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61

If you want them to stand out against the background, you need to use a flash. On-axis will generally reflect the most light off the snowflakes to the camera and have them stand out more. I used a cheap eBay plastic cover with a space for the flash for the picture below. Otherwise, a fast shutter speed may make them visible, but it depends on the background ...


14

Set the exposure compensation to +1 or +2 (or shoot manual!) as snow reflects a lot more light than the 18% reflectance that the camera's metering system assumes. Filters wise just what you'd use for landscapes, a graduated ND and polarizer are helpful. Composition-wise, isolating details can be difficult if everything around you is white so you have to ...


10

In the photo you put in the question, note how the foreground is extremely underexposed. This is because the exposure metering was made relative to the snow. However, if you set the snow to the standard exposure, you will get a "dark", gray snow. You need to add about 2 stops with Exposure Compensation (or use manual mode) in order to get a bright white ...


8

Snow will be just grey before other snow. So you have to find a background (beginning of snow falling), use a lightsource nevertheless (like a flash) or wait for a sun-snow-mix (seldom, but worth it ... the glittering flakes are precious, halos are sometimes an extra). I can understand that you don't like using flash (on the camera) as it highlights the ...


5

If you are taking photos of fast-moving subjects, and the subjects are blurry, there are a few potential causes: Use of a lens that is to slow An f/3.5-5.6 aperture is SLOW An f/2.8 or wider aperture is faster Use of a lens that does not have IS Image stabilization helps eliminate camera shake blur Use of a camera that lacks adequate AF capabilities ...


5

Polarizers are a good start if you want to achieve a blue sky, but they can be difficult or impossible to use with a wide angle lens due to the angle to the sun that will change across the image. I still would recommend one to any photographer. A graduated neutral density filter may be the best investment. It will allow you to lower the contrast in that ...


5

A polarizer might improve certain shots but it's by no means a must. I have done plenty of winter alpine and snowsports photography without a polarizer (mainly due to using ultrawide lenses). Sometimes when shooting on the slopes you can't afford to waste time fiddling with a polarizer. you might need some ND filters if you plan on doing any panning or ...


5

Most important: put your camera down for a while and make a snowman! But before that, here is one of my attempts from a couple of years ago: I am afraid that I just pointed and shot to get this one - but I like the effect - quite subtle - it's a picture of the subject on a snowy day, rather than a picture of snow. Anyway, my advice: take lost of ...


4

The exposure settings to stop moving objects depends entirely on how fast the objects are traversing your frame. Falling snow falls at a variable speed depending on the particular storm. The focal length of your lens will determine the size of your frame, so the answer is different for a 100mm lens and a 35mm lens. Another factor is how far away the ...


4

This depends a lot on the size of the snow flakes and how fast they are falling. It also depends on lens (wide/tele). Regardless, I would not advise using a flash if at all possible, if you must use a flash use one off camera or bounce/diffuse the on camera flash. Use a mid range aperture and a high shutter speed to stop the flakes. If you can do 125 or ...


4

Generally speaking, condensation problems only manifest when moving your gear from/to a nice, warm interior to/from the cold outdoors. Once outside, once your gear has adjusted to the temperature, the concern is not nearly as great. The 7D is a professional grade camera, and as such is fully weather resistant. So long as you use professional grade lenses ...


4

Personally, I'd try it and see which works better. If the polarization kills too much of the light from the sky, then I'd remove it but if there is too much glare from the snow, I'd leave it. Both could be problems and the amount of each problem is going to depend on the composition and angle of your shots. If you don't have much sky, then the sky being a ...


4

It appears to be a cheap plastic rain cover that can be purchased over sites like ebay or amazon. You have to search for the terms camera rain cover. These are cheap ones though they only stop rain to a certain amount. Ebay rain cover optech rain sleeve


3

Lens hood - high likelyhood you're going to fall in snow or ice, this will protect the end of your lens. Weather sealed lenses (so L lenses I believe) since your body is also weather sealed A good camera bag with padding that to protect it from the high likelyhood that you'll slip and fall at some point. The main thing with condensation is the transition ...


