos that Apple intends to integrate many of Apertures features into. What features will be carried over from Aperture we do not yet know. As of right now Apple is noting that Photos will be available "Next Year"(2015). The obvious other solution is Lightroom as you have already pointed out. Here ...


5

You could use the majority of software that handles barrel distortion, and just either setup a profile and save/reuse that profile, or reuse the settings by syncing the settings. An example of this software would be PTLens, but many solutions exist. Since this is a fixed focal length lens, you don't need to worry about changing the settings for each image - ...


5

Lightroom is a great app for organisation and workflow and from version 3 you can set up your Flickr, Smugmug/Facebook, whatever sharing accounts, and post directly from within Lightroom once you're happy with your photo :-) EDIT: Lightroom features website -- has a little video on there of publishing photos to external service. Flickr would also give you ...


5

Lightroom 4 will look at GPS data and pulls Google maps to show you where you've taken your pictures and lets you search/filter by location, among other things.


5

Lightroom is pretty much the defacto standard for photo management. It has the backing of Adobe and this gives it more chance to last than the competition. This is a double-edged swords as some people are concerned that Adobe will abuse its power and force users to buy into a subscription model with little to escape since the majority of data is stored with ...


4

Camera360 for sure! Reasons : Effect like LOMO, Retro Effect, Dreamlike Effect, Art of Black and White, Back to 1839 and Night Enhancement will make your photo more beautiful. The amazing HDR effect is even better than iPhone HDR. Unique Funny Mode: Effects like Surrealistic B&W Paining, Vertical/Horizontal Left Symmetry, Vertical/ Horizontal Right ...


4

I'd go with Photoshop Mobile app it seems the best that I've tried so far.


4

I don't know it by first hand, but I found out the following blog post. Apparently, Capture One Pro is able to find out the sharpest image in a sequence, as the following blurb points out: If you shoot a large quantity of images in a short period of time, for example with portrait or fashion work, it can often be time consuming to select the images with ...


4

The unofficial firmware extension magic lantern has this feature. There you can select an arbitrary Image that you have taken with this camera on the sd card in playback mode and overlay it in live-view mode.


3

My original recommendation was RedCart. I was thinking that they did have a non-flash based option for mobile users. Unfortunately at this time they do not. They have promised that as an option with or right after version 4, which is slated for February 2013. Since that is still down the road, you might want to hold off. I still really like RedCart and ...


3

There is a wonderful and hugely popular, open source, cross platform based software called Stellarium which is available at http://www.stellarium.org/. It is free and has tons of features. You can track almost every celestial object with it.


3

Answering my own question on behalf of a friend who showed me Geotag. This is a Java software that can show you any number of pictures on a map in a browser winder. No need to upload anything, it fetches the maps from Google Maps and uses a local http server to display them. So, it is one possibility that matches what I am looking for. It can show the ...


3

There are a number of free and open source tools that will do this, for Linux, Mac, or Windows. If you just need something very simple, jhead should do. Put it in a loop and output the result to one or more text files. If you need more sophisticated options, you can step up to one of Exiv2 or ExifTool. These can read and write all sorts of metadata, ...


2

Picasa has a Geo-Tag feature that allows you to use Google Earth to write EXIF location data. You get to see some small picture thumbnails on the Google Earth's map - it's nice to see photos you've taken while traveling to a certain area. I believe this is possible with pictures already containing EXIF location data - check out this link. This does not ...


2

I've been religiously geocoding my photos for a number of years - I find it handy for scouting locaitons -- so if I get a photo of some bluebells thta have gone past their best, I can know exactly where to go to get the shot for the next year's season.


2

I have just found a useful site that provides a comparison of how tags and other metadata are handled in across a range of popular applications http://www.happydigitalphotos.com/photo-management-software Its basically what I was looking for (re tagging methods), although it is a bit dated (seems to have been written in 2010) and hence is not based on most ...


2

I've used iPhoto, Picasa, Adobe Bridge, and Lightroom, I can't speak on the others. By far my favourite and most useful program to use is Lightroom. I have used it since Lightroom 1.3 and have upgraded each level to Lightroom 4. It's basically a cross between Adobe Bridge and Photoshop with the ease of use of iPhoto and Picasa. Especially with ...


2

To get a good photo to work with you would want: A long focal length (i.e. taken as far up as possible, not a wide angle closeup). As close as possible from right above. As even lighting as possible. Normally a good light source (i.e. not fluorescent light) is needed to get a full range of colour, but in this case it's not so important as the logo only ...


2

Personally, I use Adobe Lightroom for my cataloging. It's not free, but it does an excellent job of allowing alterations to meta data, letting you specify ratings and categories, even letting you make many non-destructive edits to the images (including applying edits in bulk). It is well within your price range. It also has a lot of great output options ...


2

Manfrotto has one for (obviously) its own line-up of products. It is pretty sophisticated but any subjective decisions are set by their own programmers. Some other manufacturers have a simple search based on weight and height (among some others maybe) requirements which you have to figure out yourself.


2

You can try Kuuvik capture, it should have some interesting focus peaking function more info here: Northlight Images 'Kuuvik Capture' review 'Kuuvik Capture' website I too will find very useful a tool for finding the sharpest image in a sequence. I didn't have the occasion to try Kuuvik Capture, but it looks interesting.


2

This may not be a very elegant solution, it's more of a hack, but I once read a tip about searching for the sharpest picture out of a stack: look for the heavier files! I've used this method several times, and it works. From a technical standpoint, this makes sense because the JPEG algorithm will compress your RAW files a lot more when you take blurry ...


2

For Windows, GeoSetter (freeware) can do this. You can select a GPX file, then it will tag the photos based on this. You can also edit tags manually. It can show all of your photos on a map, and set image positions from the map. It has options for saving data in the image files, or as separate sidecar files. It does use ExifTool for saving data.


2

It isn't quite the report-oriented output you're asking for, but you can do something similar with LightZone, an open source (formerly proprietary, but the company went belly-up) RAW conversion program for Linux, Windows, and Mac. This screenshot shows the zonemapper tool, and you can see visually how different zones correspond to parts of your images, and ...



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