3

Not just in snow, but in general, in cold, battery runs out much faster. If it is not snowing, you are okay. However, your kit lens is not water sealed, so you must protect it from snow similarly to protecting from rain. I do not think that would be necessary. However, check the specs of your battery. (Minimum operational temperature, minimum storage ...


3

Great tips by @Matt Grum, and I'll add that if you have a Canon, your camera may have an "Highlight Tone Priority" option that you can enable in the menus. Metering is tricky when a scene is very bright (snow, wedding dress). This option can help prevent blowing out the highlights in very bright areas. According to Canon: "Highlight Tone Priority mode gives ...


3

The one thing not mentioned so far that you will want to look at is to set your exposure compensation, especially for frames that are mainly snow filled. The automatic metering built into you camera will try and make the white grey, so adding a stop or two of exposure compensation will bring out the white again. It depends on your camera how you do this. If ...


3

On a sunny day, take along ND-filters if you want to use a small F-stop/big aperture for a shallow DOF. Even a DSLR really fast hits the shutter-speed-barrier. If you want to take longer exposures to smooth out flowing waters, utilize an even darker ND filter and of course a tripod ;) Maybe use a grey card for setting white balance, if not, be sure to shoot ...


2

I was able to snap some pictures early in the morning during a recent blizzard. I believe it depends on what effect you are after. Sometimes a longer focal length, focused on the background can make for some interesting, surrealistic effects with the up close snowflakes. A smaller aperture will show the shape of the blades. A larger aperture will turn them ...


2

Experiment and set exposure compensation at +1 stop. This worked for me yesterday!


2

The problem with snowy landscapes is that it is usually very highly contrasted. You need to understand that a photograph can only display a range of 5 f-stops. This means that if you define a specific area as being the medium luminosity point, then any area that is darker from this medium area by more than 2.5 f-stops will be plain black, and any area that ...


2

Others have addressed most of your points about the battery life and such. I will address your last one. Yes, bring a large ziplock bag. Put your whole camera with lens in the bag when going back inside to prevent condensation on your equipment. If you cannot wait to download the pictures, take a second (small) ziplock to put your card in before you go ...


2

to improve battery life I was used to put the camera under my jacket to keep the battery close to room temperature. I do not think you need any special protection. Only when taking photos during snowfall would use something like the plastic foil camera rain cover - you can buy it on Ebay for about 5 USD :-) Do not know how long will it last (especially when ...


2

SNOWY STREET STYLE AT NEW YORK FASHION WEEK: OUTSIDE RAG & BONE None of the photographers appear to be the same, but this is the event where your photo came from, and the general style of cover looks the same. Just perhaps more tightly wrapped in later photos. Maybe not.. Somebody may well have been selling them on the spot - which would account for the ...


2

This would depend on what look you are going for. If you use any of the auto settings the camera will attempt to make the picture more or less uniformly lit and you'll end up with super bright street lights and/or dark snow as the camera wants everything to be grey. If you want a low key (dark) image you need to apply exposure compensation or use manual ...


2

This isn't exactly an optimal example - as it is overexposed and not all that interesting :) But I took this image a few years ago with a Canon Rebel XT and the kit 18-55mm f/4-5.6 lens, so the quality that your setup can get will be a step above this. Canon Rebel XT Canon 18-55mm at 18mm Aperture: f/10 Shutter: 1/800 sec ISO: 400 Mode: Action Obviously ...


1

I would set the camera on Tv (shutter priority). This allows you to pick a shutter speed and let the camera do the rest. I'd start at about 1/500s. Set the ISO TO AUTO. Try panning with the skiier as well. As for at night, shooting wide open at high ISO is your only option. Panning will help. Using a flash is advisable if it is allowed. Night is pretty ...


1

I'm a bit worried with the first answer proposed, since for me, both for physical reasons and in my experience, condensation definitely happens not when going from warm inside to cold outside but exactly the opposite, when you bring back your (very cold) gear from the snowy outside in. Think e.g. the same happens when you take a cola out of the fridge. In ...


1

Manually set the white balance. If you leave the camera on AWB, your photos will appear too cool. Using the "cloudy" or "shade" white balance will give you much more pleasing results.


1

Using the snow itself to set white balance works pretty well -- you want the snow to look white, so tell the camera that it is.



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